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EXCURSION AND LUNCH.

The Street-Railway Presidents of Washington invited all who were in attendance upon the Convention with their ladies to enjoy an excursion to Mount Vernon on Friday.

The steamboat, W. W. Corcoran, was chartered for the occasion, and, with the Marine Band on board, left the wharf about ten o'clock. The weather was charming, and after a delightful sail of an hour and a half, were landed at Mount Vernon, the birthplace and tomb of Washington.

At this hallowed place an hour or more was spent in the inspection of all that was abounding in interest to every American citizen.

The party then sailed across the river to Marshall Hall, where a bounteous lunch was awaiting the entire party. Gentlemen accompanied with ladies were seated in an open air pavilion, while those unaccompanied were seated at adjoining tables under the neighboring trees. A bounteous repast was spread, of which all partook with zest, the invigorating sail and the effort of sightseeing having given everbody keen appetites.

REMARKS OF PRESIDENT CHARLES B. HOLMES. At the close of the repast, the retiring President, Mr. Charles B. Holmes, spoke as follows:

MR. HOLMES: Ladies and Gentlemen—There are times in the lives of all men and all women, when words seem very cheap, poor and inexpressive things. It

may be that in the far future, and in the higher development of our race, we shall find a language which will express the sentiment of the heart. But I know this, that there is not a delegate of this Association, or any friend who has come with him, who will feel that when we say, thank you ” to the friends who have done so much to make our stay pleasant and enjoyable, that we have begun to express the sentiments of our hearts. [Applause.) In all our travels, East and West, we have never met friends, great-hearted, cordial friends, who strove more earnestly to make every hour of our stay with them full of good-fellowship and pleasure. We are grateful. We only wish that we had a language which would express our gratitude; but we cannot say more to you, friends, than that we shall always remember, with grateful hearts, all that you have done for us. When you come and see us, we will try to express our gratitude in the same grand and cordial way in which you have shown us your good will. [Applause.]

And here I presume I ought to stop ; for having passed, as we all have to-day, through such sacred surroundings, words are still more inadequate to express the sentiments of the heart. The flood-gates of sentiment have been opened and our hearts have been filled full. To many of us, it was the first opportunity we have had of visiting that sacred place, where are enshrined the ashes of him who was the Father of his Country; we shall never forget that sacred place; we shall never forget this blessed day. We are grateful to our friends who have given us this rare opportunity, one that will ever remain enshrined in our hearts and in our memories as one of the most grateful opportunities of our lives. Friends we thank you for it ; for this grand opportunity, that we may be enabled to realize more and more, than we have ever done before, the greatness of that great man. [Applause. ]

As we came along the river, and our gallant boat made its way through those beautiful waters, sparkling in the sunlight of this glorious day, we noticed that the boat had only passed, when the waters were smoothed over, and no mortal would ever know that any keel had ever parted the smooth surface. And so it is with human existence ; millions and millions of us commoner beings pass along the stream of life, and leave no mark to show that our lives were ever lived. But that great man whose tomb we have visited to-day has left behind him a pathway that grows brighter and grander as the years go on, and the centuries to come will revere his name more highly than do we. [Applause.] Thus his name among the nations of the earth will stand higher than any words of any language can express.

To everyone who loves Republican institutions, I am sure it is pleasing to mark the plain simplicity of that spot. There are places in our world where palaces have been reared ; and every palace meant a million hovels for the poor ; every palace meant that multitudes without end must go without the comforts of life; but that man had no such palace as that. His life was dedicated and devoted to the love of his fellow-man, to make the world better for his having lived in it. And his memory is enshrined in our hearts, and will be in all hearts so long as the sun shall shine, because he lived an unselfish and noble life, because he lived an active, courageous life that was devoted to humanity and the service of his country and his God. [Applause.] I thank you for your kind attention ; and I would request all those who feel in their hearts a sense of gratitude to our friends who have done so much for us, to express it by rising.

Everybody arose ; and someone proposed three cheers for our Washington friends, which were given heartily, with a "tiger."

The entire party for the balance of the afternoon gave themselves up to speech-making and dancing, all being determined upon enjoying themselves to the utmost.

It was the unanimous vote of all that the day's enjoyment had been a great success, the recollection of which would be ever fresh and green in the memory of all who had had the rare privilege of participating therein

SPECIAL COMMITTEES, 1889.

STREET-RAILWAY MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE.

C. C. WOODWORTH, Sec., Rochester City and Brighton K. R. Co., Rochester,

N. Y.
R. DUDLEY FRAYSER, Sec., Memphis City Ry. Co., Memphis, Tenn.
4. C. Moss, Sec. and Treas., Sandusky St. R. R. Co., Sandusky, O.
C. DENSMORE WYMAN, Vice-Pres., Central Park, North and East River R. R.

Co., New York, N. Y.
V. CRCNYN, Pres., London St. R. R. Co., London, Ontario.

A STREET-RAILWAY EMPLOYEES' MUTUAL BENEFIT SOCIETY.

HENRY Hurt, Pres., Washington and Georgetown R. R. Co., Washington,

D. C.

THAT

HOW CAN PUBLIC SENTIMENT BE BEST CULTIVATED, SO

CORPORATIONS MAY RECEIVE EQUITABLE TREATMENT ? G. Hilton SCRIBNER, Pres., Central Park, North and East River R. R.Co.,

New York, N. Y.

STREET-RAILWAY MOTORS OTHER THAN ANIMAL, CABLE

AND ELECTRIC.
H. H. WINDSOR, Sec., Chicago City Railway Co., Chicago, Ill.

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THE CONDITIONS NECESSARY TO THE FINANCIAL

ELECTRICITY AS A MOTIVE POWER.

THOMAS C. BARR, Pres., People's and Lombard and South Street Passenger

Railway Companies, Philadelphia, Pa.

THE FOOD AND CARE OF HORSES.

GEORGE G. MULHERN, Supt., Woodland Avenue and West Side Street R. R ,

Cleveland, O.

THE NEXT REGULAR MEETING.

The next regular (annual) meeting of the Association will be held in Minneapolis, Minn, at the West Hotel, the third Wednesday in October (the 16th), 1889.

THE CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS

OF THE

AMERICAN STREET RAILWAY ASSOCIATION.

THE CONSTITUTION.

NAME.

I. The name of the Association shall be The American StreetRailway Association, and its office shall be at the place where the Secretary resides.

OBJECT.

.

JI. The object of this Association shall be the acquisition of experimental, statistical and scientific knowledge, relating to the construction, equipment and operation of street-railways, and the diffusion of this knowledge among the members of this Association, with the view of increasing the accommodation of passengers, improving the service and reducing its cost; the establishment and maintenance of a spirit of fraternity among the members of the Association by social intercourse, and the encouragement of cordial and friendly relations between the roads and the public.

MEMBERS.

III. The members of this Association shall consist of American Street-Railway Companies, or lessees, or individual owners of street-railways; and each member shall be entitled to one vote by a delegation presenting proper credentials.

AMENDMENT.

IV. This Constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote of the members present at a regular meeting, after the proposed amendment shall have been submitted, in writing, at the preceding regular meeting and a copy sent to each of the members.

THE BY-LAWS.

APPLICANTS.

1. Every applicant for membership shall signify the same, in writing, to the Secretary, enclosing the requisite fee, and shall sign the Constitution and By-Laws.

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

II. The Officers shall consist of a President, three VicePresidents and five others, who shall constitute the Executive Committee, and a Secretary and Treasurer. The Executive Committee shall have the entire charge and management of the affairs of the Association. The Officers and Executive Committee shall be elected by ballot, at each regular meeting of the Association, and shall hold office until their successors shall be elected. The duties of Secretary and Treasurer shall be performed by the same person. The Secretary and Treasurer shall not be a member of the Executive Committee.

DUTIES OF OFFICERS.

III. The officers of the Association shall assume their duties immediately after the close of the meeting at which they are elected; they shall hold meetings at the call of the President, or, in his absence, at the call of the Vice-Presidents, in their order, and make arrangements for carrying out the objects of the Association.

PRESIDENT.

IV. The President, if present, or, in his absence, one of the Vice-Presidents, in their order, if present, shall preside at all meetings of the Association and of the Executive Committee.

TREASURER.

V. The duties of the Treasurer shall be to receive and safely keep all moneys of the Association ; to keep correct accounts of the same, and pay all bills approved by the President; and he shall make an annual report to be submitted to the Association. He shall give a bond to the President in such sum, and with such sureties, as shall be approved by the Executive Committee.

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