Essay on the Character and Influence of Washington in the Revolution of the United States of America

Cover
J. Munroe, 1840 - 188 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 180 - I shall also carry with me the hope that my country will never cease to view them with indulgence, and that after forty-five years of my life dedicated to its service, with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent abilities will be consigned to oblivion, as myself must soon be to the mansions of rest.
Seite 179 - Though in reviewing the incidents of my Administration, I am unconscious of intentional error — I am nevertheless too sensible of my defects not to think it probable that I [may] have committed many errors. — [Whatever they may be I] * fervently beseech the Almighty to avert or mitigate [the evils to which they may tend...
Seite 185 - With me, a predominant motive has been to endeavor to gain time to our country to settle and mature its yet recent institutions, and to progress -without interruption, to that degree of strength and consistency, which is necessary to give it, humanly speaking, the command of its own fortunes.
Seite 176 - ... in such exaggerated and indecent terms as could scarcely be applied to a Nero, a notorious defaulter, or even to a common pickpocket.
Seite 49 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Seite 111 - Their creed is, that the property of the United States has been protected from the confiscation of Britain by the joint exertions of all ; and therefore ought to be the common property of all ; and he that attempts opposition to this creed is an enemy to equity and justice, and ought to be swept from off the face of the earth.
Seite 41 - I can assure those gentlemen, that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold, bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets.
Seite 101 - About ten o'clock I bade adieu to Mount Vernon, to private life, and to domestic felicity ; and, with a mind oppressed with more anxious and painful sensations than I have words to express, set out for New York in company with Mr.
Seite 134 - I shall not, whilst I have the honor to administer the government, bring a man into any office of consequence knowingly, whose political tenets are adverse to the measures, which the general government are pursuing ; for this, in my opinion, would be a sort of political suicide.
Seite 40 - For some days past, there has been little less than a famine in camp. A part of the army has been a week without any kind of flesh, and the rest three or four days.

Bibliografische Informationen