Life and Campaigns of General Robert E. Lee

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National Publishing Company, 1866 - 717 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

I
9
III
27
V
51
VI
175
VII
233
VIII
284
IX
336
XI
368
XIII
414
XV
447
XVII
501
XVIII
580

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 338 - ... and forever free and the executive government of the united states including the military and naval authority thereof will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons and will do no act or acts to repress such persons or any of them in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom...
Seite 281 - All quiet along the Potomac to-night, Where the soldiers lie peacefully dreaming ; Their tents, in the rays of the clear autumn moon. Or the light of the watch-fires are gleaming.
Seite 449 - ... to hammer continuously against the armed force of the enemy and his resources, until by mere attrition, if in no other way, there should be nothing left to him but an equal submission with the loyal section of our common country to the constitution and laws of the land.
Seite 345 - It is with heartfelt satisfaction, that the Commanding General announces to the army, that the operations of the last three days have determined that our enemy must either ingloriously fly, or come out from behind his defences, and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him.
Seite 31 - I had to meet the question whether I should take part against my native State. With all my devotion to the Union, and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home.
Seite 632 - The officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged ; and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands.
Seite 357 - I have just received your note informing me that you were wounded. I cannot express my regret at the occurrence. Could I have directed events, I should have chosen, for the good of the country, to have been disabled in your stead. I congratulate you on the victory which is due to your skill and energy.
Seite 253 - General McLaws, with his own division and that of General RH Anderson, will follow General Longstreet; on reaching Middletown he will take the route to Harper's Ferry, and by Friday morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights and endeavor to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and vicinity.
Seite 179 - I hear constantly of taking strong positions and holding them — of lines of retreat, and of bases of supplies. Let us discard such ideas. The strongest position a soldier should desire to occupy is one from which he can most easily advance against the enemy. Let us study the probable lines of retreat of our opponents, and leave our own to take care of themselves. Let us look before us and not behind. Success and glory are in the advance. Disaster and shame lurk in the rear.
Seite 402 - Six thousand English veterans in stately column tread ; Their cannon blaze in front and flank ; Lord Hay is at their head ; Steady they step adown the slope, steady they climb the hill, Steady they load, steady they fire, moving right onward still...

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