A History of Crime in England: From the accession of Henry VII to the present time

Cover
Smith, Elder, 1876
 

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Inhalt

Relics of the old institution of villenage
81
instance
85
Tone of judges towards prisoners
92
effect upon the turbulent
98
Connexion of naval enterprise with the history of crime
104
Effects of the general progress seen at the end of the Tudor period
112
REFERENCES AND NOTES TO CHAPTER VI
113
Official account of its discovery
118
the last burning of heretics in the reign
124
Projected burning of heretics in the reign of Charles I
125
Compurgation and superstition
131
brawls in churches
139
Application of chemistry to crime Murder of Overbury
145
His keen moral perception displayed in his pathetic confession
151
Causes of the quarrel between king and parliament
160
CHAPTER VIII
168
Treason against the Keepers of the Liberty of England
170
abolition of the punishment
177
Political and physiological bearing of this Act and of the subject with
183
New attempts to diminish drunkenness
189
The suicides of the period illustrate an immutable physiological law
195
Trial of the regicides
201
popular exaggerations
213
Oatess origin and early training
220
Oatess credit established by the conviction of Coleman
228
The ancient habit of partisanship shown throughout the career of Oates
234
Colonel Blood
240
Compromise between the principles of the Commonwealth and those
248
Clandestine marriages in the sanctuaries and elsewhere
254
State of England compared with that of foreign countries at the end
260
Comparison of smugglers and river thieves with knights who robbed
265
the pirates laws pirates and crusaders compared
266
Ancient tendencies shown in the prevalence of highway robberies
274
Parsons Turpin Sheppard the Waltham Black Act
280
the pillory instances
287
Many ancient restrictions on commerce still enforced
294
Corruption of statesmen and forgery disclosed by enquiries into
306
Conduct of Sir Robert Walpole
312
Conduct of Pelham
313
Reform effected in Chancery through the growth of commerce
319
their relation
384
importation of base coin
392
the labour laws
398
Progressive changes in the tone of society and in the criminal laws
406
Improvement of internal communications canals roads etc in relation
407
Relation of the extremely rich to the extremely poor important in
412
Pauperism an inherited vice not easily eradicated
419
The alleged increase of drunkenness not confirmed by the statistics
426
Is drunkenness a cause of crime?
433
Is instruction the cause by which treason murder highway robbery
441
successive changes in its applications
447
Changes in prison discipline associated with other changes of punish
453
Progressive increase of police force in proportion to population
462
Diminution of homicide shown by verdicts at coroners inquests
468
They have nevertheless diminished
474
General sense of security in spite of temporary and local exceptions
480
Stipendiary magistrates
483
CHAPTER X
489
Psychological aspect of instincts preferences and sentiments affecting
495
Ideas of right and wrong
504
The history of crime illustrates the gradual restraint of the fiercer
510
And by the localities of crime and the birthplaces of criminals
516
And by comparison of the crimes of women with the crimes of men
526
Tendencies
532
Those influences have differed and will differ at different times
538
Stateinstruction might thus effect a revolution by which the criminal
545
The state may fairly demand that obedience to its laws shall be taught
553
Crime and Pauperism in immediate relation to the Lawsto
559
Labour should be presented to ablebodied paupers and criminals as
568
Ill effects of all cruel public punishments
574
recent development of the doctrine of insanity
580
want of selfcontrol a cause no less than
587
Crime might be diminished the army and navy strengthened
594
the sanctuaries of England
630
Treasons connected with religion in the reigns of Henry VIII Edward
637
Part I
665
Table showing the criminal tendencies of the Irish in the principal
672
Jeffreys one of a numerous
675
INDEX
681

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Seite 73 - ... grievously whipped and burned through the gristle of the right ear with a hot iron of the compass of an inch about, as a manifestation of his wicked life, and due punishment received for the same.
Seite 139 - I take it wholly upon myself — my blood be upon my own head ; and as I must make answer to the God of heaven presently, I declare I am as free of witchcraft as any child. But being delated by a malicious woman, and put in prison under the name of a witch ; disowned by my husband and friends, and seeing no ground of hope of my coming out of prison or ever coming in credit again, through the temptation of the devil I made up that confession on purpose to destroy my own life, being weary of it, and...
Seite 666 - ... only ideas of pleasure, of abundance, and of security. It is this right which has overcome the natural aversion to labour — which has bestowed on man the empire of the earth — which has led nations to give up their wandering habits — which has created a love of country and posterity. To enjoy quickly — to enjoy without punishment — this is the universal desire of man...
Seite 163 - On that day sevennight, his sores upon his back, ear, nose, and face, being not yet cured, he was whipped again at the pillory in Cheapside, and had the remainder of his sentence executed upon him, by cutting off the other ear, slitting the other side of his nose, and branding the other cheek*.
Seite 163 - He was severely whipped before he was put in the pillory. " 2. Being set in the pillory, he had one of his ears cut off.
Seite 211 - Be undaunted and courageous; be sure to execute the law to the utmost of its vengeance upon those that are known — and we have reason to remember them — by the name of Whigs!
Seite 72 - ... shall take the same slave, and give him bread, water, or small drink, and refuse meat, and cause him to work, by beating, chaining, or otherwise, in such work and labour as he shall put him to, be it never so vile.
Seite 577 - Christian country in the nineteenth century, there remains nothing more to be said, except that the 'cat' is, in many cases, too merciful an instrument. If, however, the object of punishment is not vengeance, but the prevention of breaches of the law, it seems useless, so far as example is concerned, to flog a prisoner within the prison walls. The whole power of such a deterrent as flogging (if it is to be regarded as a general deterrent) must be in the vividness with which it can be presented to...
Seite 188 - ... manner run to and fro, and kicked up and down in the common highway and street within the said county and town, called the High Street, a certain ball of ; leather, commonly called a foot-ball, unto the great annoyance and incumbrance of...
Seite 332 - I have been this morning at the Tower, and passed under the new heads at Temple Bar," where people make a trade of letting spyingglasses at a halfpenny a look.

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