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they were conquered by France, the modern Sodoms and Gomorrahs of Europe; all the vices more peculiarly degrading to human na! ture, some of which are held in abomination by álmost al other states civilized or uncivilized, christian or beathén, there reigned triumphant: they were not only habitations of vice; but of cruelty. Modern travellers estimate the number of assassinations in the city of Naples aloue, at 11,000 annually. Such were the effects of the - assumed power” of the church of Rome, in which the toleration of crimes has produced a find of wealth to the priesthood, and ab. solution has been granted to the most abandoned of the human race, the pests of society.,

The crimes which have marked some of the periods of the French Revolution, have, by their being fperpetrated immediately before our eyes, and by the use - made of them by crafty politicians, who when they have their own ambitious ends to answer, prove they can aet in a manner equally criminal;—the erimes of some of the French statesmen have so appalled the people of this country, and of Europe, as frequently to occasion the general exclamation. Such

crimes are unparalleled!” Had the people who thus éxclained, only turned over the pages of ecclesiastical history, they would have been convinced of the horrid truth, that no crimes have paralleled those of the papal see. The worst of men who have ever existed since the creation of the world, were, and that for a long succession, the Popes of Rome; who were such a compound of every species of wickedness, that, however justly we may hold in abliorrence the lives and the actions of those men of blood, ROBESPIERRB and MARAT, the latter may with truth be pronounced comparatively virtud ous characters.* The grand source of all these crimes was "the « union of the two powers, the spiritual and temporal," the fatal consequences of which have been from that day to the present, in cessant disorders ; « those spiritual princes having studied nothing " but to augment the influence of a power which enabled them to * support and maintain the assumption of all others." The fall therefore of such a long established despotism, although it may be lamented by those corrupt politicians who have been in the habit of elassing it with other despotic systems amongst the "regular govern. « ments of Europe," is an event which affords matter for satisfaction and triumph to every friend to the moral interests, and the civil and

* Baronius (a popish historian) acknowledges that for a succession of ffty Popeś, not one pious or virtuous man sat in the pontifical chair: many of them were whoremongers and murderers; many others, adds the historian, were hominum portenta, monsters of men: there were eighteen popes successively one after another that were magicians, and in league with the

devil. Another eminent popish writer owns-“There were scarce any sins - "except that of heresy, which the bishops of Rome were not guilty of!''

religious rights of mankind; and to the christian, he who is not merely nominally, but really such, no event that has taken place for many centuries past, is more calculated to confirni liis faith in divine revelation, and in the consoling doctrine of a superintending Providence. The predictions respecting Antichrist, abounding in the New Testament, have (till at least within these few years, when the inclinations of certain time-serving priests have led them to adopt a different interpretation) by the generality of protestant divines of all churches and sects, been applied to the church of Rome, which has been justly considered as the grand apostacy from the christian faith: the fall of that church bas been for ages the uniform subject of the most ardent prayers of pious protestants of all denominations. Several of the prelates, and other eminent divines of the established church of England have been distinguished as champions in defence of their common fajth: they rejoiced to see, although at a distance, the day on which the church of Rome should be prostrated in the dust; and they have contemplated such an event as one of the most important, splendid, aud glorious accomplishments of inspired prophecy. It must, however, be acknowledged, that the generality of our protestant divines in the present day, appear to entertain differ rent sentiments and feelings. As the period for the accomplishment of the predictions respecting the church of Rome has more Dearly approached, these divines, instead of congratulating the christian world, have manifested much dissatisfaction and uneasi. pess; their hopes and wishes have attended certain projects, one of the ends of which is the “ the restoration of the two powers, the spi* ritual and temporal in the Pope of Rome,”*. Were we to inquire into the reasons of their conduet on this occasion, the subject would, we fear, suggest some mortifying reflections. It might perhaps be suspected, that the priests of other establishments besides, those of Rome, are conscious that some of the marks by which the grand apostacy has been distinguished, are too visible in their respece tive churches. It might be asked, whether all have not, to use the

expressive language of inspiration, drank of the wine of the fornicaiţion of the whore of Babylon : --whether, as the reign of the only

rightful head of the christian church, the King Messiah approaches, they are not somewhat apprehensive that the grand, the PRIMEVAL CORRUPTION of christianity--HUMAN AUTHORITY OVER CON SCIENCE, that mystery of iniquity which began to work long before its complete developement at Rome ;--wliether the “ union « of the two powers the spiritual and temporal,” by which the established priesthood in all countries inveigled the civil magistrate to create, support, and maintain that " assumption of powers**

See the Proclamation of the Archduke John. Pol. Reg. Vol. V. p. 439,

wbich bave been embodied and exercised under the term “ Alliance

between Church and State;"whether this “ alliance" together with the dumberless corruptions which have been the fatal consequence, and which still abound in different degrees in all churches dependent on, and supported by the civil power, may not be destroyed by the brightness of the coming of the great Sovereign of the church, whose prerogatives have been so long invaded ?-Disa missing these unpleasant inquiries, we beg leave to express to our readers, and to the world, on this occasion, our own satisfaction and exultation as BRITONS, as PROTESTANTS, and as CHRISTIANS.

The generality of christians it is to be feared, scarcely allow themselves to consider the END which thus appears to be accomplished, but are almost wholly intent on the instruments and means by which it is accomplished. With respect to the motives, and views of NAPOLEON, and the measures he is pursuing for the advancewent of his ultimate designs, we have little to say in their favour: bis own vast ambition is doubtless the main spring of his actions: the Almighty Governor of the World appears to have designed in the course of his Providence, that those disorders which have attended the rise, progress, and establishment of despotic governments, shall likewise, in different degrees, mark their fall; and in all ages of the world, froin the days of PHARAOH to those of NAPOLEON, he has raised up those men to bring about events the most important, whose characters, plans, and ultimate designs place them in the eyes of every friend to virtue and goodness iu no favourable point of view: but this consideration, however humbling it may be to the pride of man, ought by no means to hinder the exercise of that satisfaction which naturally arises in the minds of good men on the accomplishment of those ends. The design of the Almighty in all his dispensations, appears to be, to reserve the hori nour due to himself, that no flesh should glory in his presence. On such an event, therefore, as the fall of the church of Rome, it is impossible for us to refrain from congratulating the christian world. The accomplishment of the divine predictions, declared by the he ralds of the christian dispensation, eighteen centuries ago, causes light to arise out of darkness; and amidst the corruptions and disorders of society, this light enables us to rejoice that we live in an era so distinguished. We call on every true christian to join us in the exulting language of the evangelist, when he beheld in vision the grand scenes now passing before our eyes:--Rejoice over her thou heaven, and ye holy Apostles and Prophets, for God hath avenged you on her! ..... We give thee thanks, O Lord God Almighty, which art, and wast, and art to come, because thou hast taken to thee thy great power and hast reigned! .... Great and marveltous are thy works Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy

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O'ILICIT BEAIHIN,

. PREFA Ç E.

DURING the last session of parliament the house of Com. mons was so much employed in the important Inquiry re. specting his Royal Highness the Duke of York, and in altending to various corrupt practices in our public men, that the attention of ministers was principally occupied in devising the best means of preventing the effects of some of those inquiries, and of stilling the rest. They were, as usual, supported by large majorities, and after a stormy session, appeared secure in their respective places. .

As the year advanced, the triumphs of NAPOLEON at. tracted their attention. To arrest his progress, and to afford to their own country, and to Europe, a display of iheir talents, and of the skill of their chosen commanders, Sir

A. Wellesley, and Lord Chatham, the expeditions to Spain ‘and Walcheren were contrived, and carried into execution. The effects of this united exertion of talent are now fully displayed to the public! , ,,

That disaster and disgrace should be the only effects of our councils, cannot, when we reflect on their distracted nature, excite much surprise. Weakness, incapacity, rashness,' in attention to the lessons of experience have characterised the conduct of both counsellors and commanders.

Whether these disasters and disgraces, and a waste of British resources, and British blood, almost unparalleled, will awaken the serious attention of parliament remains to be seen. When we, however, reflect on the increased and continually increasing venality and corruption of the times, and the supineness of the people, we confess, we entertain but slender hopes that any effectual inquiries will take place, 3.1 Public attention has been somewhat diverted from that reflection our situation so imperiously demands, by the circungstance of the tools of ministers having contrived the observance of a Jubilee, on account of bis Majesty entering on

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