The Letters of Lord Chesterfield to Lord Huntingdon

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Medici Society, 1923 - 132 Seiten
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Seite viii - There were Chesterfield and Fanny* " In that eternal whisper which begun " Ten years ago, and never will be done ;
Seite viii - He never lets the conversation fall, " And I'm sure Fanny can't keep up the ball ; " I saw that her replies were never long, " And with her eyes she answer'd for her tongue ; " Poor I ! am forc'd to keep my distance now, " She won't ev'n curt'sy if I make a bow.
Seite viii - m glad to see your Grace — the Gen'ral too — " Old Charles, how is it? Dicky ! how d'ye do ? " Madam, I hear that you were at the play, " You did not say one word on't yesterday ; " I went, who'd no engagement any where, " To th' Opera."—" Were there many people there ?
Seite 38 - ... after he returns to it will, if I am not more mistaken than ever I was in my life, equal his birth and my hopes. Such a connection 'The close friend, distant kinsman, and frequent correspondent of Chesterfield; sec Introduction, p.
Seite 9 - ... so well ; but yet as things are circumstanced here, it will be impossible for you not to adopt to a certain degree some one. In business one must have connections, and party forms those connections ; the difference is that a fool embraces with zeal the errors of his party, a knave, the guilt, but a man of sense and virtue the general principle only, and therefore he adopts that party whose general principle he knows to be right. The natural rights and liberty of mankind are the true objects of...
Seite 40 - Lord, you will forgive me again if I assume the privilege of an old advising friend. The several countries and Courts of Europe, their characters, their constitutions, their politics and their manners, are very proper objects of your observation and attention, and will require all the time that you can well spare abroad. But the wild arabs in Egypt and the ignorant slaves of Greece are infinitely below your notice, and unworthy of the time they would take up. The broken pyramids and ruined temples...
Seite viii - Old Charles, how is it? Dicky ! how d'ye do ? " Madam, I hear that you were at the play, " You did not say one word on't yesterday ; " I went, who'd no engagement any where, " To th' Opera."—" Were there many people there ?" The Duchess cry'd. —
Seite 9 - ... general principle only, and therefore he adopts that party whose general principle he knows to be right. The natural rights and liberty of mankind are the true objects of Whiggism, for which reason your own good sense and virtue made you adopt that party in spite of all the prejudices of a Westminster1 and Oxford education, but not without seeing the knavery, or the folly of most of the individuals, who either bubbled or bribed, often act directly contrary to the right principles which they profess.
Seite ix - By th' advantageous help of candlelight; Dress'd out with ev'ry aid that is adorning: — Oh, if your lordship saw her in the morning ! It is no more that Fanny once so fair: No roses bloom, no lilies flourish there ; But hollow eyes, and pale and faded cheek, Repentance, love, and disappointment speak.
Seite ix - Register," written about the year 1758, as residing there, and occupied in a life of devotion. " Here Fanny, ever blooming fair, Ejaculates the graceful prayer ; And, 'scaped from sense, with nonsense smit, For Whitfield's cant leaves Stanhope's wit." Lady Fanny had retired from the world, and adopted the religious tenets of the celebrated Whitfield ; and, in spite of the sneer contained in the above lines, there is no reason to doubt of the sincerity or the soundness of her repentance : but " Strawberry...

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