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Total 3172648830 2985031 184520 5207211811754 2223035 44428 4557091375157 847953 590631 1866452 Total vote on A4 1 5633861

4034789

4680193

WOMAN SUFFRAGE.

WOMEN Voted for the first time in the United States in 1870. The Legislatures of the Territories of Wyoming and Utah having granted the right of suffrage to adult females, their votes were received at the ballot-boxes in the elections for Representatives in Congress, members of the Legislature, and county officers.

At the general election in Utah on the 1st of August, the Mormon and Gentile women voted for all the candidates. The number of votes cast by females was estimated by the Federal officials at about one third of the whole, or 7500.

In Wyoming, at the election on the 6th of September, women not only voted, but were candidates for office. The number of votes cast by women was estimated by the Territorial Secretary at 600. There were two women candidates. Mrs. Phoebe Picket was nominated by the Republicans of Laramie County for County Clerk, received 385 votes, and was defeated by 54 majority. Mrs. M. H. Arnold, Republican candidate for Superintendent of Public Schools, received 334 votes, and was defeated by 155 majority.

The Minnesota Legislature passed a bill February 23d, submitting the question of woman suffrage to the people; but it was vetoed by Governor Austin.

Woman suffrage was rejected in the Vermont Constitutional Convention by a vote of ayes 1, noes 225.

The Legislatures of Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa had the question before them, and decided in the negative by small majorities.

The first jury composed of women sat in Wyoming Territory, March 10th.

In the British House of Commons, Mr. Jacob Bright introduced a bill to confer the right of suffrage on women, and it passed to a second reading. On the 12th of May, it was laid on the table by a decisive vote, and virtually defeated.

A GLANCE AT THE TRADE.

GREAT HOUSES ENGAGED IN IT. THE MOST POPULAR FIRM.

ITS SPECIALTIES.

THE trade in proprietary medicines has already grown to colossal proportions, and there seems every reason to believe that each year will bring an increased demand for the numerous necessaries included under that name. It is easy to discover the cause of this; for in a country so sparsely populated in proportion to its size, first-class druggists are “few and far between," and the temptation to the ordinary trader in medicines to adulterate or pass off inferior drugs is so great that pure preparations are far from common. There is hardly a family, and certainly not a physician in the country districts, who has not, from time to time, found that perfect reliance can not be placed on the medicine supplied by his apothecary, even though made up on a physician's prescription. Complaints of this are constantly appearing in medical journals. This state of things, which brought into existence the proprietary medicine, has also concentrated in the hands of a few large houses this important trade. There are at present eight principal houses engaged in it, whose combined trade amounts annually to about $7,000,000. Of these four houses, John Fleming, of New-Orleans; F. C. Wells & Co., of New-York; Henry & Co., of Burlington, Vt.; and Collins Brothers, of St. Louis, do an annual trade of $400,000 each; two other houses, Johnston, Holloway & Cowden, of Philadelphia, and John D. Park, of Cincinnati, have a trade of $500,000. George C. Goodwin & Co., of Boston, surpass this, trading annually to the extent of $800,000. But these large sums appear small compared with the gigantic operations of John F. Henry, of New-York, successor to the house of Demas Barnes & Co. His trade, we are told, exceeds $3,000,000 yearly, and in hands so enterprising and successful the day can not be distant when it will reach a very much more important sum. The career of John F. Henry is an interesting chapter in the history of American enterprise, showing the gradual growth, under his influence, of one of the largest trades in the country-a growth from an unimportant position in an inland town of Vermont to the wide influence in this metropolis as the head of the leading house of the kind in the world.

Mr. John F. Henry's place of business is at No. 8 College Place, New-York. This entrepot for the prosecution of his extensive business is but indistinctly conceived of by those who do not buy proprietary articles by the gross or 100 gross. The whole store, from basement to roof, is devoted to the various departments of his business. On the first floor are found all the noted mineral waters of this country. The second, those articles known as "shelf goods." The third, or ground floor, is devoted to the business offices, giving to the

observer more the idea of a large banker's business being conducted; and the fourth to the most complete and varied stock of druggists' sundries, perfumeries, and toilet articles in the country. On the fifth story floor the case goods are found. On the sixth is the fac tory of the now famous carbolic salve. The top floor is also devoted to case goods. The building covers a lot of 30 feet front by 190 deep. It is admirably supplied with all the "modern improvements" of a great store, including patent elevators, steam-engines, etc. It is exceedingly well lit and ventilated, and in comfort and convenience may be taken as a model of store architecture.

Some statistics of particular medicines and preparations known as proprietary articles may be interesting as indicating their comparative importance and popularity. Tarrant's Seltzer Aperient is sold annually to the extent of $100,000, and Jayne's Alterative upward of $50,000. Hall's Balsam $100,000, and Drake's famous Plantation Bitters $700,000. Hostetter's Bitters are also popular to the extent of $1,000,000, and Hoofland's to $100,000. Of Helmbold's Buchu annually $500,000. Of McLean's Cordial and Ayer's Ague Cure are sold $100,000 each. Osgood's Chologogue also brings in $100,000; Burnett's Cocoaine another $100,000; and Kennedy's Discovery a similar sum. Boudault's Pepsine Elixir finds a patronage of $50,000, and Jayne's Expectorant of $100,000. It will doubtless be surprising to many to hear that an article apparently so unimportant as a fly-paper sells to the extent of $50,000. This is the annual receipt from Dutcher's Lightning Fly-paper, manufactured in St. Alban's, Vt. Brown's Preparation of Ginger $250,000, and Hall's Sicilian Hair Renewer, $400,000 annually. Another preparation, Sanford's Invigorator, $100,000; of Trask's Ointment, $50,000. In the pill department, $200,000 of Ayer's are sold, $150,000 of Brandreth's P. and R., $100,000 of Herrick's, $100,000 of Schenck's Mandrake Pills, $200,000 of Radway's, and $150,000 of Wright's. Ayer's Cherry Pectoral has a trade of $150,000, and Davis's Pain Killer of $150,000. There is a salve but recently introduced on the market; it is not yet quite twenty months old, and the sale of it has run up to 1,000,000 boxes within twelve months. This is the popular “ Carbolic Salve,” so useful for all cuts, sores, burns, or scalds, and, from a personal experience, should think it as indispensable in every family. Of the syrups, "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" stands first; its annual sale reaches $500,000. Smith's Tonic is next, $200,000. Of Schenck's Pulmonic, $100,000 worth is sold, and $50,000 worth is sold of the Peruvian Syrup and Scovill's Stillingia Blood Syrup. Ayer's Sarsaparilla stands first, at $150,000. Townsend's and Bull's follow, with $100,000 each. Sozodont is purchased to the extent of $100,000, and Brown's Bronchial Troches to $250,000. McLane's and Fahnestock's Vermifuges return $50,000 each. Constitution Water and Isaac Thompson's Troy Water return $50,000 each.

It will be seen that none of these articles bring in less than $50,000 annually, and that some of them reach as high as $250,000 to $500,000 and $800,000. These are the articles in constant demand; but they are, after all, but a small number of the long list of proprietary articles.

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ELECTION RETURNS,

BY STATES, COUNTIES, CONGRESSIONAL AND ELECTION DISTRICTS.

ALABAMA.

Governor,

1870.

Governor,
1870.

PRESENT STATE_GOVERNMENT.-Governor, Robert B. Lindsey; Lieutenant-Governor, E. H. Moren; Secretary of State, J. J. Parker; Treasurer, James F. Grant; Attorney-General, John W. A. Sanford; Auditor, R. M. Reynolds; Superintendent of Public Instruction, Joseph Hodgson; Commissioner of Industrial Resources, John C. Keffer.

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