Let Nobody Turn Us Around: Voices of Resistance, Reform, and Renewal : an African American Anthology

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2003 - 674 Seiten
This anthology of black writers traces the evolution of African-American perspectives throughout American history, from the early years of slavery to the end of the 20th century. The essays, manifestos, interviews, and documents assembled here, contextualized with critical commentaries from Marable and Mullings, introduce the reader to the character and important controversies of each period of black history. The selections represent a broad spectrum of ideology. Conservative, radical, nationalistic, and integrationist approaches can be found in almost every period, yet there have been striking shifts in the evolution of social thought and activism. The editors judiciously illustrate how both continuity and change affected the African-American community in terms of its internal divisions, class structure, migration, social problems, leadership, and protest movements. They also show how gender, spirituality, literature, music, and connections to Africa and the Caribbean played a prominent role in black life and history. To view the companion study guide, please click here http: //www.rowmanlittlefield.com/ISBN/0742527093
 

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LET NOBODY TURN US AROUND: Voices of Resistance, Reform, and Renewal

Nutzerbericht  - Kirkus

A comprehensive anthology of documents from colonial times to the present that tells "the story of how black people made themselves and interpreted the world in which they lived." Editors Marable ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Resistance Reform and Renewal in the Black Experience
xvii
FOUNDATIONS SLAVERY AND ABOLITIONISM 17891861
1
The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano Olaudah Equiano 17891
7
Thus both Ethiopia Stretch Forth Her Hand from Slavery to Freedom and Equality Prince Hall 1797
16
The Founding of the African Methodist Episcopal Church Richard Allen 1816
18
David Walkers Appeal 18291830
23
The Statement of Nat Turner 1831
35
Slaves Are Prohibited to Read and Write by Law
41
Adam Clayton Powell Jr and the Fight for Black Employment in Harlem
323
Black Women Workers during the Great Depression
325
Southern Negro Youth Conference 1939
331
A Philip Randolph and the Negro March on Washington Movement 1941
333
Charles Hamilton Houston and the War Effort among African Americans 1944
339
An End to the Neglect of the Problems of the Negro Woman Claudia Jones 1949
340
The Negro Artist Looks Ahead Paul Robeson 1951
351
Thurgood Marshall The Brown Decision and the Struggle for School Desegregation
356

What If I Am a Woman? Maria W Stewart 1833
42
A Slave Denied the Rights to Marry Letter of Milo Thompson Slave 1834
48
The Selling of Slaves Advertisement 1835
49
Solomon Northrup Describes a New Orleans Slave Auction 1841
50
Cinque and the Amistad Revolt 1841
52
Let Your Motto Be Resistance Henry Highland Garnet 1843
58
Slavery as It Is William Wells Brown 1847
64
Aint I a Woman? Sojourner Truth 1851
67
A Black Nationalist Manifesto Martin R Delany 1852
69
What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? Frederick Douglass 1852
87
No Rights That a White Man Is Bound to Respect The Dred Scott Case and Its Aftermath
91
Whenever the Colored Man Is Elevated It Will Be by His Own Exertions John S Rock 1858
110
The Spirituals Go Down Moses and Didnt My Lord Deliver Daniel
114
RECONSTRUCTION AND REACTION THE AFTERMATH OF SLAVERY AND THE DAWN OF SEGREGATION 18611915
117
What the Black Man Wants Frederick Douglass 1865
125
Henry McNeal Turner Black Christian Nationalist
131
Black Urban Workers during Reconstruction
134
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Pioneering Black Feminist
138
Labor and Capital Are in Deadly Conflict T Thomas Fortune 1886
143
Edward Wilmot Blyden and the African Diaspora
146
The Democratic Idea Is Humanity Alexander Crummell 1888
157
A Voice from the South Anna Julia Cooper 1892
167
The National Association of Colored Women Mary Church Terrell and Josephine St Pierre Ruffin
173
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Paul Laurence Dunbar
178
Booker T Washington and the Politics of Accommodation
181
William Monroe Trotter and the Boston Guardian
198
Race and the Southern Worker
201
Ida B WellsBarnett Crusader for Justice
209
William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
212
The Niagara Movement 1905
227
Hubert Henry Harrison Black Revolutionary Nationalist
230
FROM PLANTATION TO GHETTO THE GREAT MIGRATION HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND WORLD WAR 19151954
235
Black Conflict over World War I
242
If We Must Die Claude McKay 1919
245
Black Bolsheviks Cyril V Briggs and Claude McKay
246
Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association
259
Women as Leaders Amy Euphemia Jacques Garvey 1925
274
Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance
276
The Negro Woman and the Ballot Alice Moore DunbarNelson 1927
287
James Weldon Johnson and Harlem in the 1920s
290
Block Workers in the Great Depression
295
The Scottsboro Trials Mils
302
You Cannot Kill the Working Class Angela Herndon 1933
303
Hosea Hudson Black Communist Activist
313
Breaking the Bars to Brotherhood Mary Mdeod Bethune 1935
320
WE SHALL OVERCOME THE SECOND RECONSTRUCTION 19541975
365
Rosa Parks Jo Ann Robinson and the Montgomery Bus Boycott 19551956
376
Roy Wilkins and the NAACP
386
The Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1957
391
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Sitin Movement 1960
395
Freedom Songs 1960s
396
We Need GroupCentered Leadership Ella Baker
398
Martin Luther King Jr and Nonviolence
400
The Revolution Is at Hand John R Lewis 1963
407
The Salvation of American Negroes Lies in Socialism W E B Du Bois
409
The Special Plight and the Role of Black Women Fannie Lou Homer
419
SNCC Position Paper Women in the Movement 1964
422
Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam
425
Malcolm X and Revolutionary Black Nationalism
427
Black Power
442
CORE Endorses Black Power Floyd McKissick 1967
458
To Atone for Our Sins and Errors in Vietnam Martin Luther King Jr 1967
461
Huey P Newton and the Black Panther Party for SelfDefense
468
The People Have to Have the Power Fred Hampton
479
I Am a Revolutionary Black Woman Angela Y Davis 1970
482
Our Thing Is DRUM The League of Revolutionary Black Workers
486
Attica The Fury of Those Who Are Oppressed 1971
489
The National Black Political Convention Gary Indiana March 1972
491
There Is No Revolution Without the People Amiri Baraka 1972
496
My Sight Is Gone But My Vision Remoins Henry Winston
503
THE FUTURE IN THE PRESENT CONTEMPORARY AFRICANAMERICAN THOUGHT 1975 TO THE PRESENT
509
We Would have to Fight the World Michele Wallace 1975
519
Combahee River Collective Statement 1977
524
Women in Prison How We Are Assata Shakur 1978
529
Its Our Turn Harold Washington 1983
535
I Am Your Sister Audre Lorde 1984
537
Shaping Feminist Theory bell hooks 1984
544
The Movement against Apartheid Jesse Jackson and Randall Robinson
550
The Ghetto Underclass William Julius Wilson 1987
557
Keep Hope Alive Jesse Jackson 1988
567
Afrocentricity Molefi Asante 1991
577
The Anita HillClarence Thomas Controversy 1991
588
Race Matters Cornel West 1991
594
Black AntiSemitism Henry Louis Gates Jr 1992
601
Crime Causes and Cures Jarvis Tyner 1994
606
Louis Farrakhan The Million Man March 1995
615
A Voice from Death Row Mumia AbuJamal
618
Let Justice Roll Down Like Waters AfricanAmerican Prisoners in Sing Sing 1998
619
Black Radical Congress 1998
625
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Über den Autor (2003)

Manning Marable is professor of history and the founding director of the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University. Leith Mullings is Presidential Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York Graduate School.

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