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High-Tide Tables.

FOR GOVERNOR'S ISLAND, NEW YORK HARBOR,

(Specially prepared from the Tide-Tables of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey for THE WORLD ALMANAC.)

New York Mean Time. To express in Eastern Standard Time, subtract

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10 18
11 6

September.

October.

12 40

November.

A. M.

P. M.

A. M.

P. M.

A. M.

P. M.

December.

A. M. P. M.

H. M.

H. M.

H. M.

H. M.

H. M.

5 54

6 0

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HIGH-TIDE TABLES-Continued.

TIME OF HIGH WATER AT POINTS ON THE ATLANTIC COAST.

The local time of high water at the following places may be found approximately for each day by adding to or subtracting from the time of high water at Governor's Island, N. Y., the hours and minutes annexed.

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Heig' t
Feet.

San Francisco Mt...........

Blanca Peak

Bear Mt....

Dupont

EXAMPLE.-To find the approximate time of high tide at Atlantic City, N. J., on any day, find first the time of high water at New York under the desired date, and then subtract 20 minutes, as in the above table; the result is the time of high water required.

Greatest Altitude in Each State.

FROM THE RECORDS OF THE UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

STATE OR

TERRITORY.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California.

Colorado

Connecticut..

Delaware

Name of Place

Cheauha Mt. (TalladegaCo.)
*Not named..

Magazine Mt..

Mt. Whitney.

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D. of Columbia.. Tenley

Florida

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Mossyhead

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Hyndman Peak.

12,073 Oregon

Mt. Hood.

11,225

Warren

1,009 Pennsylvania... Negro Mt........

2,826

Haley

1.140 Rhode Island... Durfee Hill..

805

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Indian Territ' y Sugarloaf.

Iowa

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Big Black Mt. (Harlan Co.) 4,100 Texas

Great Backbone Mt....

Massachusetts.. Mt. Greylock...

321 Utah....

5,200 Vermont

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3,400 Virginia...
3.535 Washington

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2.023 West Virginia..

Spruce Mt. (Pendleton Co.)

4,860

2,000 Wisconsin..
566 Wyoming.
1,675

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Summit Lake....

1,732

Frémont Peak.

13,790

Missouri

NOTE.-The above table was prepared for THE WORLD ALMANAC by the Geographic Branch of the United States Geological Survey. It should be stated in connection with this table that it presents only points whose heights are matters of record, and that in several cases in the high mountain region of the far West and the Pacific Slope it is well known that there are higher points within the State or Territory whose heights are not yet known with accuracy, and consequently cannot be given. This table was revised by the United States Geological Survey to November 1, 1898.

Mt. St. Elias, supposed to be the highest point in Alaska, is now believed to be in Canadian territory. There are reports of mountains in Alaska far to the northwest higher than Mt. St. Elias, but not yet verified.

+ Western end of Beaver County, Oklahoma, reaches 5,000 feet elevation.

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Postal Distances and Time from New York City.

As indicated by the Official Postal Guide, showing the distance by shortest routes and time in transit by fastest trains from New York City.

CITIES IN UNITED STATES. Miles. Hours. CITIES IN UNITED STATES. Miles. Hours. CITIES IN UNITED STATES. Miles. Hours.

Albany, N. Y.......
Atlanta, Ga.....

Baltimore, Md..
Bismarck, N. Dak..
Boisé City, Idaho...
Boston, Mass....
Buffalo, N. Y..
Cape May, N. J....
Carson City, Nev..
Charleston, S._C....
Chattanooga, Tenn.

Detroit, Mich..

244 Galveston, Tex.

Harrisburg, Pa..

60% Hartford, Ct....

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Cheyenne, Wyo..

1,899

56

Chicago, Ill..

900

25

Milwaukee, Wis..
Montgomery, Ala..

Cincinnati, O.

744

23% Montpelier, Vt.....

Cleveland, O.

568

Columbus, 0.

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19% New Orleans, La.
Omaha, Neb.

Concord, N. H.

292

9% Philadelphia, Pa....

Deadwood, S. Dak.

1,957

65% Pittsburgh, Pa.

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60% Portland, Me..

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3716

Savannah, Ga...

40 Tacoma, Wash..
294 Topeka, Kan..
30% Trenton, N. J...
104 Vicksburg, Miss...

Vinita, Ind. Ter..
Washington, D. C...
Wheeling, W. Va...
Wilmington, Del..
Wilmington, N. C...

DISTANCES AND MAIL TIME TO FOREIGN CITIES FROM THE CITY OF NEW YORK.

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854

30

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1,163

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985

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1,057

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327

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1,344

40

1,383

43

90

431

325

23332

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117

5

12

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MUNICH 266 470 295 401 579 522 1897 1477 ROME 647 840 414 639 1048 1180 1033 1746 1223 TRIESTE 510 487 370 391 533 888 1066 1009 1828 1416 863 1352 1150 WARSAW 806 1276 702 436 1156 1021 398 576 895 2593 1925 1067 1557 1355 CONSTANTINOPLE 1205 1725 2138 1564 1298 2018 1883 1699 1903 2025 2345 2718 1899 2232 2030 ODESSA 363 842 1330 1800 1226 960 1680 1545 1240 1418 1737 3117 2625 1760 2119 1917 Moscow 950 1339 811 1617 2087 1513 1247 1967 1832 1209 1387 1706 3414 2904 1843 2117 1915 ST. PETERSBURG 406 1356 1733 693 1769 2239 1395 399 2119 1714 1091 1269 1588 3286 2874 1699 1976 1774 STOCKHOLM 430 836 1510 2408 1082 1171 1731 1084 1110 1337 1176 685 580 993 2384 1972 1219 1491 1289 COPENHAGEN 416 846 1252 1510 1510 668 1067 1318 671 697 1047 885 270 208 620 2012 1600 812 1181 979

(Revised December, 1898, at the New York Post-Office, for THE WORLD ALMANAG.)

DOMESTIC RATES OF POSTAGE.

ALL mailable matter for transmission by the United States mails within the United States is divided into four classes, under the following regulations :

First-Class Matter.-This class includes letters, postal cards, and anything sealed or otherwise closed against inspection, or anything containing writing not allowed as an accompaniment to printed matter under class three.

Rates of letter postage to any part of the United States, two cents per ounce or fraction thereof. Rates on local or drop letters at free delivery offices, two cents per ounce or fraction thereof. At offices where there is no free delivery by carriers, one cent per ounce or fraction thereof.

Rates on postal cards, one cent (double or reply" cards, two cents). Nothing must be added or attached to a postal card, except that a printed address slip may be pasted on the address or message side. The addition of anything else subjects the card to letter postage. A card containing any offensive dun or any scurrilous or indecent communication will not be forwarded. The rule that has heretofore existed excluding from the face of a postal card words indicating the occupation or business of the addressee has been revoked. In future these additions, or others of a like general character, will be held to be constructively a part of the address, and therefore permissible. Cards that have been spoiled in printing or otherwise will not be rcdecmed. Private mailing cards bearing written messages can be transmitted in the domestic mails at the po tal charge of one cent each. Cards must not exceed the size of 34 by 51⁄2 inches or be smaller than 2 15-16 by 4 15-16 inches in dimensions. Their quality must be substantially that of the Government postal cards and weigh about six pounds three ounces to the thousand. Their color may be white, cream, light gray, or light buff. The cards must bear on

the address side, in print, the words "Private Mailing Card-Authorized by Act of Congress of May 19, 1898. When prepared for sale they should also bear in the upper right-hand corner of the address side a diagram with the words Place a one-cent stamp here," and in the lower left-hand corner the printed words "This side is exclusively for the address."'

The message on the cards may be in writing or print, and there may also appear on the message side advertisements, illustrations, or other matter, printed either in black or colors. And there must be attached to every card mailed a one-cent adhesive postage stamp. These cards cannot be mailed to foreign countries except at the letter rate of postage. Double or reply'' postal cards must be folded before being mailed.

Rates on specially delivered letters, ten cents on each letter in addition to the regular postage. This entitles the letter to immediate delivery by special messenger. Special delivery stamps are sold at post-offices, and must be affixed to such letters. An ordinary ten-cent stamp affixed to a letter will not entitle it to special delivery. The delivery, at carrier offices, extends to the limits of the carrier routes. At non-carrier offices it extends to one mile from the post-office. Postmasters are not obliged to deliver beyond these limits, and letters addressed to places beyond must await delivery in the usual way, notwithstanding the special delivery stamp.

Prepayment by stamps invariably required. Postage on all letters should be fully prepaid, but if prepaid one full rate and no more, they will be forwarded, and the amount of deficient postage collected on delivery; if wholly unpaid, or prepaid with less than one full rate and deposited at a post-office, the addressee will be notified to remit postage; and if he fails to do so, they will be sent to the Dead Letter Office; but they will be returned to the sender if he is located at the place of mailing, and if his address be printed or written upon them.

Letter rates are charged on all productions by the typewriter or manifold process, and on all printed imitations of typewriting or manuscript, unless such reproductions are presented at post-office windows in the minimum number of twenty identical copies.

Letters (but no other class of mail matter) will be returned to the sender free, if a request to that effect is printed or written on the envelope. There is no limit of weight for first-class matter. Prepaid letters will be reforwarded from one post-office to another upon the written request of the person addressed, without additional charge for postage. The direction on forwarded letters may be changed as many times as may be necessary to reach the person addressed.

Second-Class Matter. This class includes all newspapers, periodicals, or matter exclusively in print and regularly issued at stated intervals as frequently as four times a year, from a known office of publication or news agency, to actual subscribers or news agents, and transient newspapers and publications of this character mailed by persons other than publishers. Also periodical publications of benevolent and fraternal societies, etc. This applies to all reports and the like made by officers of societies organized under the lodge system and having a membership of a thousand persons, and of the bulletins and proceedings of strictly professional, literary, historical, and scientific associations and institutions, trade unions, etc., provided only that these be published not less often than four times a year, and that they be printed on and be bound in paper. Publishers who wish to avail themselves of the privileges of the act are required to make formal application to the department through the postmaster at the place of publication, producing satisfactory evidence that the organizations represented come within the purview of the law, and that the object of the publications is to further the objects and purposes of the organizations.

Rates of postage to publishers, one cent a pound or fractional part thereof, prepaid in currency. Publications designed primarily for advertising or free circulation, or not having a legitimate list of subscribers, are excluded from the pound rate, and pay third-class rates.

Whenever the general character and manner of issue of a periodical publication is changed in the interest of the publisher, or of an advertiser or other person, by the addition of unusual quantities of advertisements, or of matter different from that usually appearing in the publication, or calculated to give special prominence to some particular business or businesses, or otherwise-especially where large numbers of copies are circulated by or in the interest of particular persons, or where there is to be an excessive number of alleged sample copies mailed, or

where the issue is to be sold at a special and different price than that charged for the customary issues, the second-class rates of postage will be denied that issue; and if there be repeated instances of such irregularities, the publication will be excluded from the mails as second-class matter.

as

Such Christmas," New Year's," and other special issues, including "Almanacs, are excluded from second-class privileges by the terms above specified may be transmitted by mail only when prepaid by postage-stamps at the rate applicable to third-class matter-one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof.

Publications sent to actual subscribers in the county where published are free, unless mailed for local delivery at a letter-carrier office.

Rates of postage on transient newspapers, magazines, or periodicals, one cent for each four ounces or fraction thereof. It should be observed that the rate is one cent for each four ounces, not one cent for each paper contained in the same wrapper. Second-class matter will be entitled to special delivery when special delivery ten-cent stamps are affixed in addition to the regular postage.

Transient second-class matter must be so wrapped as to enable the postmaster to inspect it. The sender's name and address may be written in them, but any other writing subjects the matter to letter postage. The name and address of the sender may also be written on the wrapper. Third-Class Matter.-Mail matter of the third class includes printed books, pamphlets, engravings, circulars (in print or by the hectograph, electric-pen, or similar process), and other matter wholly in print, proof-sheets, corrected proof-sheets, and manuscript copy accompanying the same. The rate on matter of this class is one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. Manuscript unaccompanied by proof-sheets must pay letter rates.

Third-class matter must admit of easy inspection, otherwise it will be charged letter rates oL delivery. It must be fully prepaid, or it will not be forwarded.

The limit of weight is four pounds, except single books in separate packages, on which the weight is not limited. It is entitled, like matter of the other classes, to special delivery when special delivery stamps are affixed in addition to the regular postage.

Upon matter of the third-class, or upon the wrapper or envelope inclosing the same, or the tag or label attached thereto, the sender may write his own name, occupation, and residence or business address, preceded by the word "from," and may make marks other than by written or printed words to call attention to any word or passage in the text, and may correct any typographical errors. There may be placed upon the blank leaves or cover of any book, or printed matter of the third-class, a simple manuscript dedication or inscription not of the nature of a personal correspondence. Upon the wrapper or envelope of third-class matter, or the tag or label attached thereto, may be printed any matter mailable as third-class, but there must be left on the address side a space sufficient for the legible address and necessary stamps.

Fourth-Class Matter.-Fourth-class matter is all mailable matter not included in the three preceding classes which is so prepared for mailing as to be easily withdrawn from the wrapper and examined. It embraces merchandise and samples of every description, and coin or specie.

Rate of postage, one cent for each ounce or fraction thereof (except seeds, roots, bulbs, cuttings, cions, and plants, the rate on which is one cent for each two ounces or fraction t ercof). This matter must be fully prepaid, or it will not be forwarded. The affixing of special delivery ten-cent stamps in addition to the regular postage entitles fourth-class matter to special delivery. (See remarks under "first-class matter."')

Articles of this class that are liable to injure or deface the mails, such as glass, sugar, needles, nails, pens, etc., must be first wrapped in a bag, box, or open envelope and then secured in another outside tube or box, made of metal or hard wood, without sharp corners or edges, and having a sliding clasp or screw lid, thus securing the articles in a double package. The public should bear in mind that the first object of the department is to transport the mails safely, and every other interest is made subordinate.

Such articles as poisons, explosives, or inflammable articles, live animals, insects, or substances exhaling a bad odor will not be forwarded in any case.

Firearms may only be sent in detached parts.

The regulations respecting the mailing of liquids are as follows: Liquids, not ardent, vinous, spirituous, or malt, and not liable to explosion, spontaneous combustion, or ignition by shock or jar, and not inflammable (such as kerosene, naphtha, or turpentine), may be admitted to the mails for transportation within the United States. When in glass bottles or vials, such bottles or vials must be strong enough to stand the shock of handling in the mails, and must be inclosed in a metal, wooden, or papier mache block or tube, not less than three-sixteenths of an inch thick in the thinnest part, strong enough to support the weight of mails piled in bags and resist rough handling; and there must be provided, between the bottle and said block or tube, a cushion of cotton, felt, or some other absorbent sufficient to protect the glass from shock in handling; the block or tube to be closed by a tightly fitting lid or cover, so adjusted as to make the block or tube water tight and to prevent the leakage of the contents in case of breaking the glass. When inclosed in a tin cylinder, metal case, or tube, such cylinder, case, or tube chould have a lid or cover so secured as to make the case or tube water tight, and should be securely fastened in a wooden or papier mache block (open only at one end), and not less in thickness and strength than above described. Manufacturers or dealers intending to transmit articles or samples in considerable quantities should submit a sample package, showing their mode of packing, to the postmaster at the mailing office, who will see that the conditions of this section are carefully observed. The limit of admissible liquids and oils is not exceeding four ounces, liquid measure.

Limit of weight of fourth-class matter (excepting liquids), four pounds.

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