The Last Man

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The Floating Press, 01.05.2009 - 772 Seiten
Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, wrote the apocalyptic novel The Last Man in 1826. Its first person narrative tells the story of our world standing at the end of the twenty-first century and - after the devastating effects of a plague - at the end of humanity. In the book Shelley writes of weaving this story from a discovery of prophetic writings uncovered in a cave near Naples. The Last Man was made into a 2008 film.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

This one had a (very) few interesting elements, and the account of the plague overwhelming the world was pretty chilly ... but overall, hardly a surprise this this novel has been largely forgotten. Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - ToddSherman - LibraryThing

Mary Shelley’s “The Last Man” showed promise near the beginning: “There is no fruition in their vacant kindness, and sharp rocks lurk beneath the smiling ripples of these shallow waters.” And then ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Introduction
6
Chapter I
14
Chapter II
32
Chapter III
58
Chapter IV
77
Chapter V
127
Chapter VI
148
Chapter VII
173
Chapter VI
392
Chapter VII
421
Chapter VIII
437
Chapter IX
482
VOLUME III
514
Chapter I
515
Chapter II
531
Chapter III
560

Chapter VIII
194
Chapter IX
225
Chapter X
255
VOLUME II
273
Chapter I
274
Chapter II
300
Chapter III
331
Chapter IV
358
Chapter V
376
Chapter IV
593
Chapter V
627
Chapter VI
645
Chapter VII
668
Chapter VIII
692
Chapter IX
714
Chapter X
737
Endnotes
770
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2009)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was born in England on August 30, 1797. Her parents were two celebrated liberal thinkers, William Godwin, a social philosopher, and Mary Wollstonecraft, a women's rights advocate. Eleven days after Mary's birth, her mother died of puerperal fever. Four motherless years later, Godwin married Mary Jane Clairmont, bringing her and her two children into the same household with Mary and her half-sister, Fanny. Mary's idolization of her father, his detached and rational treatment of their bond, and her step-mother's preference for her own children created a tense and awkward home. Mary's education and free-thinking were encouraged, so it should not surprise us today that at the age of sixteen she ran off with the brilliant, nineteen-year old and unhappily married Percy Bysshe Shelley. Shelley became her ideal, but their life together was a difficult one. Traumas plagued them: Shelley's wife and Mary's half-sister both committed suicide; Mary and Shelley wed shortly after he was widowed but social disapproval forced them from England; three of their children died in infancy or childhood; and while Shelley was an aristocrat and a genius, he was also moody and had little money. Mary conceived of her magnum opus, Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus, when she was only nineteen when Lord Byron suggested they tell ghost stories at a house party. The resulting book took over two years to write and can be seen as the brilliant creation of a powerful but tormented mind. The story of Frankenstein has endured nearly two centuries and countless variations because of its timeless exploration of the tension between our quest for knowledge and our thirst for good. Shelley drowned when Mary was only 24, leaving her with an infant and debts. She died from a brain tumor on February 1, 1851 at the age of 54.

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