Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

320 Cong.....3d Sess.

Special Session-Duties on Iron.

SENATE.

&

his

of salary, I desired the reading secretary to be Mr. BADGER. These are new ones.

Mr. HUNTER. I think the Senator from placed on an equality with the Chief Clerk, and Mr. Chase. I know it; and I have no doubt Pennsylvania is not exactly aware of my purpose nousin a secondary position. I thought he deserved of their value as stated by the chairman of the and agency in regard to this matter. I introduced it. I believed it was necessary to enable the Sec Committee on Printing; but if they be of such the resolution for the purpose of seeing if someretary to procure the services of a suitable man. value, undoubtedly those who navigate the coast thing cannot be done which may satisfy the conI do not believe a suitable man could be procured can obtain them. I see no reason why the Senate sumers of iron without injuring the producers. for a less compensation; and among the various should purchase them more than any other book It has been suggested to me that here was the idea extravagant expenditures of the Federal Govern- || designed for general circulation.

upon which some such compromise could be made. ment, we ought to expend at least a sufficient sum Buta more serious objection to it is that it would I do not know whether it can be done or not; but to have the proper organization of our desk. This be violating, if not the letter, the spirit of the law. ) it is certain that at the next session we shall have was my view and no other. I am not tenacious The law was designed to prevent the purchase of to meet the question; and I submit to the Senator about it

. I do not wish to interfere with the Sec. | books, not reports to Congress, for which no spe whether it is not better in every point to have all retary in any way. As an evidence of the fact, I cial appropriation was made; and every lawyer the information which we can obiain in regard to provide that he shall make his own selection. If knows that under the general term " books," the subject. That is the end and object of the 1 had been dissatisfied with him in any way, and maps and charts are included. I therefore move resolution. had desired to supersede his rights, I would have that the resolution lie upon the table.

I will say in relation to my own opinions, since submitted a resolution to elect the officer. I have Mr. GWIN. Let it go over until Monday. I || the gentleman has referred to them, that I am considered it due to the Secretary, on account of do not wish to interfere with the Senator from free-trade man. It is known to everybody who the construction which I understood some gentle- || Virginia; but I am prepared to show that it is not knows me that I am a free-trade man to this men have placed upon the resolu ion, to make a violation of the law, and that the charts are of extent--that I go for duties upon revenue princithis explanation. great value.

ples, and for the lowest duties which will bring in Mr. MASON. I move to postpone the further Mr. CHASE. I withdraw my motion. sufficient revenue for the purposes of the Governconsideration of the resolution until Monday. We The motion to postpone was agreed to. ment; but at the same time, I believe that when want an Executive session.

interests are called into existence, whether by im

EXECUTIVE SESSION. The motion was agreed to.

On motion by Mr. MASON, the Senate pro

proper legislation or not, by the action of the Gore RINGGOLD'S COAST OF CALIFORNIA. ceeded to the consideration of Executive business;

ernment, those interests ought not to be suddenly

and wantonly destroyed; and whenever the GovThe following resolution, submitted by Mr. and after some time spent therein, the doors were Gwin on the 17th instant; was taken up for con reopened, and

ernment may choose to take the direction of reform, sideration:

The Senate adjourned.

it should do it as gradually and slowly as may be

consistent with the existence of the interests which " Resolred, That the Secretary of the Senate be authorized

it has called into being. My object is a kind one. to purchase one thousand copies of Ringgold's maps, charts, and sailing directions of the coast of California, for the use

MONDAY, March 28, 1853.

Mr. BRODHEAD. My friend from Virginia of the Senate: Provided, The price shall not exceed four

says he is a free-trade man. It difficult to un dollars per copy."

Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. C. M. BUTLER.

derstand in what sense he is so, because not four Mr. BADGER. I have no other objection to On motion by Mr. SHIELDS, it was

weeks ago, he advocated upon this floor the worst the resolution except that we have not power to Ordered, That C. A. Woolley have leave to withdraw

kind of discrimination. He advocated a proposi. pass it. I do not know whether the Senator from papers

from the files of the Senate.

tion to take the duties off railroad iron entirely. Arkansas (Mr. Borland) recollects it; but by a

Is he in favor of taking them off cotton, woolen,

DUTIES ON IRON. provision contained in the deficiency appropria Mr. HUNTER. I offer the following resolu- Where, then, do we obtain the revenue? I would

and other species of manufactures in the country? tion bill of last session, it is expressly provided

tion: that no books shall be distributed to members of

like to know what my friend from Virginia means

Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be directed Congress, except such as are published by Conto report to the Senate at its next annual session, the aver

by saying that he is a free-trade man? Does he gress as public documents, unless an appropria age prices annually of bar-iron, merchantable, manufactured mean that he is in favor of the repeal of all duties, iion had been by law previously made for the by rolling; bar-iron, merchantable, manufactured otherwise and a resort to direct taxation? It would seem so

than by rolling; railroad iron, manufactured by rolling, and purpose.

from the fact of his advocating the abolition of Mr. MASON. The resolution will evidently

pig-iron, for the last ten years preceding 1853, in the foreign
markets of production or shipment; also the average prices

duties upon railroad iron entirely; because I can lead to debate. I move to postpone its further annually of the same description of iron at New York and see no reason whatever for taking the duty off railconsideration until Monday.

Pittsburg for the same period, together with the charges for road iron and not off the other articles which I Mr. BORLAND. My attention has not been freights, insurance, and commission.

have named. particularly called to that provision of the law. I had considered the subject only in reference to the

that the true basis of a compromise between the vania says he is at a loss to know in what sense value of the chart, of which I have very strong producers and consumers of iron in this country | I pronounce myself a free-trade man. I said in evidence before me. I have the testimony borne would be to establish a point in the price after

what sense it was. I said I was in favor of laying by the Coast Survey and from other sources as to

which no duty should be charged. It has been on duties only on revenue principles, to raise as the accuracy and value of the charts, which shows said that it is probable some point could be ascer much revenue as would be necessary for the proper that they are now regarded by navigators as indistained after which the duty could be taken off with

administration of the Government. That defined pensable to ships which are navigating the ocean

out injuring the producers of iron, and which would upon the Pacific coast.

my opinion in that respect. He says, though, Whether they will come

be for the benefit of the consumers—the protection that I must be for.direct iaxation, because I voted under the head of books or not, I do not know. being that the duty would be applied upon the iron We have procured a limited number of them, and whenever it ranged below the price named by follow. Here is a question, if I chose to go into

to ti ke the duty off railroad iron. That does not they are in very great demand. The gentlemen

law. For the purpose of ascertaining if such a lit, in relation to the propriety of taking the duty from California attach very great value to them, thing be possible, inasmuch as it is very desirable off railroad iron, which involves the question in and deem them of great importance. Navigators of established character deem them of very great producing and consuming interests, I have intro- regard to the true principles of taxation; but I do

not choose to enter into it. The Senator might importance, indispensable indeed. T'he Coast Sur

duced the resolution. The question will come up vey, under whose examination they are passed, at the next session. By that time the Secretary he alluded, I voted under the instructions of my

have remembered, that on the occasion to which and who have made use of them in perfecting will be enabled to give us the information upon State Legislature, and that during the whole time their reports, bear the very highest testimony as

which we may act in regard to the subject. | previously I had declined meddling with the subto their character and their indispensable necessity

seems to me exceedingly desirable that we should | ject of duties upon iron, in any way. He knows to all persons navigating the Pacific coast. produce harmony between the great industrial in

that I made no speech in regard to it. I gave a Mr. BADGER. I will read the provision of ierests of the country, and whenever the subject is

vote in accordance with instructions. And now law: capable of compromise we should begin in time

what is the object I have in view? It is to obtain and collect information to enable the Government information, to see whether we may not ascertain Be it further enacted, That hereafter no books shall be distributed to members of Congress, except such as are or to make some arrangement which may enable

some point in the price after which the duty may dered to be printed as public documents by the Congress of them all to go on harmoniously. I trust that which they are members: Provided, That this section shall

be taken off iron, not only for railroad, but for all not prohibit or interfere with the distribution, to all mem

something like this may be done. It seems to me bers who have heretofore received books under the order of to be a plausible idea; and without committing reserving a provision in the law by which duties

purposes, without injury to the producing interest, either House, of the remaining volumes or parts, so as to myself to it, I think there is so much in it as to

shall be laid upon iron when its price ranges below complete the sets which they have received." make it desirable to have the information to enable

the point. I have it from good authority that Mr. GWIN. That does not refer to these us to act upon it hereafter.

there are many iron-masters who believe that this charts, and most valuable ones they are. They Mr. BRODHEAD. Since 1846 or 1847, the

would afford the basis of a compromise. I know are not books. They are nothing but charts. manufacturers of railroad and other iron generally

there are many railroad men who believe it. I do Mr. PETTIT. With the leave of the Senator have been asking for some compromise. They from California, I will obviate all that difficulty. I have appealed more than once, I believe, to the I have the information; but, as I said before, I

not yet pronounce upon it. I cannot do so until The resolution is to authorize their purchase for honorable Senator from Virginia, and I am very think the idea is plausible enough to justify us in the use of the Senate. I propose to amend it so happy to learn now that he is willing to have the effort to obtain testimony to see how far it is that it shall be for the use of the navigators upon some compromise on the subject. I should have

practicable. the Pacific coast. That certainly will obviate the been much more pleased to have heard it from him

The question was then taken on the resolution, difficulty. (Laughter.) some two or three years ago when those engaged

and it was agreed to. Mr. ĠWIN. I accept that.

in the manufacture of iron, especially of railroad Mr. CHASE. I think we have already voted | iron, were suffering so terribly, and calling loudly

NAVAL DEPÔT AT NEWPORT. about enough for charts, for relief.

Mr.JAMES submitted the following resolution;

320 CONG.....30 Sess.

Special Session-Ringgold's Charts.

SENATE.

case.

and Weller-12.

which was considered by unanimous consent, and Mr. SHIELDS. If the Senator will permit on the score of sympathy or anything else, is not agreed to:

me,

I do not want to go into this matter, but I due to him. Resolved. That the Secretary of the Navy be requested

will state that if there had been a term fixed for the Mr. BAYARD. I am opposed generally to to inquire whether it will not be advantageous to the Gov office, and Mr. Beale had been an officer who everything like contingent allowances, and shall ernment of the United States, to establish a naval depót at knew he was to be removed at the expiration of | always be. I think I stated the other day that they Newport, Rhode Island, and that he report to the Senate

that term,

the case would be very different. The necessarily lead to corruption. The case, however, at its next session.

Sergeant-at-Arms is compelled to procure stabling now before us seems to me to form an exception. LATE SERGEANT-AT-ARMS.

and forage and make various preparations in or The practice of the Senate has hitherto been for

der to manage the affairs of the Senate; and, sir, || its officers to hold during pleasure, without any On motion by Mr. SHIELDS, the Senate, as in the salary proposed to be given by the resolution specific term, without any known time at which Committee of the Whole, proceeded to consider will not compensate Mr. Beale for the injury the office would expire and they would be liable the following resolution, which was ordered on which he has sustained. What is it? It is at best to reëlection. Suddenly, during an Executive sesThursday last to lie upon the table:

only $1,800 a year, and the resolution proposes sion, you removed the late Sergeant-at-Arms, withResolved, that the Secretary of the Senate pay to Rob

to pay only to the end of the fiscal year; and here out notice, without investigation. I do not know ert Beale, late Sergeant-at-Arms, the salary for the residue he is left to dispose of forage, of stabling, of a va that there was any ground of objection, but simply of the present year.”

riety of things which he had prepared in order to on the ground of mere will, by which you choose Mr. SHIELDS. I hope there will be no oppo

the performance of his duties in this body. The to place a new person in the situation. The act sition to the resolution, and if so, I do not want horses and carry-alls are all left on his hands. In was right and proper in itself, it in the judgment to say a word in relation to it. The only object my humble opinion there is a strong equity in this of Senators they could procure a better officer by I had in view in introducing it was this: the late

I do not say the Senate is bound to make so doing; but when no charges were made, I think Sergeant-at-Arms, who has served since I came

the allowance, but I say it is equitable when an by the general practice and usage of the Senate, it into the Senate--and I think with great fidelity-officer is cut off in the midst of the term to make would be an act of ordinary liberality to make the and has done everything which a man could do to an allowance.

allowance which the resolution proposes. It is make himself useful to Senators, has been removed

Mr. WALKER. I believe I understand the widely different from the case of an officer who without any notice. It is well known that there

Senator's idea. I am sorry that this last matter holds office for a specific term, when he knows his has been no term fixed for these changes; that he

has been brought up. I feel as little disposition to office will terminate unless he is reëlected or reaphad no previous notice; that the action of the Sen say anything which may be afflictive to Mr. || pointed. Such kas not hitherto been the practice ate electing another person in his place, came un

Beale's feelings as any Senator on this floor, but I of the Senate. It is for these reasons that I am expectedly upon him. He has been left with a must mention a fact in connection with this mat disposed to vote for the allowance, because unless considerable amount of property on his hands, of

ter, for it seems to be the strongest ground upon we make it, it will seem like an implied reflection which of course he will be unable to dispose in

which the resolution is based. I procured from upon the character of the officer. such a way as to make it advantageous to himself. the Secretary of the Senate—I made it a part of The resolution was then reported to the Senate If there had been a term, as for instance four

his duty to furnish me—a paper showing that du without amendment, and was read a thir time. years, during which he knew he was to hold office, ring, one long session of Congress there was paid | On the question of its passage the yeas and nays and then a new election was to come on, it would

to Mr. Beale for the service of his horses and his were ordered, and being taken, resulted-yeas 27, be very different; but I think this case stands upon carry-alls, upwards of $5,000. Sir, the Committee

nays 12, as follows: a different footing altogether. There has been on the Contingent Expenses of the Senate have

YEAS-Messrs. Atchison, Badger, Bayard, Brodhead, no definite term for the appointment of these offi

been making their exertions to reduce this matter Butler, Clayton, Cooper, Dodge of Wisconsin, Everett, cers. In fact they have looked upon themselves in the hands of Mr. Beale; and I must now say

Fish, Fitzpatrick, Gwin, James, Morton, Norris, Phelps, as here for life. It is true that the Senate has only to the Senator that in defiance of that committee, I Pratt, Rusk, Sebastian, Seward, Shields, Smith, Soule,

Stuart, Thompson of Kentucky, Thomson of New Jersey, performed its duty perhaps in reëlecting its officers; while I was a member of it, Mr. Beale would

and Wrighi_27 but at the same time, this falls a little hard upon employ his extra horses, and carry-alls, and NAYS-Messrs. Adams, Atherton, Borland, Chase, this officer, who has done everything a man could

wagons, and when the committee refused to allow Evans, Houston, Mason, Peilit, Sumner, Toucey, Walker, do, to discharge his duty to the Senate. I hope it, he dogged us from one end of the Capitol to the resolution will pass without opposition.

So the resolution was passed. the other, and all around and over it; and in the Mr. PETTIT. I am opposed to the resolution

last six days he has been dogging me, although Mr. BRODHEAD subsequently moved a refor the reasons which I stated the other day, and

not now a member of the committee, to use my consideration of the vote, and said: I thought that I will not trouble the Senate by repeating them.

influence with them to get the allowance of the the resolution made the allowance for the residue It seems to me it is without precedentand propriety. last batch for the horses. That is the last thing of the fiscal year which ends in June; but upon a We have dismissed an officer who held' his office for which he should be compensated. I hope that | critical examination of it, I think it may be condependent upon the will of the Senate. The Sen- | nothing more of that kind will be mentioned as a strued to extend the pay until December next. It ate has expressed its will. It does not want him

merit. I think now, to speak plainly, that the says “ the present year.” I understood, in the any longer; and why he should still be in our pay

least said about the matter the beiter, for I should hurry and confusion which prevailed in the ChamI am totally unable to see. I will ask for the be extremely sorry, in justification of my own ber--for there is a good deal of “noise and confuyeas and nays upon the passage of the resolution. course, and of the Committee on Contingent Ex- || sion” here—that it was during the fiscal year.

Mr. WALKER. I am opposed to the resolu penses, to bring forth other matters that might be, Mr. SHIELDS. My intention was that it tion. I think it ought not to be adopted. If we

and shall be brought forth, if necessary, from my should be so understood. I have no objection to do this, we shall constitute a precedent for almost desk.

inserting " fiscal.”: The alteration can be made everything that can be considered a gratuity. Now,

Mr. SHIELDS. As far as I am concerned, by common consent. can any Senator in the Chamber mention to me

the honorable Senator can bring forth what he The motion to reconsider was agreed to, and upon what principle the salary of the Sergeant-at- || pleases. I know nothing about what the Com the question recurred on the passage of the resoArms should be paid to Mr. Beale for the rest of

mittee on Contingent Expenses have done, and I lution. the year, unless it be upon the ground stated by

have made no charges against that committee, far Mr. BRODHEAD. I move to insert “ fiscal” the Senator from Illinois? I think that no man from it. I presume Mr. Beale received no money before " year.' can mention any good ground upon which the al

out of the contingent fund that was not allowed Mr. SHIELDS. At the same time, to save any lowance should be made. Is the ground stated by him by the Senate. Whether it was allowed by further difficulty, I move to insert“ out of the the Senator from Illinois a good one? Why, sir, the committee or not, I know not. The Senate contingent fund of the Senate,” after “ pay.' have we displaced an officer who is left destitute must have supposed that they gave that money The amendments were agreed to, and the resoand pennyless, and without support? Not at all.

for some object. I cannot understand the honor- || lution as amended was passed. We have exercised the privilege that belonged to able Senator when he says that this money has

READING SECRETARY. the Senate of electing a Sergeant-at-Arms to su

been allowed to Mr. Beale against the wishes of persede Mr. Beale; but it is not the fact, if I unthe Senate for extra services. Is that what I am

Mr. ADAMS moved to take up the resolution derstand it aright, that Mr. Beale is left in a destito understand ? I know nothing of that. All I

submitted by him some days since in relation to

ihe appointment of a reading secretary; but the tute condition. He is not left as one of those say is—and I understand the honorable Senator

motion was lost; there being on a division-ayes helpless and poor office-holders who is suddenly does not pretend to gainsay it—that Mr. Beale is taken by surprise and turned out. We shall have left with a large amount of property on his hands 10, noes not counted. in every Department of the Government, in all which he had to procure for the service of the

RINGGOLD'S CHARTS. probability, cases which will excite our commis. Senate.

The Senate resumed the consideration of the eration much more than this; and shall the le

Mr. WALKER. If the honorable Senator following resolution: gislative branch of the Government take up the will allow me, I will state that he was authorized,

Resolved, that the Secretary of the Senate be authorized case of every clerk who is turned out by surprise, if I understood the last order of the Senate aright,

to purchase one thousand copies of Ringgold's maps, charts, and left without anything to fall back upon, and to employ one wagon for the mail service, and and sailing directions, of the coast of California, for the use make him an allowance for one year following his one for document purposes. Now, if that is the of navigators upon that coast: Provided, The price shall not

exceed four dollars per copy." removal? I hope not. Your Treasury would be great amount to be left upon his hands, and he is insufficient for it; and yet we propose to set an to be paid a year's salary in consequence of it, be

Mr. MASON. I think very clearly that the example which would be one of the most memo

it so." I do not think they would be a great bur- | resolution is against the meaning, if it is not withrable of the kind in regard to one of our own offi

den to him. I understand that horses and wagons in the letter, of the act of the last session, to which We pay Mr. Beale! Why the position bring pretty good prices here. I mentioned the you, Mr. President, (Mr. Badger in the chair,) which he occupies is not even a sinecure, and we fact of the large receipts that he had to show that called the attention of the Senate on Saturday, pay the gentleman whom we have elected for the the ground of sympathy for him is not well taken, prohibiting the purchase of books, unless by a joint actual discharge of the duties. I can see no good and that we ought not io be called upon on such a vote of the two Houses. I think that is a suffi. reason for it.

ground to make him an allowance which in reality, cient objection to it; but were it not so, I think it New SERIES.-No. 20.

cers.

320 Cong....30 Sess.

Special Session-Hour of Meeting.

SENATE.

ate.

Senate.

case.

incumbent upon me to vote against the resolution, cial session, violate a law which they assisted in

framed “ for the use of the members of the Sen. and to state my reason for doing so. The gen- i passing at the close of the last session.

Where is your warrant for publishing tleman who compiled the charts is one that I have It is said that this does not fall within the letter books, by order of the Senate, for distribution by the fortune to know personally and well, and I of the law because it is a chart. Sir, there are any other persons than Senators? It seems to me apprehend a more meritorious and distinguished numerous decisions, as all lawyers know, which that the resolution is more objectionable in the officer does not belong to the service. He has establish the doctrine that the word “book" does form in which it passed than it was originally. It rendered very great service in compiling these in point of fact comprehend charts. That is the contains no provision as to who is to distribute charts. It afforded me pleasure at a former day legal sense of the term. It is a sense which of the charts. We are told that the Navy Departto go with the majority of the Senate for their course would apply to the word “ books" in the ment will do it. How is the Navy Department publication; and I think they were published by law to which reference is made. If, then, we pass to get them? Under the resolution who is to del an order of the Senate, as an act of deserved dis- the resolution it will certainly, according to the egate the power to it to distribute them? When tinction to the officer who compiled them; and at import of language, violate that law.

you prini books for the use of the Senate, you the same time the Senate provided that a certain Mr. BAYARD. The objection mentioned by have a general rule for their distribution; but you number of copies should be purchased. I think the Senator from Ohio is the only reason why I have none to apply to this at all. The charts it would be not only wrong, but in bad taste for must'vote against this resolution. Were it a joint | may be bought, but they will lie here and require the Senate to go further in making the purchase. resolution, I am inclined to think I would vote the subsequent action of the Senate, or both I have no doubt, from the evidence of which we cheerfully for it. But the law to which reference Houses, in order to distribute them. have heard, as well as from the ability of the com is made, clearly, in its letter and intent, restrains The PRESIDENT. The resolution cannot be piler of the charts, that they are very useful to the action of the Senate in this matter, and I can

altered unless by unanimous consent, or by moving navigators on the Pacific coast; but I have yet to not violate that law.

a reconsideration. learn, and if I should learn it would be with great Mr. BORLAND. I shall not contend with the

HOUR OF MEETING. concern, that it is the province of the Senate to Senators who have just spoken, upon the meaning enter on the course of purchasing charts for the which they attach to the word "chart” and the Mr. WALKER. I submit the following resouse of navigators. If they are required, as doubt. similarity of meaning which they seem to think lution: less they are, there is an abundance of money exists between that and the word “ book;" but Resolved, That hereafter the hour of meeting of the Senability in those who use them to purchase them. there is another ground which I think very satis ate shall be ten o'clock, a. m., until otherwise ordered by the I shall therefore vote against the resolution. factory, upon which this proposition is not ex

Mr. GWIN. In regard to the first objection cluded by ihe terms of the law. The third section I will state to the Senate the reason why I shall which is made to the resolution, I will merely say of the act referred to, in which the prohibition is ask for the consideration of that resolution at this that the charts are not a book; and we published made, is in these words:

time. As we meet now, we do not sit while the at this session, by order of the Committee on Print " That hereafter no books shall be distributed to mem

Cabinet are in Cabinet council. They are in couning, fifteen hundred extra copies of a chart, show bers of Congress except such as are ordered to be printed cil during the morning, and come out about the ing the route from California to Shanghai for mail by the Congress of which they are members.

same time we commence our session. We there steamers, which was very similar in its character, We well know the reason for that. We well fore cannot see them while we are idling away the though not so accurate as this. But in regard to know that there was a great complaint that mem morning. When our hour of meeting arrives

, this work, I have reason to know this officer of bers of Congress were in the habit of voting them- | they have left Cabinet council and gone to the De the Navy, of whom I can speak in as much praise selves large quantities of books to be paid for out partments. Then we commence our silling, and as the Senator from Virginia. He lost largely by of the contingent fund of the respective Houses. the result is that a great many Senators who have the publication of the charts, and I wish, on my It was considered an abuse; and the cry had gone business at the Departments have to go away, and part, to remunerate him, and through the hands

through the country and got into the newspapers we are left often without a quorum. Now, I hare of the Secretary of the Navy to put the charts in that we were voting ourselves libraries. The sec no doubt thiat there are a great many Senators possession of those who navigate those waters. tion which I have read was intended to meet that who have business to attend to at the Departments

am perfectly confident that we cannot make an But, sir, here is a very different thing. It which they must transact, and they have gone expenditure of an equal amount by which more is proposed to purchase a valuable chart, call it a away to attend to it, and I should not be surprised good can be brought to the Government than by book if you please, which the interests of naviga- in a short time to-day, and on every subsequent purchasing these maps; but I will not detain the

tion very much require, because our commerce day, after this hour, to find ourselves left withou: Senate.

upon the Pacific ocean is very rapidly extending a quorum. If we can meet at ten o'clock, and sit Mr. BORLAND. I wish to say to the Senator and increasing; and it is also intended, as I said, || until one, we shall be sitting during the time whee from Virginia, that I think he is mistaken in sup while subserving that great public purpose, to re the Cabinet are in council, and the Cabinet couvel posing that Congress published these charts. They imburse a meritorious public officer, who, at his and the session of the Senate will break

up about were published, I believe, by Captain Ringgold

own expense, published the work and has not yet the same time, and then we can have an opporthimself, and Congress purchased some of them. received any return for it, notwithstanding its nity to transact our business at the Departments

. Mr. MASON. Yes, sir. Mr. BORLAND. They were published at his

great public value. He is yet out of pocket sev- | It is for this reason that I offer the resolution, and

eral thousand dollars. By passing the resolution, ask for its consideration now. own expense. At first I was opposed to the res therefore, we shall not disregard the law, but we The PRESIDING OFFICER. Does any Senolution, but when I have evidence furnished me shall subserve the public interest and at the same ator object to considerimg the resolution at this from the Coast Survey office, and from other dis time do an act of justice to a meritorious officer. time? tinguished and competent sources, of their great value, indeed of their almost indispensable neces

The yeas and nays being taken on the resolu Mr. SEWARD and Mr. BUTLER. I object.

tion, resulted-yeas 22, nays 16; as follows: Mr. WALKER. Withdraw the objectior. sity to all our ships navigating the Pacific coast,

YEAS-Messrs. Atherton, Borland, Brodhead, Dodge of

Mr. BUTLER. I cannot withdraw the objec. and when I ascertained further, that the compiler Wisconsin, Douglas, Everett, Fitzpatrick, Gwin, Hamlin, aion. I think our hour of meeting is well arranged has not been reimbursed by several thousand dol Houston, James, Jones of Iowa, Morton, Norris, Pettit, its it is. The Senate ought to deliberate sepaa lars for the cost which he has personally incurred, Prall, Sebastian, Seward, Shields, Stuart, Thomson of

rately and let the Cabinet officers do their ora I am in favor of the resolution. He has conferred

New Jersey, and Weller--22.

NAYS--Messss. Aichison, Badger, Bayard, Butler, business. This thing of Senators going to transas upon navigation in all that coast of the country, Chase, Clayton, Evans, Fish, Mason, Phelps, Smith, Soulé, | business with the Departments and making a one of the greatest benefits which ever has been Sumner, Thompson of Kentucky, Toucey, and Wright-16. excuse for altering our hour of meeting is di conferred. We have the testimony of the Coast So the resolution was agreed to.

wrong. Whatever business they have with the Survey, that in the preparation of the maps which Mr. PRATT. I would suggest to the Senator Departments ought to be done in writing: they have since made, they derived great benefit from California, the propriety of making some al Nr. WALKER. . I do not mean that this is ta from these charts, and found them indispensable teration in the terms of the resolution, because it give Senators an opportunity to go to the Cabelo to the work, and saved a large expense and labor occurs to me, that under it, there is no power con councils-of course they cannot get there. Bu by having them. If we purchase these charts, it ferred to distribute the charts. The law of last there are many Senators who desire to see the will be for the benefit of navigation. The com- session prohibits their being distributed to Senators heads of Departments on business; and the Cebised piler has incurred great expense, and has not yet when they are purchased. Where are they to go? | council breaks up just about the time that we se been reimbursed; and it does seem to me nothing Mr. BÚTLER. To navigators.

into session now, and consequently we have no more than simple justice-to say nothing of the Mr. PRATT. How are they to get to naviga- | opportunity to attend to our departmental bas benefit conferred upon the interests of navigation- tors? I suggest that the resolution needs some If we go to the Departments in the mornto pay him as much for the use of the work as it modification in that respect.

ing we cannot find the heads of the Department, cost him; and the additional copies which we pro Mr. BORLAND. I suppose, in authorizing the for they are in Cabinet council, and as samt 33 pose to purchase will not do more than repay the Secretary to purchase the charts for the use of they come out of council our session comments, money which he has paid out, and which has navigators, there is a general power given to him so that we have no time to see them; but if gone to the benefit of the country.

to put them into the hands of navigators. That should meet at ten and adjourn at one we can Mr. BAYARD called for the yeas and nays on follows as a necessary consequence; and we are to attend to departmental business and senatore

. the resolution, and they were ordered.

suppose that he will iake a common-sense view of business also. The Senator asks me what he Mr. CHASE. I desire simply to say that the the subject, and adopt some reasonable practicable ness I have at the Departments? remarks submitted by the Senator from California plan by which they will go into the hands of those Mr. BUTLER. I do not. would convince me, if I needed any conviction for whom they are intended.

Mr. WALKER. I do not know whether the upon this subject, that this is a very meritorious Mr. BAYARD. Where is the authority on Senator has any or not, but I can tell him the: 1 work; and I would cheerfully vote for the resolu the part of any officer of this body to turn these he hailed from Wisconsin or any of the wester tion, if I were not fully satisfied that it is against books over to any one else? Where does it spring or northern States, he would find the duis

operous one, which could not be thrown of ! law; and I trust the Senate will not, at this spe- II olution, I supposed it stood as it was originally I is imposed upon us, and some time must be taken

ness.

320 Cong....30 Sess.

Special SessionReading Clerk.

[Senate.

can

cers.

now.

to attend to it; and I will say that if the Senate in the world why we should go into an organiza- | the duties intended to be assigned to the individual continues meeting at the time at which we now tion of the officers of the Senate at the close of this embraced in the resolution, and I therefore demeet, and are in session the only time when we special session. I have heard a great deal on this sire to give the Secretary time to make the selec

see the members of the Cabinet, I shall be subject. I have read some things about it, and I tion. It is a matter of very little patronage. compelled to leave the Senate at some hour of the am strongly disposed to think that the officers of Three hundred dollars a year, for the convenience day to attend to my business at the Departments. the Senate, the police officers, the ministerial of the Senate!

Mr. PETTIT. I simply desire to say to the agents, and probably those in the office of the Mr. BORLAND. Eighteen hundred dollars. Senator from Wisconsin, that I object to one of Secretary of the Senate may want some organiza. Mr. ADAMS. That is the salary which the his remarks, and that is the one which indicates tion. I am disposed to think it would be found resolution proposes to allow; but the Secretary is that we are idle in the forenoon. I do not know expedient at the commencement of the next ses now authorized to give $1,500, if he should choose any Senator who is idle. (Laughter.)

sion to refer the subject to a committee to ascertain to appoint a person. Talk about patronage! EcoMr. SEWARD. I desire to ask the Senator what the existing organization is, and inquire into nomical as I usually am, no objection on the score from Wisconsin, whether the Cabinet have ex the necessity which may exist for reorganization. of economy entered into my mind to such a proppressed any particular desire to see more of the If no other Senator should move in it, I may feel osition. But as I said before, I have no feeling in Senate than they can sea now? If they have not, it incumbent upon me to ask for a committee at the matter. If it is the pleasure of the Senate to I shall object to the resolution.

the next session to take into consideration the re- | postpone it indefinitely, I have a convenient seat Mr. WALKER. We are not consulting their organization of the whole department of our offi near the desk, where I can hear any reading that comfort. We do not propose to ask them when

For the

present, however, to test the sense may be thought necessary. I have deemed it a we shall go; and I do not propose to ask the Sen of the Senate, move that the resolution lie upon matter of importance, for the convenience of the ator from New York, nor will my constituents, | the table.

Secretary, that the Secretary should have the opwho have imposed the duty upon me be likely to The motion was not agreed to, there being on a portunity of selecting the individual. Having conask him, as to when and how I shall attend to the division-ayes 14, noes 18.

fidence, as I have, in his discretion, I embraced in duty. I presume those of us who have business Mr. BUTLER. I am sure such an officer as the resolution the privilege of suffering him to to attend to, will do it whether the Cabinet are the resolution proposes to appoint is not necessary make the appointment. All I ask now is a vote. willing to see us or not.

The desk does not require it; the business Mr. WALKER. It is said that the Secretary The PRESIDING OFFICER. As the con of the Senate does not require it; and who is it has the power to appoint a $1,500 clerk, and that sideration of the resolution is objected to, it goes || that requires an additional officer at this time at the resolution, in its operation, only increases the over one day under the rule.

the close of this session? Is the resolution pro pay $300. Now, sir, we are at the close of an EXECUTIVE SESSION.

posed with the view that the Secretary shall select Executive session; very nearly nine months are to

from his own clerks one to fill the office, or select pass away before we shall enter upon the duties On motion by Mr. MASON, the Senate pro one that he may think entirely suitable? or is it of another session; and suppose the Secretary ceeded to the consideration of Executive business, that there is somebody who wants the office, who should now exercise the power to appoint a readand after some time spent therein, the doors were is in the view of the gentleman who moves the | ing clerk at $1,500 per annum, three fourths of reopened, resolution?

whose salary would run on when he had not a And the Senate adjourned.

Mr. ADAMS. If the Senator will allow me, I word of reading to do, what would you say? For will inform him that the resolution authorizes the one, I am in favor of visiting, by investigation and

Secretary to select whoever he may think proper. | punishment, those who are guilty of wrong-doing; Tuesday, March 29, 1853.

Mr. BUTLER. I understand a little behind these and I say emphatically that I should be after him, Prayer by the Rev. J. G. Butler.

things. [Laughter.) I suppose the Secretary has | for one, if he should exercise that power. I beOn motion by Mr. JONES, of Iowa, it was

a pretty strong hint of who the incumbent is to be. lieve the Senate would revolt at the idea that he

Mr. President, if our patronage were to be dis- || should employ a reading clerk whose salary should Ordered, 'That Avery Downer have leave to withdraw his

pensed in this way, I would have it that the gentle run nine months in the vacation of the Senate to papers from the files of the Senate.

man who is to be selected for it, if an additional one start with. We propose, then, to do what we FOLDING OF DOCUMENTS.

be selected, should be some aspiring literary young would censure the Secretary for doing. We are Mr. BADGER submitted the following resolu

man who, with $1,500 or $1,800 a year, would be asked to resort to the unjustifiable patronage of tion; which was considered by unanimous consent,

enabled to improve his mind in the Library. I employing a reading clerk for the Secretary, to sit and agreed to:

would have a man of literature, not one who is | down for nine months without the necessity of Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-Arms be authorized to

identified merely with party. If I had the assur opening his mouth to read one word. That is the continue the messengers in the employment of the Senate,

ance that the office would be disposed upon a man proposition. And besides, what do we want with for two months after the termination of the present session, who would avail himself of the opportunity to more clerks at the Secretary's desk? I asked you, for the purpose of folding and transmitting documents. improve his mind upon the subject of literature- || sir, if it was in order to offer an amendmeni. i READING CLERK.

some young clergyman, or young man looking to have one here, which, if the original resolution be Mr. ADAMS. I move to take up the resolu- | reluctant upon the subject; but at the close of the it the words,

a distinction of that kind-perhaps I might be less | adopted, should also be adopted. It is to add to tion which I submitted a few days ago, in relation

session I do not like to see the Senate subjected to " And that the desk of the Secretary be lengthened about to a reading secretary. I will state to Senators that if it is taken up I will make such a modifica

terms to have an appointment made when there is five feet, five-and-a-half, or six feet."

no occasion for it; and I shall therefore vote tion of it as I suppose will make it acceptable to

Sir, it would be necessary to have more room every one. against the resolution.

there, if you get another reading clerk; for unless The motion was agreed to, and the Senate pro- Il officer is not needed at this session. We cannot

Mr. CHASE. I am quite satisfied that the you extend the desk there will be no place for him ceeded to consider the resolution.

io sit. We are to appoint a clerk to read nine Mr. ADAMS. I desire to modify the resolu

tell what we may need at the next session; and in months for us when we are scattered all over the tion, so that it will read as follows:

order that we may act with all the lights before us, Union! An act for which, if performed by the

I move that the subject be postponed until the first Secretary, we should censure him; yet it is proResolved, that the Secretary of the Senate be authorized Monday in December nexi. to employ a clerk, who shall, under his direction, read at the

posed to pass the resolution and do it ourselves.

Mr. BAYARD called for the yeas and nays on desk of the Secretary and discharge such other duties as the

Mr. BUTLER. I understand from the Senator Secretary may assign him; and who shall receive the same the motion, and they were ordered.

from Mississippi, that this clerk is to be a man of compensation as the principal clerk."

Mr. WALKER. Would it be in order to pro very rare endowments. I believe he said that not I will state, in a very few words, the substance | pose an amendment to the resolution now? one in ten thousand could be got exactly suitable. of an explanation which I made a few days ago. The PRESIDING OFFICER, (Mr. Badger in I suppose, then, the object of the resolution is to I understand that the duties legitimately belonging the chair.) It will not be in order pending the authorize the Secretary of the Senate to employ a to the Chief Clerk, are to keep a minute of the pro- || motion to postpone.

person who, during the nine months between now ceedings of the Senate and to make up the record; Mr. BORLAND. I shall vote for the post- and the commencement of the next session, may that the duties performed at the desk' by Colonel ponement, for the reasons which have been so come here and rehearse, I should like to hear Hickey are extra duties; and this proposition is to well stated by the Senators from Virginia and the rehearsals, and the gentleman's practice in relieve him. His business, which is enough for South Carolina, that at this session, at any rate, || elocution. It would be an exhibition worth witany one man to perform, is elsewhere, and not at we do not need the addition to our clerical force, nessing. Who would not come here every mornthe desk. The resolution is only to authorize a and that at the beginning of the next long session, | ing to hear that fellow sing out until he had almost proper organization of that desk.' I think we are if we do need it, we can take the subject up and got the records by heart (Laughter.) entitled to it. It increases the compensation als dispose of it deliberately. We shall then have Mr. ADAMS.' If the Senator will allow me, I lowed, from $1,500 to $1,800—which I appre- | plenty of time before business accumulates on our will say that my remarks justified no such criticism hend is not unreasonable. I think really that there hands, and we shall avoid the incurring of what as he has thought proper to put upon them with can be no serious objection to the resolution. It I consider a very unnecessary expense, and also | his great facility of turning everything into ridiis intended not to affect any one's rights, but to the doing with a very thin Senate—a bare quorum cule. I only suggested that there were but few enable the Secretary to perform, in a proper man I apprehend—what would seem more properly to reading clerks who would answer the purpose, ner, the duties which devolve upon him. 'It meets belong to a full Senate at the beginning of a new and I desired to give the Secretary time to look his approbation, and that of all concerned, so far | Congress.

around him to make the selection. How the as I know.

Mr. ADAMS. This is a matter in which I Senator can, from my remarks, come to the exMr. MASON. I very respectfully submit to have no feeling; but I deemed it necessary to in- | traordinary conclusion to which he arrives, I canthe Senator from Mississippi, whether it would troduce the resolution, for the advantage and con not see, though for that gentleman to come to an not be proper to let the matter lie for the present. venience of the Senate. My opinion is that not extraordinary conclusion is not strange. We do not now want a reading clerk. We may one man out of ten thousand reading clerks, can Mr. BUTLER. I had not given up the floor want one at the next session. There is no reason be procured to discharge, in a suitable manner, when the Senator from Mississippi anticipated me.

32D Cong....30 Sess.

Special Session-Hour of Meeting.

SENATE.

ate.

Senate.

incumbent upon me to vote against the resolution, cial session, violate a law which they assisted in framed “ for the use of the members of the Senand to state my reason for doing so. The gen- passing at the close of the last session.

Where is your warrant for publishing tleman who compiled the charts is one that I have It is said that this does not fall within the letter | books, by order of the Senate, for distribution by the fortune to know personally and well, and I of the law because it is a chart. Sir, there are any other persons than Senators? It seems to me apprehend a more meritorious and distinguished numerous decisions, as all lawyers know, which that the resolution is more objectionable in the officer does not belong to the service. He has establish the doctrine that the word “book" does form in which it passed than it was originally. It rendered very great service in compiling these in point of fact comprehend charts. That is the contains no provision as to who is to distribute charts. It afforded me pleasure at a former day legal sense of the term. It is a sense which of the charts. We are told that the Navy Departto go with the majority of the Senate for their course would apply to the word "books" in the ment will do it. How is the Navy Department publication; and I think they were published by law to which reference is made. If, then, we pass to get them? Under the resolution who is to delan order of the Senate, as an act of deserved dis the resolution it will certainly, according to the egate the power to it to distribute them? When tinction to the officer who compiled them; and at import of language, violate that law.

you prini books for the use of the Senate, you the same time the Senate provided that a certain Mr. BAYARD.' The objection mentioned by have a general rule for their distribution; but you number of copies should be purchased. I think the Senator from Ohio is the only reason why have none to apply to this at all. The charts it would be not only wrong, but in bad taste for must'vote against this resolution. Were it a joint may be bought, but they will lie here and require the Senate to go further in making the purchase. resolution, I am inclined to think I would vote the subsequent action of the Senate, or both I have no doubt, from the evidence of which we cheerfully for it. But the law to which reference Houses, in order to distribute them. have heard, as well as from the ability of the com is made, clearly, in its letter and intent, restrains The PRESIDENT. The resolution cannot be piler of the charts, that they are very useful to the action of the Senate in this matter, and I can

altered unless by unanimous consent, or by moving navigators on the Pacific coast; but I have yet to not violate that law.

a reconsideration. learn, and if I should learn it would be with great Mr. BORLAND. I shall not contend with the

HOUR OF MEETING. concern, that it is the province of the Senate to Senators who have just spoken, upon the meaning enter on the course of purchasing charts for the which they attach to the word "chart" and the Mr. WALKER. I submit the following resouse of navigators. If they are required, as doubl. similarity of meaning which they seem to think lution: less they are, there is an abundance of money exists between that and the word “ book;' but Resolved, That hereafter the hour of meeting of the Senability in those who use them to purchase them. there is another ground which I think very satis ate shall be ten o'clock, a. m., until otherwise ordered by the I shall therefore vote against the resolution. factory, upon which this proposition is not ex

Mr. GWIN. In regard to the first objection cluded by the terms of the law. The third section I will state to the Senate the reason why I shall which is made to the resolution, I will merely say, of the act referred to, in which the prohibition is ask for the consideration of that resolution at this that the charts are not a book; and we published i made, is in these words:

time. As we meet now, we do not sit while the at this session, by order of the Committee on Print

" That hereafter no books shall be distributed to mem Cabinet are in Cabinet council. They are in couning, fifteen hundred extra copies of a chart, show bers of Congress except such as are ordered to be printed cil during the morning, and come out about the ing the route from California to Shanghai for mail by the Congress of which they are members.

same time we commence our session. We theresteamers, which was very similar in its character, We well know the reason for that. We well fore cannot see them while we are idling away the though not so accurate as this. But in regard to know that there was a great complaint that mem morning. When our hour of meeting arrives, this work, I have reason to know this officer of bers of Congress were in the habit of voting them- | they have left Cabinet council and gone to the Dethe Navy, of whom I can speak in as much praise selves large quantities of books to be paid for out partments. Then we commence our sitling, and as the Senator from Virginia. He lost largely by 1 of the contingent fund of the respective Houses. | ihe result is that a great many Senators who have the publication of the charts, and I wish, on my It was considered an abuse; and the cry had gone business at the Departments have to go away, and part, to remunerate him, and through the hands

through the country and got into the newspapers we are left often without a quorum. Now, I have of the Secretary of the Navy to put the charts in

that we were voting ourselves libraries. The sec no doubt that there are a great many Senators possession of those who navigate those waters. tion which I have read was intended to meet that who have business to attend to at the Departments I am perfectly confident that we cannot make an case. But, sir, here is a very different thing.. It which they must transact, and they have gone expendicure of an equal amount by which more is proposed to purchase a valuable chart, call it a | away to attend to it, and I should not be surprised good can be brought to the Government than by book if you please, which the interests of naviga- || in a short time to-day, and on every subsequent purchasing these maps; but I will not detain the

tion very much require, because our commerce day, after this hour, to find ourselves left without Senate.

upon the Pacific ocean is very rapidly extending a quorum. If we can meet at ten o'clock, and sit Mr. BORLAND. I wish to say to the Senator and increasing; and it is also intended, as I said, | until one, we shall be sitting during the time when from Virginia, that I think he is mistaken in sup while subserving that great public purpose, to re the Cabinet are in council, and the Cabinet council posing that Congress published these charts. They imburse a meritorious public officer, who, at his and the session of the Senate will break up about were published, I believe, by Captain Ringgold own expense, published the work and has not yet the same time, and then we can have an opportuhimself, and Congress purchased some of them. received any return for it, notwithstanding its nity to transact our business at the Departments.

Mr. MASON. Yes, sir.
Mr. BORLAND. They were published at his

great public value. He is yet out of pocket sev- It is for this reason that I offer the resolution, and

eral thousand dollars. By passing the resolution, | ask for its consideration now. own expense. At first I was opposed to the res therefore, we shall not disregard the law, but we The PRESIDING OFFICER. Does any Senolution, but when I have evidence furnished me shall subserve the public interest and at the same ator object to considerimg the resolution at this from the Coast Survey office, and from other dis time do an act of justice to a meritorious officer. time? tinguished and competent sources, of their great The yeas and nays being taken on the resolu Mr. SEWARD and Mr. BUTLER. I object. value, indeed of the almost indispensable neces. tion, resulted-yeas 22, nays 16; as follows: Mr. WALKER. Withdraw the objection. sity to all our ships navigating the Pacific coast, and when I ascertained further, that the compiler

YEAS-Messrs. Atherton, Borland, Brodhead, Dodge of

Mr. BUTLER. I cannot withdraw the objecWisconsin, Douglas, Everett, Fitzpatrick, Gwin, Hamlin,

aion. I think our hour of meeting is well arranged has not been reimbursed by several thousand dol Houston, James, Jones of lowa, Morton, Norris, Pettit, || its it is. The Senate ought to deliberate sepalars for the cost which he has personally incurred,

Pratt, schastian, Seward,

Shields, Stuart, Thomson of rately and let the Cabinet officers do their own I am in favor of the resolution. He has conferred

New Jersey, and Weller-22.

NAYS-Messrs. Atchison, Badger, Dayard, Butler, business. This thing of Senators going to transact upon navigation in all that coast of the country, Chase, Clayton, Evans, Fish, Mason, Phelps, Smith, Soulé, business with the Departments and making an one of the greatest benefits which ever has been Sumner, Thompson of Kentucky, Toucey, and Wright-16. excuse for altering our hour of meeting is all conferred. We have the testimony of the Coast So the resolution was agreed to.

wrong. Whatever business they have with the Survey, that in the preparation of the maps which Mr. PRATT. I would suggest to the Senator || Departments ought to be done in writing. they have since made, they derived great benefit from California, the propriety of making some al Mr. WALKER. , I do not mean that this is to from these charts, and found them indispensable teration in the terms of the resolution, because it give Senators an opportunity to go to the Cabinet to the work, and saved a large expense and labor occurs to me, that under it, there is no power con councils--of course they cannot get there. But by having them. If we purchase these charts, it ferred to distribute the charts. The law of last there are many Senators who desire to see the will be for the benefit of navigation. The com session prohibits their being distributed to Senators heads of Departments on business; and the Cabinet piler has incurred great expense, and has not yet when they are purchased. Where are they to go? | council breaks up just about the time that we go been reimbursed; and it does seem to me nothing Mr. BÚTLER. To navigators.

into session now, and consequently we have no more than simple justice—to say nothing of the Mr. PRATT. How are they to get to naviga- | opportunity to attend to our departmental busibenefit conferred upon the interests of navigation- tors? I suggest that the resolution needs some If we go to the Departments in the mornto pay him as much for the use of the work as it modification in that respect.

ing we cannot find the heads of the Departments, cost him; and the additional copies which we pro Mr. BORLAND. I suppose, in authorizing the for they are in Cabinet council, and as soon as pose to purchase will not do more than repay the Secretary to purchase the charts for the use of they come out of council our session commences, money which he has paid out, and which has navigators, there is a general power given to him so that we have no time to see them; but if we gone to the benefit of the country.

to put them into the hands of navigators. That should meet at ten and adjourn at one we could Mr. BAYARD called for the yeas and nays on follows as a necessary consequence; and we are to attend to departmental business and senatorial the resolution, and they were ordered.

suppose that he will take a common-sense view of business also. The Senator asks me what busiMr. CHASE. I desire simply to say that the the subject, and adopt some reasonable practicable ness I have at the ments? remarks submitted by the Senator from California | plan by which they will go into the hands of those Mr. BUTLER. I do not. would convince me, if I needed any conviction for whom they are intended.

Mr. WALKER. I do not know whether the upon this subject, that this is a very meritorious Mr. BAYARD. Where is the authority, on Senator has any or not, but I can tell him that if work; and I would cheerfully vote for the resolu the part of any officer of this body to turn these he hailed from Wisconsin or any of the western tion, if I were not fully satisfied that it is against books over to any one else? Where does it spring or northern States, he would find the duty an both the letter and spirit of the prohibition in the from? When I'made my remarks upon the res operous one, which could not be thrown off. It law; and I trust the Senate will not, at this spe- 1 olution, I supposed it stood as it was originally I is imposed upon us, and some time must be taken

ness.

« ZurückWeiter »