The Christian Remembrancer, Band 12

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F.C. & J. Rivington, 1846
 

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Seite 298 - And he said unto Abram, Know of a surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall afflict them four hundred years...
Seite 7 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs. And the thoughts of men are widen'd with the process of the suns.
Seite 3 - And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Seite 92 - A commonwealth is said to be instituted, when a multitude of men do agree, and covenant, every one, with every one, that to whatsoever man, or assembly of men, shall be given by the major part, the rights present the.
Seite 92 - Justice and injustice are none of the faculties neither of the body nor mind. If they were they might be in a man that were alone in the world, as well as his senses, and passions. They are qualities that relate to men in society, not in solitude. It is consequent also to the same condition that there be no propriety, no dominion, no mine...
Seite 110 - Turns the long light that drops adown the wall, Turn the black flies that crawl along the ceiling, All are turning, all the day, and we with all. And all day, the iron wheels are droning, And sometimes we could pray, 'O ye wheels,' (breaking out in a mad moaning) 'Stop!
Seite 92 - To this war of every man, against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place.
Seite 7 - Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range, Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.
Seite 345 - At the same time let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.
Seite 97 - When a man reasoneth," says Hobbes, " he does nothing else but conceive a sum total, from addition of parcels ; or conceive a remainder from subtraction of one sum from another ; which, if it be done by words, is conceiving of the consequence of the names of all the parts to the name of the whole; or from the name of the whole and one part, to the name of the other part.

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