Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction

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Cambridge University Press, 18.10.2007
The Indo-European language family consists of many of the modern and ancient languages of Europe, India and Central Asia, including Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Russian, German, French, Spanish and English. Spoken by an estimated three billion people, it has the largest number of native speakers in the world today. This textbook provides an accessible introduction to the study of the Indo-European languages. It clearly sets out the methods for relating the languages to one another, presents an engaging discussion of the current debates and controversies concerning their classification, and offers sample problems and suggestions for how to solve them. Complete with a comprehensive glossary, almost 100 tables in which language data and examples are clearly laid out, suggestions for further reading, discussion points, and a range of exercises, this text will be an essential toolkit for all those studying historical linguistics, language typology and the Indo-European languages for the first time.

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Inhalt

1 The IndoEuropean language family
1
2 Phonology
27
Tocharian
37
Tocharian
38
Tocharian
39
Table 26 Frequency of reconstructed phonemes in PIE roots in
41
Old Church Old
50
3 Morphophonology
64
Sanskrit Greek Latin
96
5 Verbal morphology
114
6 Syntax
157
7 Lexicon and lexical semantics
187
Baltic Tocharian Albanian
193
relations by blood
202
mothers
203
relations by marriage
204

4 Nominal morphology
90
peku moveable property
208

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Seite 2 - The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists.
Seite 181 - If I stay here and fight beside the city of the Trojans, My return home is gone, but my glory shall be everlasting; But if I return home to the beloved land of my fathers, The excellence of my glory is gone, but there will be a long life Left for me, and my end in death will not come to me quickly.
Seite 181 - For my mother Thetis the goddess of the silver feet tells me I carry two sorts of destiny toward the day of my death. Either, if I stay here and fight beside the city of the Trojans, my return home is gone, but my glory shall be everlasting; but if I return home to the beloved land of my fathers the excellence of my glory is gone, but there will be a long life left for me, and my end in death will not come to me quickly.
Seite 90 - Greek, there were five cases (nominative, accusative, genitive, dative and vocative), three numbers (singular, dual and plural), and three genders (masculine, feminine and neuter).
Seite 130 - In the rest of this chapter, we shall examine some of the features reconstructed in the Greco- Aryan model in more detail, in light of the Anatolian material.
Seite 76 - Greek show that the accent was on the root in the singular and on the ending in the plural in the present active forms.
Seite 170 - But if this is the case, how are we to explain the minimal change in Paul's eschatology in the ten-year interval between I Thessalonians and I Corinthians (...)?" (S. 316). Ich hoffe gezeigt zu haben, daß „a maximal change" vorliegt, und vermute, Bairds Urteil beruht auf einer ungenauen Exegese von IThess 4,13ff (so S.
Seite 173 - Klein (1990: 90) on the grounds that it is 'virtually unfalsifiable' : 'given the possibility of the generalization of one form or the other in any given dialect, the argument remains forever impervious to the objection that a given dialect (say, Indo-Iranian, Italic or Anatolian) shows only one relative pronoun and gives no evidence of having ever had the other'.

Über den Autor (2007)

James Clackson is senior lecturer in the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, and is Fellow and Director of Studies, Jesus College, University of Cambridge.

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