Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Alabama - Local option, fee $175-$350.

Montana - Local option, semi-annna. $100-$300 Alaska-Prouibition under acts of Congress, Nebraska-Local option, fee $500-$1,000. Arizona - Local option, quarterly fee, Vuited Nevada -State license $50 per annull; wholesale Stales liceuse $25 annually. County and Ter- 8100 per annum; retail drugstore $13 per annun. ritorial $300 annually.

New Hampshire - License by majority of Arkansas - Local option, fee $800.

voters, fees based ou population, maximum California - Local opcion, fee by authorities. 81.200. Colorado-Local optiou, lee 8500 up. Connecticut - Local option, fee 8160 - $450.

New Jersey-Local option, fee $100-$300. Delaware License by courts, see $200-$300.

New Mexico - License by county commission. District of Columbia-Licease by excise buard

ec, lee $100 - $400. on the written consent of the majority of the New York-Larcul option in towns, fee $150owners of real estate, and of the residents on the $1,200, accordiug to population. front of the square on which the saloon is to be North Caroline Limited local option, semi. located, and of the owners of real estate and of annal lep of 500-$400. the residents of the confronting side of the oppo- North Dakota --Prohibition. site square, see $800.

Ohio - Local option, fee $1.000. Florida - Local option, fee $1.250.

Oklahoma-License hy county omicers, fee $200; Georgia-Total State Prohibition goes into eflect additional license in incorporated towns $500.

January 1, 1908. Law sigued Aug. 8, 1907. Oregon - Local option, fee $100.
Idaho-Annual license by authorities, fee $750. Pennsylvania - License under control of courts,
Illinols--Local optiou liceuse by city council or fee $70-$1,000.

village or county board, fee not less than $500. Rhode Island - Local option, fee $200-$1,000. Indiana-License by county commissioners, lee South Carolina-County control, State regula

-100-$250; majority remonstrance, defeals. tion. Lowa-License by petition of volers, iee $600. Sonth Dakota-License by local authorities, Kansas-Prohibition,

fee $400 - $600. Keniacky--License by majority of voters, fee Tennessee - License issued by local authorities, $100-$150.

see $150 - $200. Louisiana-State and local license. $100 up. Texas --License issued by connty clerk, fee $300. Maine-Prohibitiou.

Utah - License granted by local authorities, iee Maryland-Local option, fee $18-$450,

$100-$1,200. Massachusetts-Local option, lee not less than Vermont-License local option act was adopted

$1,000; number limited, one to one thousand in- February 3, 1903, and took elteco March 3, 1903.

habitants; in Boston, one to five humired. Virginia Control of local courls, see $175- $350; Michigan - Local optiou, fee $500 - 800.

local option provided for. Minnesota-License see, $500-$1.000.

Washington License issued by local authoriMississippi - Local option, fee $600 - $1.900.

ties, lee $300 - $1,000, Missouri -The counties may, hy majority vote, West Virginia - License hy courts and local au

pass the local option law, akit this is not doue, thorities, fee reinil 8000; wholesale $750, the connty courts muy grant a license and fix a Wisconsin- Local option, fee $100-$200, with tax of potless than $900, nór more than 400 per power in voters to increase from $200 $500. year, for State and not less than $ivo, nor more Wyoming--License issued by local authorities, ihan $500 for county purposes.

fee $100-$300.

.(ادا

LIQUOR TRAFFIC IN NEW YORK CITY. ('omparative tahle showing the number of licenses issued and net receipts under excise boards for year ending April 30, 1896 (old law), also number of liquor tax certitiates in force, net revenue, State's share net revenue, boroughs' share net revenue, benefit to boroughs by diminished State tax, together with total benetit to each borough comprising the City of New York, for the year ending April 30, 1:207 (new law).

Numbe
Number of Cert

Benefit to
Net Receipts

Boroughs'

Total
of
tifiantys

Stite', Share
Net Revenue

Share Set

Borongbe by
Under En

Benefit to
Licenses
in Force

Year Ending
Net Reven 11

Kevetive

Diminished BOROUGHS. else Beris,

Each Borough Issued,

Year Easting

State Tax
April 30,

Year Ending
1895-96
April 30, 1907

Year Ending
1895-90
1907

(New Law).
April 30, 1907

Year Ending
(Old

(old law).
(New
(New Law). Ap 1! 30, 1907

April 30, 1907
April 30. 1907

(New Law). )

(New Law). 1.9").

(New Law ). Manhattan

and Bronx.. 8,906 7,015 $1.034,013. 10 87,546,943. 59 83,773.471.88 $3,773,471.71'85,003,719 20 88,777.190.91 Brooklynl... 4,702 3,5.30 599,115. 89 3,427,671.91 1.713, 37.20 1,713.834.71 1,188.587.792,902.422. 60 Queens.

1,200 1,344 43, 124.61 475,905,03 237,952. 62 237.952.40 173,485. 29 411,437, 1,9 Richmoud. 0-131 479 88,364.83 170.234.25 87.112.21 87.112.04 61,234.95 186,366, 99 Total. * 15,3571 12,674 $1,736,918. 43 $11,620,744.77 $5,810.373.91 $5,810,370.88 $6,417,047. 23 $12,227.418 09 Table showing the

number of liquor lax certificates (coveriug hotels, saloous, clubs, etc.) in force April 30, 1907, by boroughs, in the City of New York. BOROUGHS.

Saioos,
Axloons,
Ilotrls.

BOROUGUS.

Ifotels.
Clubs, etc.

Clubs, e.c. Manhattan and the Bronx

825
5.138 Richmond

181

285 Brooklyn

378 2,988 Queens..

29
914 Total New York City.

1,643 9.328 Tuhen to Serve Beverages.

(From Osborn's Vintage and Production of Wines and Liquors.) Appetizer-Dry Pale Sherry plain or with a dash With Roast-(laret, Burgundy, or Chianti; tem. of bitters, Vermouth plain or a cocktail.

perature of room. With Oysters-Rhine Wine, Moselle, Dry Sau- With Game-Champagne (cold), Old Vintage ternes, or Capri; cool.

(hampagne; cool. With Soup-Snerry or Madeira; cool.

With Pastry-Madeira; cool. With Fish - Sauternes, Rhine Wine, Moselle, or With Cheese-Port; temperature of room. (apri; cool.

With Fruit-Tokay, Malaga, or Muscat; temperWith Entrées-Claret or Chlanti; temperature of ature of room. room.

With Coffee - Brandy or Cordlal; temperature of

room.

Spread of the ILiquor Prohibition Movement.

The year 1907 witnessed a tremendous advance in the United States in the movement to prhibit the sale of intoxicating liquors. It was practically the only political issue in the South. There

are

now six prohibition States---Maine, Georgia, North Dakota, Kansas, Oklahoma and Alabama, In eight States and Territories-Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Virada, l'tah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico --saloons are licensed with virtually 10 restrictions, although some of these have recently passed Sunday closing laws. In all the other States there is some form of local option. In nearly all these local option States the **dry" territory has been steadily increasing in the last ten years. In the South as a whole it has doubled; in Texas it has tripled; in Kentucky it has spread so widely that the prediction is confidently made that within three years the State will take its place beside Geurgia and Alabama in the prohibition column. To-day 97 out of the 119 counties of Kentucky are wholly “dry," and of the remainder only four are wholly "wet." Governor Willson was elected in November on a prohibition plaiform. This seems an extraordinary condition for Kentucky, the home of blue-grass whiskey, the State in which $100,000,000 is invested in distilleries.

In Tennessee liquor can be had publicly only in the cities of Memphis, Nashville, and Chattanooga.

Georgia becomes a prohibition State on January 1. 1908, and the law is so drastic that wine cannot be used at communion services in churches, nor can druggists sell any form of liquor except pure alcohol.

Alabama by act of the Legislature in November, 1907, became a prohibition State.

In Mississippi sixty-eight out of seventy-five counties are already dry, and a State prohibition campaign is being waged with every prospect of success.

Florida has thirty-four of its fonty-seven counties dry, and Governor Broward is actively leading a campaign for State prohibition.

South Carolina recently repealed its famous dispensary law and substituted local option by counties. A movement for State prohibition has been started, and seventeen out of fortyone counties have voted for no saloons.

North Carolina has no saloons in 95 per cent. of its territory, and the prohibition campaign is active under the lead of Governor Glenn.

Virginia has seventy-two dry counties out of 118.

West Virginia has thirty out of fifty-five, and Governor Dawson is actively fighting the liquor traffic.

Fourteen of Maryland's twenty-three counties are dry.

In Delaware the election in November, 1907, resulted in two of the three counties going dry.

Louisiana has eighteen dry parishes and parts of others are also dry, and it is Hlegal to solicit orders for liquor in any of the dry districts.

Arkansas has sixty out of seventy-five counties dry and many dry towns in the others.

Missouri's local option law has made forty-four of her 115 counties abolish saloons. Sunday closing even in St. Louis is rigorously enforced.

Texas is one of the most notable examples of the revolution, for 147 counties are absolutely dry, fifty-three are partly dry and only forty-seven are totally wet. The sale of liquor on dining-cars is forbidde and a traveller on a train may not even drink from his own flask.

Oklahoma has just adopted a constitution that forbids the sale of liquor.

Kansas is a prohibition State, and the last of the “speak easy" saloons has just been suppressed by popular opinion.

Nebraska has local option by villages and cities; 400 are dry, 600 wet.
South Dakota is about one-quarter dry.

North Dakota has been a prohibition State so long that in some of the counties there are no jails.

Minnesota has 123 dry towns and rigid Sunday closing.

Iowa, once a prohibition State, has sixty-five out of ninety-nine counties dry and eleven other counties have only one saloon each.

Wisconsin has 650 dry towns,
Michigan, under a county option law, has only one dry county.

A prohibition wave is rolling through Illinois, and more than 3,000,000 people are in the dry district.

Six hundred and eighty of Indiana's 1,016 townships are dry, and the prohibition advocates expect to increase the license fee to $1.000.

In io 1.110 of 1.376 townships are dry and 60 per cent. of the municipalities. Pennsylvania seems little affected by the temperance wave, but there is one dry county.

New Jersey has no local option, but has recently begun a vigorous closing of saloons on Sundays.

New York has township option, under which 602 towns in the State have no saloons. Only twenty-four towns in Vermont allow liquor to be sold.

New Hampshire is nominally a prohibition State, but only 62 per cent. of the population lives in really dry territory.

Massachusetts has 230 dry and 100 wet towns.

Connecticut has ninety-six dry towns out of 176, and every saloon must be run by its actual owner.

About half of Rhode Island is dry.

In Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona the Anti-Saloon League has started a campaign that has already resulted in the passage of a local option law in the first-named State.

In Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah, although the saloong run about as they like, they are beginning to realize that sentiment is changing. The Mormon Church is fighting them, and the prohibition people have already persuaded Idaho to adopt. a Sunday closing law.

On the Pacific Slope, California has four dry counties and much dry territory in the others, while in Oregon twelve counties are dry and 170 municipalities in the 21 wet counties are also dry. Washington has fifty dry towns,

The Canning and preserving Industry.

(From Census Bulletin No. 61.) of the total value of products of the canning and preserving industry for the United States, amounting to $108,505,471 in 1905, the largest item was canned vegetables, the value of which was $45,262,148, or 11.7 per cent of the total. Canned and dried fruits were next, with a value of $27,308,826. The value of fish amounted to $23,547,075, of which canned fish amounted to $10,953, 779), smoked fish to $2,362,740, and salted fish to $6,200,536. The value of oysters canned was $15.790, 412.

The following is a summary statement of the canning and preserving industry in the United States in 1903; Number of establishments, 2.703; capital, $70,082,078; number of salaried officials, clerks etc., 3,624; salaries. $3,236,138, wage-earners, average number, 50.238; total wages, $14.215,170; miscellaneous expenses, $8,590,984; cost of materials used, $70,038.686; value of products, $108,505,471.

Although some establishments, at which fruits and vegetables are packed during the Summer and oysters during the winter, are running the greater part of the year, the strict fruit and vegetable canning establishments are operated only during a part of the year. The tine in operation varies according to the locality and the kind of goods packed. While some plants are able to commence the canning of early peas and small fruits in the latter part of May, and others continue the packing of apples into December, the busy season for most comes during the months of July, August, Sepiember and October, September being the month of greatest activity. A comparatively small number of operatives are also employed during ihe Winter months in labelling, wrapping and packing-preparing the product for shipping-and in many factories where they manufacture their own cans the

canmakers are employed throughout the year.

The canning of vegetables is the most important branch of the canning industry, forming 36.1 per cent. of the total value of products in 1900, and 41.7 per cent. in 1905. In the value of products for this part of the industry Maryland ranked first and New York second, both in 1900 and 190.. Indiana was fourth in 1990 and third in 190.); Illinois was sixth in 1:100 and fourth in 1905, anil (allfornia dropped from third in 1900 to eighth in 1900.

The climatic conditions in Southern California have made the State famous for the fine quality of its fruits. The natural outcome has been to give this State first rank in the value of both canned and dried fruits produced. In 1900 California produced 61.9 per cent, of the total value of canned and 61.2 per cent. of the total value of dried fruits reported in the United States, In 1903, 59.9 per cent. of the total value of canned fruits for the country was reported from this State. while its percentage of the total value of dried fruits was increased to SS.1 per cent. of the total for the country. Maryland held second rank in the value of fruit canned, and New York ranked third in value of canned and second in value of dried fruits,

Mississippi led all the other States in value of oysters canned in 1905, producing $1.502,497. The other three leading States, ranked according to value of products, were: South Carolina, $588,239; Louisiana, $309,325; Georgia, $256,750.

CANNING PRODUCTION IN DETAIL The following are the returns of production in detail in 1905:

VEGETABLES. Tomatoes-Cases, 9,301.264; value, $13.887,169. Corn-Cases, 11,200,397; value, $15.952.066. Pcas Cases. 4.691,492; value, $7.928,7!.1. Beans-Cases, 2.517.540; value, $3.972.332. Pumpkins---Cases, 244, 157; value. $343,337. Sweet potatoes-Cases, 192,907; value, $284,383. Other-Cases, 1,213, 134; value, $2,894,068. Total value, $15,262,148.

FRUITS, Peaches--Cases, 1.302,876; value, $3,891,272. Pears--Cases, 788.675; value. $2,192.08.), Apricots-Cases, 538, 082; value, $1.638,719. Apples-Cases, 486,945; value, $732,128. Cherries-Cases, 317,366; value, $818,072. Plums-Cases, 208,313; value, $ 195,303. Raspberries --Cases, 177.227; value, $109, 152. Blackberries--Cases, 161,29; value, $285,482, Strawberrieg Cases, 141,527; value, $342,987. Other --Cases, $356, 152; value, $835,044. Total value, $11,644,042.

DRIED FRUITS. Raisins-Pounds, 121,409,881; value, $6,349,381. Prunes-Pounds, 117.808.181; value. $3,299,628. Apples--Pounds, 40,737,089; value, $1,758,610, Peaches-Pounds, 23,861,07 1; value, $1.702,205. Apricots--Pounds, 19.559,573; value, $1.410,838. Other-Pounds, 18,203,825; value, $1,144,122. Total pounds, 313,579,623; total value, $15,664,784.

CANNED FISH. Salmon-Pounds, 169,771,537; value, $11.813,321. Sardines--Pounds, 87,224.524; value, $4,380, 198. Shrimp--Pounds. 3,757,310; value, $345.716. Mackerel--Pounds, 1,568,450; value, $114.702. Crabs-Pounds, 223, 432; value, $59,753. Clams --- Pounds, 943,512; value, $54.729. Other-Pounds, 745,670; value, $63,175. Total pounds, 264,236,435; total value, $10,861,094.

SMOKED FISH, Herring-Pounds, 19,192, 262; value, $579.832. Salmon-Pounds, 6.633.560; value, $791.184. Finnan haddie--Pounds, 3.014,100; value, $171.234. Halibut-Pounds, 2,697,203; value, $27 1.118. Sturgeon--Pounds, 1,591.800; value. $345.760. Other--Pounds, 2,310,612; value, $197,592. Total pounds, 33,439,619; total value, $2,362,740.

SHELL FISH. Canned Products.Oysterg-Pounds, 53,935,107 : value, $3,415,186. Clamg-Pounds, 2,886.693; value, $219,426. Shrimp-Pounds, 1.330,08); value $133.215. Crabs--Pounds, 217, 424; value, $44.193. Other--Pounds. :84,565; value, $34,798. All other products, $139, 11j. Total pounds, 58,753,876; total valuo, $3,816,824. Aspregate value, $3,956,239.

Mortality Statistics. THE Census ofice published in 1906 a report of Mortality Statistics of States and cities which have laws or ordinances requiring the registration of deaths. It covered the years 1900 10 1904, inclusive, and in 1904 represented a population of 32, 998.989. The total numberof deaths reported was 551,354. the rate per 1.000 of the population being 16.7. But ten states and the District of Columbia with certain cities were included in the Regi-tration Area, The Census enumeration of 1900, which follows, covered the whole United States so far as returns could be obtained,

DEATHS IN THE UNITED STATES IN CENSUS YEAR 1900.

(Compiled from the Report of the Census Office.)

STATES AND TERRITORIES.
Total, Male. Female.

White, White, White, Colored,

Total. Xative. Foreign. Total. The Uuited States.

1.039, 094 551,611 487, 483 392,092 694,736 175, 252 147.002 Registration record

512, 669 272,819 239,8501 475, 640 337, 288 126, 465 37.029 Registration States...

301,670 157,715 143.925 292,618 210.918 78,077 (ities in registration States...

9,052 191, 667 100,011 91.626 184. 408 124,490 58,096 Rural part of registration States. 110.000 57.704 52,299 108, 210 86,428 19.981 1,7933 Registration cities in other states 210,099 115,074 95.825 183,022 126,370 48,388

27,977 Nou-registration

526, 125 278,792 247,633 416, 452 357,448 48,787 109,973 Alabama

25. 609 12,970

12,729 12,9337 12,308 341 Arizona

12,762 1, 2:23 750 473 947

681

219 Arkansas.

276 22,518 11.513 10.705 16,372 15.801

280 California

6,146 22,506 13,998 8,508 21,081 13,687

6,874 Colorado

1, 425 7,428 4,171 2,937 7,210

4,856 1,233

218 Connecticut.

15, 422 7.92 7,520 15,048 10.800 Delaware

3,941 374 3.075 1.644 1, 431 2, 1990)

2,134

236 585 District of Columbia 6.364 3,274 3,090 3,660 2, 189

616 Florida.

2.704 6. 182

3,320 2, 962 3, 408 2,943 381 Georgia.

3.074 26.941 13,321

13.020 13.094 12, 637 257 Idaho.

13,847 1,242 702 180 1.075 850 180 Illinois

107 61, 2:29 33,611 27,558 59,618 42:546 16,052 1.611 Indiana

33.560 17.454 16.132 32.312 Indian Territory

28.307 3,247 1.27+ 5,250 2.795 2,491 3, 9:36 3.863

37 Iowa....

1,350 19,573 10.6.2 8, 961

19,362 14.089 4.240 Kansas

211 16, 261 8.978

7.283

15.209 Kentucky

11.691 1,720 1.032 27,091 13,843 13,248 22.035 19.047 Louisiana

1, 221 6.0.56 20,955 10.971 9.981 10.250 Maine

8,465 1,670

10,705 12, 118 6,292 5,856 12,112 10,497 1,487

36 Maryland

20, 422 10,5:26 9.800 15,341 12,177 2.391 Massachusetts

5,081 49,756 2.).3.52 21,404 49.061 Michigan

34,952 13,645 69.5 33.572 18.084 15, 158 33. 205 24,068 Minnesota

8,752 367 17,005 9.354 7.651 16.816 10,318 6,285

189 20, 251 10,299 9,959 Missouri

7,120 150 12,807 38,081 20.480 Montana

17.00 34.959 29.383 4,771 3,125

2,188 1,387 801 1,930 Nebraska

1.069 534 258 8,264 Nevada.

4, 150 3,784

6,012 1,737 219 438 200

148
3419

201 New Hampshire..

137

89 7,400 3.663 3.737

7,388

5.848 New Jersey

1,077 32, 735 17, 462 15, 273 31,069 22,829 New Mexico

7,916 1,666 2,674 1,455 1,219 2,398 New York

2, 2:28

116 276 130, 268 69,618 61.620 127,3:32 88, 479 North Carolina

37,505 2.936 21.068 10, 427 10,01 North Dakota

13,217 12, 805

7,851 2,287 1,159 1.128 2.046 1.291 715 Ohio,

241 53,362 28.048 24,711 51,481 Oklahoma

40,219 9,356 1,881 3.181 1.741 1,440 2,704

2,563 113

477 Oregon 3.396 2,019 1.377 8.176 2,412 632

2:20 Pennsylvania

90, 1999 49, 150 41.049 86,653 67.229 16,354 3,546 Rhode Island

8,176

4.132 4,044 7.939 5,571 2, 295 2:7 South Carolina

17,160 8,161 8, 705 5. SOS 5.605 144 11,358 South Dakota 3,088 1,004 1.434 2,418 1.072

751 6.10 Tennessee

30,572 15,354 15,218 21,029 20, 257 5111 9,513

31,160 18,015 16,115 26,216 23.526 2,136 7,944 Utab. 3.079 1,821 1.2.68 2,972 1,934 983

107 Vermont 5.829 2,9:36 2,893 5.804 4.885 844

25 Virginia

25, 252 13.112 12.140 14.070 13, 472 439 11,182 Washington

4,010 3,148 1,762 4,594 3,085 1,211 316 West Virginia

9.588

5.0-16 4,5412 9.074 8.651 338 514 Wisconsin

24,928 13,815

11, 113 24,747 15, 298 8,974 Wyoming

181 767 45 315 651 474

137 116 The Census year ended May 31, 1900.

In the summaries of the results the data are classed as "registration" and "non-registration," according in the source from which the original returns were obtained. The non-registration class includes the areas in which the deaths were reported by the enumerators, and those areas in which registration was too defective to be accepted.

The average age at death in 1890 was 31,1 years ; iu 1900 it was 35. 2 years,

Mississippi

8,015

12

Texas...

97.4

MORTALITY STATISTICS-Continued.
The cities with a population above 100,000 showed the following death rates for 1900 aud 1810:

1900.
1890.
1900. 1690.
1900. 1890. 1

1900. 1890. Washington, .92.8 23 7 Rochester, X.Y....15.0 17.3 Louisville,

20.0 20.1 Cleveland

17.1 20.2 Boston

.20.1 23.4 Syracuse, N.Y.....18.8 19 6 New Orleans. .28.9 26.3 Coluitbus. .15.8 14.1 Fall River.. 93.2 Providence.......19.9 911 Baltimore ..21.0

99.9
Toledo

16.0 18.9 Worcester, Mass.,11.5 18.0 Los Ankeles, Cal..18.1 10. Minneapolis .10.8

13.5 Allegheny, Pa... 18.4 IN 2 Detroit 11.1 18.7 San Francisco.. 20.5 97.5 St. Paul...

9.7 14.9 Phíade hia 91.2 213 Jersey City 20.7

Denver
18.6 23.0 Kaunas ty .17.4 17.3 Pittsburgh

20.0 20.1 Newark, N.J. .19.8 27.4 Chicago

16.2
19.1 St. Joseph

9.1
Scranton, Pa.

1.8 Paterson, X.J.....19.0 27.2 New York 90.4 5.3 St. Louis

17.9 17.4 Memphis,...

25.1 25.3 Buffalo, N.Y. .14.8 18.4 Intianapolis... ..16.7 17.3 / Cincinnati, .19.1 21.0 Milwaukee

15.9 18 y * Estimated.

St. Joseph, Mo., with a death rate of 9.1 per 1,000, showed the lowest mortality, and Shreveport, Ia., with 45.5 the highest.

CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE CENSUS YEAR 1900. NUMBER OF DEATHS FROM CERTAIN CAUSES, WITH PROPORTION FROM EACH

CAUSE PER 100.000 FROM ALL CAUSES, IN 1900 AND 1890.

20.7

1900.

1890.

1900.

1890.

Old age

CAUREN OF DEATH.

CAUSE! OF DEATU.
Number.

Propor-
Xumber.
Propor-

Nurnber,

Propor-
Number

I'ropar-
tion,
tiun.

tion.

ti: D. (onsumption

111,0..9 10,688 102.199 1: 146 Diseases of the stomach 13.484 1,98 8080 960 Pneumonia.. 105,971 10,198 70.196 9,091 Meisles

12,866 1,238 9,256 1,100 Heart dis Set... 69,315 6,671 44,959 3,343 Croup.....

12,484 1,201

13,36%

1,447 Dlarrboal diseases 46,90: 4,514 47,201 5,610 Di 488 of the liver**

12,949 1,179

9,460 1,194 loknown causes

40,539 3.01

34,286 4,074 Diseases of the brain. 11,469 1,104 19,392 1,464 Diseases of the kidneyss 36,794 3,534 19,157 2,81% Inanition..

11,38:
1,095
6,996

831 Typhoid fever, ... 35,379 3,406 27.058 3.216 Dropsy....

11,064 1,084 10.070 1,197 Cancer 29.45 2,837 18,536 2,203 Whooping cough

9,958

958 8,432 1,002 29,292 2,812 16.591 1,972 Peritonitis...

7,601 722 4,495 594 Apoplexy 26,901 2,589 14,999 1,783 Railroad accidents

6,930

667 5,756 683 inflammation of the

Se ticætnia...

6,776 652 3,48 445 brain and meningitis.. 95,664 2,4:0 17,758 2,113 Burns and scalds

6.772

652

3,850 458 Cholera infantum.. 95,570 2.461 27,510 3.469 Scarlet fever...

6.333 609 5,969 l'ar:lyri-... 23,465 2,297 16,570 1,969 Suicide...

5,498 529 3,9:32 467 Bronchitis..

20,%23
1,916 21,492 2,546 Drowning.

5,357 518 6,104 607 Debility and atrophy 17,487 1,63 98,536 3,035 Appendicitis

5,111

49: luflumiza.

16, 15
1,60 12,957 1,340 kheurn tlsm..

5,067 488 4,508

536 Diphtheria .. 16,475 1.585 27,815 3,306 Habetes...

4,672 450 2,407

286 Coavulsions

15,5:5
1,492 16,598 1,978 Hydroe: phalus

414 4,338 516 Malarial lever..

11,874
1,431 18.591 9,210 Cerebro-spical fever. 4,174| 40 3,333

396 I'remature birth. 14,720 1,4171 7.636 900 Gunshot wounds..

4.060 391

2,552 303 • Including general tuberculosis. + Including pericarditis. 1 Including cholern morbus, colitis, diarrhoea, dysentery. and enteritis. $ Including light's disease. lloclud og general paralysis of the insane. lucluding gastritis, ** locluding jaundice, and inflammation and abscess of the liver.

This table serves only to indicate the relative frequency of deaths from the specified causes, as reported. It should be considered in connection with the following table, which gives the number of deaths due to the same causes in the registration area, with the death rates per 100,000 of population. DEATHS FROM CERTAIN CAUSES IN THE REGISTRATION AREA IN 1900 AND 1890, WITH DEATH RATES DUE TO EACH CAUSE, PER 100,000 OF POPULATION.

1900.
1890.

1900.

1890. CAUSES OF DEATH,

CAUSES OF DEATH.
Number. Rate. Xum ber. Rate.

Number Rate. Number Rate.

18.6

9,749

Pneumonia...
55,298 191.9 34,752 186.9 Diseases of the stomach **

5,743 20.0

3,565 18.1 Consumption 54,898 190.6 48,236 245.4 Diseases of the brain.... 5,357

1,055 30.9 Hvart diseaset.. 38,605 134.0 23,939 191.. Peritonitis....

5,078 17.5 3,419 17.4 Diarrhaal diseasest. 94,509 83.1 20,457 104.1 L'nknown causes..

4.849

16.8 4,997 24,6 Dis-ases if the kidneyss. 24,124 83.7 11,706

59.7Measles

3, 01 13.2

9,66% 13.5 Apoplesy

19,173

66.6
9,631
49.0 Rail oad accidents,

3,792

13.! 2,761 14.0 Cancer.. 11,296 60.0 9,410 47.9 Whooping cough.

3.6491 12.7 3,096 15.8 Old age.. 15,538 54.0 8,823 44.9 Suicide

3,400 11.8 2,027 10.3 Bronchitis 13,93 48.3 14,632 74.1 Barlet fever...

3,127 11.5 2,682 13.6 Cholera infantum.. 12,758 47.8 15,659 79.7 Hydrocephalus.

3.113 11.0 8,033 15.4 D-bility and atrophy 13,108 45,5 17,497 88.6 Drowning

3,152

11.0

2,543 12.9 Inflammation of the

Septicæmia...

2,667 10.0

1,511

7.7 brain and meningitis., 19,026 41.8 9,666 49.1 Appeodicitis..

2,858 9.9 Diphtheria 10.201 25. 13,786 70.1 Croup....

9.8 3,439

27.6 Typhoid fever. 33.8 9.097 46.3 Diabetes

2,693 9.4 1,089 5.5 Premature birth, 9.690 83.7 4,948 96.9 Burns and scalds.

2,515 8.9 1,081

8.5 Convalsions. 9.622 33.1 11,050 66.3 Malarial fever..

2,526 8.8 3,77 19.2 Paralysis ..

9,450

39.8
6,990 35.5 Cerebro-spinal fever. 9,039

1.241
Inanition...
7,859 27.3 6,445
27.1 Dropsy.

1,979 6.9 9,034 10.8 Influenza..

6.852
23.9 1,215 6. Rheumatiyin..

1,951 6.8 1,587 8.1 Diseases of the liver 6,514 92.7 4.742 94.2 Gunsbot wonnds.....

1,03

3.8 4:91 * Including general tuberculos s. + Including pericarditis. Including cholera morbus, colitis, diarrhoea, dysentery, and enteritis. $ locluding Bright's disease. I Tacluding general paralysis of the Insane. in famination and abscess of the liver. ** Including gastrit's.

Including jaundice, aud The following was the death rate per thousand in various countries in 1900: Austrla, 25. 4; Belgium, 19.3; Denmark, 16.9; England and Wales, 18,2; France, 21.9; Gerinan Empire, 22.1; Hungary, 28,9; Ireland, 19.6; Italy, 23.8; Netherlands, 17.8; Norway, 15.9; Scotland, 18, 5; Spala, 38.9; Sweden, 18.8; Switzerland, 19.3; United States (registration area), 17.8.

« ZurückWeiter »