An Introduction to the Study of Education and to Teaching

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Houghton Mifflin, 1925 - 476 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

Increasing Costs for Education 7 Forms for School Administration Used in the United States
65
New England Towns and Western Townships Compared
68
District Organization
70
OUR SCHOOLS BOTH STATE AND LOCAL INSTITU
75
THE SCHOOL BOARD AND ITS PROBLEMS
89
Frequency of Size of School Boards
90
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL SUPERVISION
106
Status of School Supervision in the United States by 1861
107
THE WORK AND TRAINING OF THE TEACHER
127
A PHILOSOPHY OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS
149
Professional Rating Sheet and Score Card 163
163
EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILD
167
326
188
THE PUPILS AND THEIR NEEDS
189
Plan of Organization for a City School System 13 The Equipment of a Teacher 14 Showing Growth in Height and Weight
190
Acceleration and Retardation in One School
194
AgeDistribution in One 5B Class
195
The Distribution of Intelligence among School Children
198
THE LEARNING PROCESS
210
Heredity Environment and Training
213
Learning Curves of Two Pupils
218
A Picture in Three Lines
221
THE TEACHING PROCESS
230
SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL CLASSIFICATION
251
The ParallelCourse Plan
254
Grade Norms for the Ayres Handwriting Scale
259
Results of a Spelling Test with Three FifthGrade Classes
261
Median Scores of a SixthGrade Class
262
Showing Improvement in OralReading Rate
263
A Boy in Need of SpecialClass Instruction
268
THE CURRICULUM AND EDUCATIONAL REOR
273
The DifferentiatedCourse Plan
278
The Reorganization of American Education
293
THE SOCIAL RELATIONS OF THE SCHOOLS
297
Home Street School and Other Influences
299
THE SCHOOL PLANT
317
An ElementarySchool Room before the Graded System
319
ADULT VOCATIONAL AND EXTENSION EDU
336
Who Constitute our Illiterates
342
Relative Efficiency of a Typical Factory Group
347
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
355
Where the University of Indiana Began in 1824
358
Increase in Student Body of a Few State Universities
363
THE PROBLEM OF THE RURAL Child
372
OneRoom Schools by States and Teachers in such
375
A Typical Rural School of the Better Class
377
How the Chief County or Town School Officer is Secured
379
One Reason why Intelligent Farmers Move to the Cities
384
RURALSCHOOL REORGANIZATION
392
Location of Consolidated Schools in Iowa
396
A Common Result of Voluntary Consolidation
398
Progress of Consolidation in One Indiana County
400
Plan of Educational Organization for a CountyUnit School System
405
Rural Educational Reorganization
407
FINANCING PUBLIC EDUCATION
413
District Inequalities in One Nebraska County
416
Inequalities in Wealth of Massachusetts Cities and Towns
417
Inequalities in Wealth of California Counties
418
Assessed Valuation per Child in Illinois Counties
419
Inequalities in Tax Rates in One Illinois County
422
Sources of Revenue for School Support 18901920
426
THE INCREASING SIZE OF OUR EDUCA
436
Total Cost for Education in the United States
437
Total Cost in Relation to Purchasing Power
438
Showing Recent Rapid Growth in HighSchool Enroll ment
440
PerCapita Expenditures for Government in the United States
442
Expenditures for Education and Income Compared by States
443
Annual Bill for Luxuries and Education Compared
444
Costs for Education and Government Compared in Cities
445
Where the 1920 Tax Dollar went State and City
446
PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS IN THE ORGANI
456
INDEX
467
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Seite 356 - God's worship, and settled the civil government, one of the next things we longed for and looked after was to advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches, when our present ministers shall lie in the dust.
Seite 159 - Consequently, education in a democracy, both within and without the school, should develop in each individual the knowledge, interests, ideals, habits, and powers whereby he will find his place and use that place to shape both himself and society toward ever nobler ends .... This commission, therefore, regards the following as the main objectives of education: 1.
Seite 145 - Harvard College pays me for doing what I would gladly pay it for allowing me to do. No professional man, then, thinks of giving according to measure. Once engaged, he gives his best, gives his personal interest, himself. His heart is in his work, and for this no equivalent is possible...
Seite 452 - But my point is that the people of the United States do not wish to curtail the activities of this Government; they wish, rather, to enlarge them...
Seite 231 - The two ideas of science and art differ from one another as the understanding differs from the will, and as the indicative mode in Grammar differs from the imperative. The one deals in facts, and the other in precepts. Science is a collection of truths ; art is a body of rules, or directions for the conduct. The language of science is, This is, or This is not ; This does 'or does not happen. The language of art is, Do this ; Avoid that.
Seite 146 - Discipline, gives a composite judgment of one hundred experienced school men on the elements entering into "teaching personality," as follows: 1. Sympathy 6. Enthusiasm 2. Personal appearance 7. Scholarship 3. Address 8.
Seite 199 - Educational significance of intelligence measurements. The educational significance of this new means of determining the mental ability of school children is very large. Questions relating to proper classification in school, grading, promotion, choice of studies, amount of work, schoolroom procedure, vocational guidance, and the proper handling of sub-normal children on the one hand and gifted children on the other, all acquire new meaning in the light of intelligence measurements.
Seite 61 - State to formulate a constructive policy for the development of the education of the people of the State, and to change this policy from time to time as the changing needs of the State may seem to require. This may involve more than the mere regulation of schools, and may properly include such educational agencies and efforts as libraries, playgrounds, health supervision, and adult education. Instead of being a passive tax-gatherer and lawgiver, the State should become an active, energetic agent,...
Seite 159 - Education in the United States should be guided by a clear conception of the meaning of democracy. It is the ideal of democracy that the individual and society may find fulfillment each in the other.
Seite 451 - ... and the embarrassments hitherto found in this country, from the financing of education, will come to an end.

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