Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
[graphic]

Bedford

13,286 14,927) 1391 9,437 4,755133,171) 37,3421 70,213 Berks

22,1041 25,0511 129 13,409) 7,5841 57,360 60,917 118,277 Buckingham 21,9291 25,2011 119) 13,933 8,424 56,208 61,4421 117,650 Cambridge 17,232 21,0221 93 12,831 5,303 50,7561 50,353/ 101,109 Chester

41,187 44,502 250 16,396 23,043 110,841 116,190 227,031 Cornwall

37,971 44,189 440 17,465) 10,954 103,310 113,357) 216,667 Cumberland 24,002 28,390 130 10,868 11,448163,4331 70,311 133,7441

35,658 37,4401 222 14,283 15,825| 91,494/ 93,993 185,487

62,318 79,415 766 33,044 30,977) 179,553 203,755 383,308 Dorset

23,210 26,821 171 12,982 9.607 57,717 66,976 124,693 Durham

29,033/ 39,288 152 10,288 17,094 83,6711 93,954 177,625 Essex

42,829 51,643 255 28,517 14,182 124,839 127,634 252,473 Gloucester

52,042 62,092 782 29,782 29,988 133,192 152,322 285,514! Hereford

18,57220,0811 154 12,599 5,044 46,404) 47,6691 94,073 Hertford

20,345 32,744 131 11,998 7,1921 55,0231 56,631 TII,654 \Huntingdon

7,566 8,808 231 5,3611 2,205) 20,402 21,806 42,208 (Kent

62,063 76,265 6281 27,077 27,996 183,500 189,595) 373,095! (Lancaster

144,283 161,899 807 23,305 114,522 394,104) 434,205) 828,309 Leicester

30,019 31,480 212 11,700 17,027 73,366 77,053 150,419) Lincoln

46,368 50,904 276 29,881 13,184 117,022 120,869) 237,891 Middlesex 130,613) 222,010 281 9,088135,398 434,633) 518,6431 953,276 Monmouth 11,766 12,543 7581 5,815 4,812 30,987 31,140 62,427 Norfolk

51,776 62,815) 275 31,454 23,082 138,0891 53,910 291,999 Northampton 23,318 30,860 1381 15,235) 12,100 68,279 73,074 141,3531 Northumberland 28,258 - 37,743 168 10,945) 16,5471 80,3851 Nottingham 38,344 33,514 164 12,293) 18,928| 79,057 83,843 162,9001 Oxford

22,702 25,006| 116 13,646 7,655) 59,132 60,059 119,191 Rutland

3,325 3,558 15 2,025 1,028 7,9311 8,4491 16,380

35,506 39,459 219 16,693) 16,7441 95,8421 98,456 194,298 Somerset

52,462 62,943 653 24,472 23,732 141,449) 161,731 303,180 Southampton 43,2 10 50,9761 441 21,401 18,0241 118,8551 126,2251 245,080 Stafford

55,080 62,537 423 18,561 34,011 148,073 147,080 295,153 Suffolk

37,2271 47,634) 155 26,406 15,180 111,988 122,223 234,211

55,434 72,559 1360 12,417) 35,160 151,871 172,040 323,8531 Sussex

29,5611 36,014 288] 19,778 10,7541 94,188 95,895 190,083 Warwick

44,940 49.066 308 15,111 29,775 109,539 119,196 228,73 51 Westmoreland

2,870 22,838 23,084) 45,922 Wilts

37,2441 41,844 234 22,657 14,8571 91,560 102,268 193,828 | Worcester

30,206 34,124 256 13,818 16,863 78,033 82,513) 160,546 York, E. Riding 30,3411 36,221 132 14,517 12,926 81,205) 86,148 167,353

N. Riding 32,776 35,856 123 16,570 10,864 74,68677,759 152,445
W. Riding 125,2641 133,601! 827 30,868 86,522 321,837) 331,4781 653,315

Totals 1,678,106 2,012, 39115188/697,353.923,58814,575,7634.963,06419,538,827

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Totals

119,398 129,756 1019 72,846 36,044 291,633 320,155) 611,788

IN the 27th Hen. VIII. c. 26. (A.D. 1535) an Act was passed “ for laws and justice to be ministered in Wales in like form as it is in this Realm,"

By this Act, the marhes or intermediate border-lands between England and Wales were divided into new counties, or annexed to old counties. The new counties were, Monmouth, which became an English county; Brecon, Denbigh, Montgomery, and Radnor, in Wales: the English counties auginented by annexations were Gloucester, Hereford, and Salop; the Welsh counties so augmented were Car digan, Carmarthen, Glamorgan, Merioneth, and Pembroke.

By the saine Act, the Chancellor of England is directed to issue a Commission Funder the Great Seal, to such persons as to him shall be thought convenient, to inquire and view all the said shires of Carmarthen, Pembroke, Cardigan), Monmouth, Brecon, Radnor, Montgomery, Glamorgan, and Denbigb; and thereupon to di. Juide them, and every of thein, into so many Hundreds as they shall think most meet and convenient, and the said Hundreds shall certify into the High Court of Chancery; which llundreds (after i he said Certificate) shall be used and taken as other Hundreds be in every other Shire within the Realm of England.

By a subsequent Act of 28th Hem. VIII. c. 3. three years are allowed for cor. rection of the allotment of places to the several Shires ; and by an Act of 31st Hen. VIII. c. 11. three years further are allowed. · Under the above Commission, and another Cominission for inquiry into the Welsh Laws and Customs, certain Ordinunces were framed, which were afterwards con. Grmed; as appears at the end of the Acts of 34th and 35th Hen. VIII, where they) are entered as an Act of Parliament.

SUMMARY

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

135,075 85,5851 103,9541 36,668 30,779 12,0331 23,4191 12,010 24,189) 62,966 148,607

28,108 101,272 107,264

1371

124

31,164

Aberdeen
Argyll
Ayr
Banff
Berwick
Bute
Caithness
Clackmanan
Dumbarton
Dumfries
Edinburgh
Elgin
Fite
Forfar

iaddington
Inverness
Kincardine
Kinross
Kirkcudbright
Lanark
Linlithgow
Nairn [land
Orkney&Shet-
Peebles
Perth
Renfrew [ty
Ross&Cromar-
Roxburgh
Selkirk
Stirling
Sutherland
Wigtown

[ocr errors]

COON

[ocr errors]

13,637 14,286 60,159) 74,916

3,419 40,675) 44,910 5,7851 11,354 48,506 55,448

2,195 16,465 20,203 3,124 2,013 14,466 16,313 1,214

5,545 6,488 838 10,608

12,811 5,7151

6,295 2,689 11,360 12,820 3,862

4,435

29,347 33,613 3,594 13,254

65,004

83,633 2,6351 1,886 12,411 15,7071 5,073 15,5641 45,9681 55,304) 4,980 13,6161 48,151

59,113 3,130

2,355 14,232 16,932 9,5941 3,294) 35,722 42,614 3,0701 2,059 12,580 14,859

4281 6401 3,466 3,779 2,662

1,8351 15,788 17,8961 5,387 27,672) 88,6881 103,0641 1,132 1,506 8,874) 10,577) 870

- 341) 3,530 4,721 1,218 20,151 26,002

4,846 5,0891 11,721 64,034

71,0591 15,959 41,960 50,6361 7,490 2,499 27,640 33,213 3,763 2,487 17,113 20,117 500

363/ 2,7; 3,139 2,425 5,912 27,7451 30,429

421 10,488 13,1411 3,375) 1,503 12,205 14,686

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

10

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

26,891

Totals

304,098 402,068 2,341

[ocr errors]

* The difference between the sum of these columns, and of the total number of families, give: the number of families who live without useful labor.

GENERAL

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

ENGLAND 11,678,106 2,012,391|15,188,697,353 923,588 4,575,763 4,963,0641 9,538,8271 WALES

119,398 129,756 1,019! 72,8461 36,0441 291,6331 320,155 611,788) SCOTLAND 304,093 402,068) 2,341 125,799 169,4171 826,191 979,497 1,805,6881 Army, Navy Marines,& Seamen ia

640,500 - - 1 640,500 Registered Vessels

Totals (2,101,597 2,544,215 18,548 895,998 1,129,049|6,334,0876,262,71612,596,803

SUMMARY OF BAPTISMS AND BURIALS IN ENGLAND AND WALES.

[blocks in formation]

1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1307 1808 1809 1810

120,521 116,508 237,029 101,352 103,082 204,434
139,489 133,948 273,837 99,504 100,385 199,889
150,220 143,088 294,108 102,459 101,269 203,728
150,583 144,009 294,592 91,568 89,639 181,177
149,333 142,868 292,201 91,086 90,154 181,240
147,376 144,553 291,929 | 92,289 91,163 183,452
153,787 146,507) 300,294 97,996 | 97,855 195,851
151,565 | 144,509 296,074 102,614 38,149 200,763
152,812 147,177 299,989 | 97,894 93,577 | 191,471
152,591 142,262 298,853104,907103,277 208,184

[ocr errors]

Totais. 11,468,6771,410,229/2,878.9001 981,639 968,550 11,950,1851

832,091.

The SUMMARY OF ENGLAND and WALES is collected from the Regisiers of eleven thousand one hundred and fifty-nine Churches and Chapels; and it is believed that no more than three or four returus remain due.- Many of the returns mention unentered baptisms, burials, and inarriages, to the following amount, viz.

Annual average number of unentered Baptisms 14,860—Burials 10,356% Marriages 195.

For For the Monthly Magazine. the foregoing formation, is a clay stratum OUTLINES of the MINERAL STRATA of of from one or two hundred to nearly

GREAT PRITAIN; by JOHN MIDDLETON, three hundred feet in thickness. Its coof LAMBETH.

lor at the top, and to the depth of five General Observations.

or ten, and occasionally to fifteen 'T VERY sort of stratum contains such or twenty feet, is a chesnut. At that

E concretions, in nodules or layers, depth, the fissures of this stratum become as are peculiar to itself. For instance : stained with sky blue; and, at thirty or Chalk contains black and glossy flint. forty feet from the top, the whole subPortland stone, and all other limestone stance of this clay is of a lead color. strata, contain Aint varying in color The depth of color increases with the from ash-grey to a dull black. Clay and depth of the stratum to a inuch darker all the argillacious strata contain scep. blue, or even to verge on a dull black. taria. And evei) sand has its iron stone, The chesout-colored part of this clay principally in layers. Most, or all, of the is used by the brick-makers, and that of stone strata are laminated; the upper a lead color by tile-makers. But the late beds of which are much thinner and inure ter is equally capable of being manufaceasily to be perceived than those at a tured into bricks of a red color. Though greater depth in the same stratum; the this or any other clay, on being mixed lower beds generally have tbe appear. with chalk, and the mixture washed, will aoce of more solidiiy as well as greater produce bricks, tiles, and other ear henthickness, but nevertheless they are in ware, of a pale sulphur or cream color. Javers. Even lava, trap, toadstone, and This blue clay contains septaria, (balls similar volcanic productions, are said to of indurated clay, iron, and spar,) in nohave finty nodules in abundance, and dules and layers, as well as occasionally sometimes of great beauty.

many crystals, resembling icicles, three The British strata are arranged nearly or four inches in length. These septaria in the following order:

balls, on being reduced by the hammer, 1. Vegetable mould, a foot or two in then burned in a lime kiln, and ground, thickness.

produce Parker's Roman cement, in a 2. Brick earth, a few feet in thickness, state of powder, which only requires the as in the brick-fields near London, and addition of about fifty per cent. of silimany other places, but by no means ge- ceous sand, previously washed till it is free nerally.

from animal, vegetable, and earthy, mat. 3. Beds of shells, sand, and gradel, ter, and then to be properly watered, from five to thirty feet in thick ness. worked, and used in a state of mortar, to These are exposed to view in the cliffs make an excellent-cement for walls of on the coast of Essex and Suffolk. The every kind. Or any sound wall, by being shells and sand have been mostly washed plastered over with it, receives a coat off in Middlesex and Surrey; but the which becomes an actual stone of the gravel, a few feet in Thickness, remains, harder kind, much more so than Portland and it is used for making and repairing stone. This stratum of clay also conthe roads. In some places it is a free tains, not far below the surface of it, the sandy gravel, and in other places it is tusks of elephants, the bones of aniinals, mixed with a chesnut-colored clay. The and petrified wood; and it prevails near greater part of the materials which com- the surface of the ground through Midpose this stratum have been formed in dlesex and Essex, the northern parts of The places where we now find them; hut Surrey, on the hills above Hurley, in suchi' of them as consist of rounded pets. Berkshire, at Hartley-row, and the north bles bave been fragments of older strala, side of the Isle of Wight, in Hampshire, broken and rolled to their present situa as well as in Buckinghamshire and Kent, tion by the ocean. This stratuin is known through Suffolk, Norfolk, and farther to extend over Middlesex and Essex; as northward along the east coast. well as the north side of Surrey, some very little water is inet with in this parts of Kent, Hertfordshire, Bucking- clay, and that is in every case of a bad bamshire, and Suffolk; it is also met with quality. When good spring-water is not at Hartley-row, on the road to Basiny- to be inet with above this soil, it is not stoke, at West-Cowes, on the north side of to be obtained without digging through the Isle of Wight, and many other places; it, as well as through a stratum of marine but wiib interruptions and displacements, shells, which lie under it, into the sandy by being occasionally waslied away. subsoil. Every interstice of that sand is 4. London clay. Immediately under full of excellent water, and it usually rises

in

« ZurückWeiter »