Practical Elements of Elocution: Designed as a Text-book for the Guidance of Teachers and Students of Expression

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Seite 169 - I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so good a commander with so slight, so drunken, and so indiscreet an officer. Drunk ? and speak parrot ? and squabble ? swagger ? swear ? and discourse fustian with one's own shadow ? O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil ! lago.
Seite 200 - It must be so — Plato, thou reasonest well ; Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; "Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man...
Seite 160 - Come in consumption's ghastly form, The earthquake shock, the ocean storm. Come when the heart beats high and warm, With banquet-song, and dance, and wine! And thou art terrible! — the tear, The groan, the knell, the pall, the bier, And all we know or dream or fear Of agony are thine.
Seite 198 - It must be by his death: and, for my part, I know no personal cause to spurn at him, But for the general. He would be crown'd: How that might change his nature, there's the question: It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; And that craves wary walking.
Seite 200 - He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns, But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight A second lamp in the belfry burns!
Seite 106 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
Seite 339 - For something better than she had known. The Judge rode slowly down the lane, Smoothing his horse's chestnut mane. He drew his bridle in the shade Of the apple-trees, to greet the maid, And ask a draught from the spring that flowed Through the meadow across the road.
Seite 138 - O satisfy us early with thy mercy; that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.
Seite 417 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.
Seite 201 - RING out, wild bells, to the wild sky, The flying cloud, the frosty light : The year is dying in the night ; Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.

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