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Ala.

Nebr....

Del....

35

N.D...

20 1.23' Coal, Iron ore, cement, stone

43 .10 Cement, sand, gravel, stone, Alaska 20 .61 Gold, plat, metals, coal, silver

clay prod. Ariz 15 1.77 Copper, gold, silver, lead

Nev, 25

.82 Copper, gold, silver, tungsten Ark 29 .70 Petro., coal, bauxite, nat. gas

ore Calll. 3 11.04 Petroleum, nat, gas, gold, nat.IN. H.... 47 .03 Stone, clay prod., sand, gravel, gasoline

feldspar Colo. 17 1.51 Molybd., coal, gold, silver N. J..... 28 .71 Zinc, clay prod., sand, gravel, Conn. 44 .10 Stone, clay prod., sand, gravel,

stone lime

N. M.... 16 1.65 Petrol., copper, nat. g2B, 50 .01 Clay prod., stone, sand, gravel

potassium salts raw clay

N. Y. 14

1.85 Nat. gas, cement, petrol, stone D. of C.. 49 01 Clay products

N. C.... 33 .44 Stone, clay prod., bromine, Fla. .31 Phosph. rock, cement, stone,

sand, gravel sand, gravel

46 .06 Coal, sand, gravel, clay prod.. Ga.. 34 .35 Stone, raw clay, prod, cement

nat. gas Idaho 26 .78 Silver, lead, zinc, gold

Ohio.. 9 2.83 Coal, clay prod., nat. gas, stone III. 6 4.97 Petroleum, coal, stone, cement Okla.

5 5.58 Petrol., nat. gas, nat. gasoline, Ind. 19 1.26 Coal, cement, stone, clay prod.

zinc Iowa. 31 .60 Cement, coal, stone, clay prod. Oreg.

38 20 Gold, stone, cem., sand, gravel Kan.. 8 2.91 Petrol., nat. gas, zinc, cement Pa.

2 12.57 Coal, petrol., nat. gas, cement Ку. 11 2.67 Coal, nat. gas, petrol., stone R. I

48 .02 Stone, sand, gravel, clay prod., La. 7 3.99 Petrol.. nat. gas, sulfur, nat.

lime gasoline

S. C.. 41 .13 Stone, clay prod., raw clay.gold 45 .09 Stone, sand, gravel, cement. | S. D. 32 .59 Gold stone, cement, sand gravel clay prod.

Tenn 23

.95 Coal, stone, cem., phosph, rock Mā. 37 .28 Coal, sand, gravel, cement, clay | Texas. 1 16.57 Petrol., nat. gas, sulfur, nat. prod.

gasoline Mass. 39 .19 Stone, sand, gravel, lime, clay | Utah 13 1.89 Copper, gold, silver, coal prod.

Vt.

40 16 Stone, slate, lime, asbestos Mich 10 2.74 Iron ore, petrol., cement, copper Va.

22 1.03 Coal, stone, clay prod., cement Minn.. 12 2.51 Iron ore, stone, sand, gravel, Wash. 27 .75 Cement, sand, gravel, coal, gold manganil, ore.

W. Va

6.51 Coal, nat. gas, petrol, stone Miss. 42 .12 Nat. gas, sand, gravel, clay Wisc.. 36 .30 Stone, iron ore, sand, gravel, prod., raw clay

cement
Mo.
21 1.08 Lead, cement, coal, stone

Wyo...
24 .93 Petrol., coal, nat.

ges, nat. Mont.. 18 1.50 Copper, gold, nat. gas, silver

gasoline In the above table iron ore, not pig iron, is taken as the basis of iron valuation, and for other metals mine production (recoverable content of metals) is the basis.

Ne...

Value of Mineral Products of the U. S., 1905-1939

Source: United States Bureau of Mines
Non metallic

Nonmetallic
Year Metallic
Grand Year Metallic

Grand
Fuels Total Total

Fuels Total Total $1.000 $1.000 $1.000 $1,000

$1,000 $1000 $1,000 $1,000 1905 702,785 602,258 920,980 1,623,765 1923.

1,511,9303,317,100 4,474,5705,986,500 1906 886,280 652,398 1,014,600 1,900,880 1924

1,233,370 2,898,630 4,072,430 5,305,800 1907

904,151 789,128 1,165,4192.069,5701925 1,382, 155 3,058,680 4,295,475 5,677,630 1908 550,890 716,034 1,040,8831,591,773 1926

1,405,345 3,541,916 4,808,255 6.213,600 1909 755,092 746,204 1,132,015 1,887,107 | 1927

1,220,633 3,060,047 4,309,367 5.530,000 1910 750,027 828,213 1,237,817 1,987,844 1928

1,288 290 2,884,962 4.096,910 5,385,200 1911 681.023 835,763 1,243,058 1.924,081 1929

1,480,390 3,190,527 4,470,210 5,887,600 1912 862,191 945,541 1.375,603 2,237,794 1930.

985,790 2,764,500 3.779,010 4,764,800 1913 879,058 1,087,843 1,554,487 2,433,545 1931.

569,790 1,892,40012,596,810 3,166,600 1914 687,101 992,837 1,424,0712,111,172 1932

285,875 1,743,400 2,175,825 2,461,700 1915 993,353 972,617 1,401.291 2.394,644 1933

417.065 1.683,400 2,138,035 2,555,100 1916. 1,622,129 1,332,584 1.886,310 3,508,439 1934

548,934 2,233,300 2,776,466/3,325,400 1917 2,088,914 2,237,837 2,903,5824,992,496

1935

733.130 2,330.000 2,916,870 3.650.000 1918 2,156,588 2,736,151 3,384,120 5,540,708 1936

1,081,600 2,759,200 3,475,200 4,556,800 1,361,099 2,510,894 3,262,6714,623,770 1937

1,468,2003,200.500 3,945,2005,413,400 1920 1.763,675 4,192,910 5,217,6656,981,340 1938

892,600 2,820,300 3,470,600 4,363,200 1921. 654,700 2,703, 470 3,483,800 4,138,500 1939

1.291,200 2,834,200 3,623,100|4,914,300 1922.

988, 100/2,737.880 3,659, 190|4,647,290 1940 (1,677,700 3,080,200 3,904,800|5,582,500 Fuels are coal, natural gas, natural petroleum.

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1919

TUNGSTEN Universal armament activities in 1940 put further As the defense program progresses it is exemphasis on the strategic nature of tungsten. In-pected that molybdenum will be substituted for creased demands and disturbed flow from producing certain tungsten high-speed steels. Consumption areas upset usual commercial relations, and sup- of cemented carbide is increasing rapidly, but a plies became a matter of national concern to the pound of tungsten goes much farther in machining larger consuming countries. Despite increasing operations as cemented carbide than as high-speed difficulties in moving Chinese tungsten-the prin-steel. Small quantities of tantalum carbide and cipal world supply-exports from China continued. titanium carbide are also used. but tungsten caralthough at a greatly reduced rate.

bide dominates the cemented-carbide industry. With Japanese occupation of most of the Chinese Of outstanding interest among the transformaports, movement of tungsten shifted to flow out of tions made by the chemists are those where coke Indochina; this was stopped in July but was offset and lime are converted into calcium carbide in an somewhat by reopening of the Burma Road in electric furnace. October With the diminution of Chinese con- Calcium carbide and water yield acetylene gas, centrates, output in other countries was stimulated which is used for light and in oxy-acetylene equipin 1940, notably in Portugal, the United States ment for cutting steel or for welding. This gas can and Latin America.

be used also to make acetic acid and vinegar.

[graphic]

Dollars
Dollars
Dollars

Dollars Alabarna.

44,752,688 53,518,993 46,296,293 52,124,382 Alaska.

23,737,714 27,927,958 28,796,753 25,673,566 Arizona.

60,532,996 94,564,494 60,756,253 75,056,965 Arkansas

21,296,783 25,578,393 29,395,086 29,507,194 California.

437,565,809 476,880,603 490,108,428 467,612,196 Colorado,

56,214,827 67,338,548 60,369,440 64,071,621 Connecticut.

3,317,494 3,689,554 3,059,688 4,306,351 Delaware

444,093
397,362
320,621

401,333 District of Columbia

547,576
522,687
568,717

591,837 Florida ..

12,973,243 13,811,958 12,866,981 13.060,453 Georgia.

11,756,592 12,584,060 11,598,421 14,633,361 Idaho.

29,965,964 40,633,119 31,738,606 33,138,635 Illinois.

117,916,128 133,437,554 130,155,083 210,295,738 Indiana

52,281,539 54,886,756 47,892,364 53,423,223 Iowa.

28,359,140 26,941,350 24,794,058 25,483,936 Kansas

121,689,562 154,376,403 129,675,438 123,391,521 Kentucky

113,435,307 127,423,680 106,654,903 113,243, 154 Louisiana

153,358,397 182,118,905 172,306,761 168,902,949 Maine..

3,423,353 4,129,391

3,548,638

3.769,671 Maryland

11.157,550 10,634,854 9,407,723 11,837,593 Massachusetts

7,559, 253
7,813,345
6.666.281

8,179,860 Michigan

100,646,492 119,167,573 81,380,602 115,969,514 Minnesota

94,568,991 152, 107.070 51,425,289 106,427,607 Mississippi..

3,846,104 4,821,950

5,209,547

5,192,156 Missouri

41,350,860 52,446,272 39,560.739 45,619,104 Montana.

65,569,150 82,086,815 48,602,547 63,354,645 Nebraska

3,843,562 4,837,809 4,028,712 4,390,291 Nevada.

32,693,129 38,871,816 27,031,281 34.670,879 New Hampshire

1,182,055 1,219,869 1,146,606 1,187,339 New Jersey.

24,421,046 31,467,931 24,408,545 30,271,293 New Mexico

45,942,006 72,855,745 63,568,953 69,921,765 New York

71,647,775 77.665,874 73,217,430 78,383,851 North Carolina

9.955,519 11,160,444 14,959,228 18,533,720 North Dakota

2,902, 453 2,873,011 2,653,473 2,689,627 Ohio

122,684,043 131,025,104 104,812,531 119,750,853 Oklahoma.

305,191,649 367,444,222 272,860,078 236,176,614 Oregon

7,080,975 6,609,710 7,536,408 8,636,440 Pennsylvania

599,457,486 599,817,364 472,773,327 532,355,651 Rhode Island

929,103
862,710
911,599

980,916 South Carolina

3,432,662

4,022,325 4,364,034 5,422,979 South Dakota

23,221.620 23,472,873 23,583,359 24,811,231 Tennessee

31,121,865 34,893,847 32,428,512 40,119,893 Texas.

638,643,488 813,290,605 740,147,465 701,939,862 Utah

61,209,302 105,652,422 59,236,355 80,221,937 Vermont

6,225,396 7.042,547 6,439,552 6,972,234 Virginia

37,295,168 46,019,085 42,370,169 43,582,537 Washington

22,921,456 26,658,257 21.167,004 31,590,023 West Virginia

271,501,941 306,590,947 254,995,309 275,562,954 Wisconsin

13,277,983 15,239,524 10.636,741 12,704,942 Wyoming

34,498,261 41,087,908 37,364,363 39,425,468 In this table iron ore, not pig iron, is taken as the basis of valuation of iron, and in the case of other metals mine production (recoverable content of metals) is the basis. Pig Iron and Steel Output of Chief Countries

Source: American Iron & Steel Institute gr.

t.=gross tons (2,240 lbs.); met. t.=metric tons (2,204.6 lbs) United United

AlsaceStates Kingdom Germany France Belgium Canada Lorraine Year Iron Steel Iron Steel Iron Steel Iron Steel Iron Steel Iron Steel Iron Steel

1,000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

gr. t. gr. t. gr. t. gr. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. met. t. 1920.. 36.926 42,133.8.035 9,067 6,388 8,537 3,344 2,7061 1,116 1.253 999 1,110 1,369 845 1925. 36,701 45,393 6,262 7,385 10,089 12,194 8,494 7,446 2,542 2,548 596 756 3,287 2,629 1926.. 39,373 48,294 2,458 3,596 9,643 12,342 9,432 8.430 3,368 3,339 815 782 3,5742,800 1927. 36,566 44,935 7.293 9,097 13,102 16,311 9,326 8,306 3.709 3.680 766 916 3,381 2,734 1928. 38,156 61,544 6,610 8,520 11,804 14,517) 9,981 9,500 3,857 3,905 1,083 1,239 3,634 2.967 1929. 42.614 56,433 7.589 9,636 13,40116.246 10,364 9.699 4,041 4,109 1.160 1.391 3.806 2.985 1930. 31,752 40,699 6,192 7,326 9,694 11,539 10,035 9,447 3.365 3.354 812 1.009 3.512 2,874 1931 18,426 25,945 3,772 5,203 6,063 8,292 8,199 7,822 3.198 3,105 467 671 2,819 2,371 1932. 8,781 13,681 3.573 5,261 3,932 5,751 5,537 5,640 2.749 2.790 160 335 1,933 1,759 1933. 13,346123,232 4,124 7.0031 5,267! 7,586' 6,324 6,531 2,744 2,689 258 402 2.1961 2,086

Figures represent, for all countries, 1,000 gross tons, of 2,240 lbs. 1934.. 16,138,26,055 5,969 8,850 8,604 11.740 3,935 4.182 2,861 2.900 438 741) 2,119 1.895 1935. 21,373 34,093 6,424 9,859 12.342 15.842 3.631 4,237 2,982 2.975 655 915) 2,067 1,941 1936. 31,029 47,768 7,721 11,785 15,06118,460 3,850 4,429 3,111 3,118 747| 1,078 2,281 2,173 1937. 37,127 50.569 8,493 12,964|15,706 19,5364,986 5,205 3,782 3.808 979 1,352 2.806 2,574 1938. 19,161 28,350 6,763 10,394 18,221 22,876 5,954 6.077 2,246 2.249 7581 1,127 1939 35.677 52.799 9,183 15,119 24,304 29,617| 8,736 9.407 3,382 3,429 930 1,509 1940. 47,398 66,983 9,300/15,000/23,100/28,150 5,100 6,100 2,450) 2,5001 1,4471 2,174

Other 1940 steel production (1,000 net tons)-Luxemburg (1,450); Hungary (900); Italy (2,800); Russia (21,800); Spain (565); Sweden (980); Japan (7,100).

Figures for 1939 and since represent 1,000 net tons.
Iron means pig iron and ferro alloys. Steel means steel ingots and castings.
German figures, 1935 and since include Saar. Lorraine.
French figures exclude, 1934 and since. Alsace-
Production in 1940 of steel rails totaled 1,678,986 net tons.
The investment in 1940 in the iron and steel industry was $4,262,697,793.
Net income, $281,079,700; stockholders numbered 537,325; federal taxes, $127,136,380; state and local
taxes, $98,024,194; cash dividends paid, $137,817,640.
Employes numbered 719,683: wages and salaries in the year, $1,179,800,006.

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508 U. S.-Aluminum and the War; Quarry Production

Aluminum and the War

Source: U. S. Bureau of Mines; U. S. Geological Survey Aluminum has become of extraordinary impor- Co. planned the production of primary metal at tance because of its use in the construction of air- the yearly rate of 60,000,000 pounds in 1941 and

to further increase this output in 1942. planes--more particularly war planes, by reason

The tremendous demand for aluminum in 1940 of its light weight and freedom from oxidation. It

is attributed chiefly to the high rate of activity is found chiefly in New York, Tennessee, and North

in National Defense industries. The airplane is Carolina,

made principally of aluminum and in 1940 this Bauxite, which is used principally in the manu

industry greatly increased its consumption and facture of metallic aluminum, comes, so far as placed orders for much larger quantities of metal this country is concerned, largely from Arkansas, for 1941 and 1942. In addition to the building Alabama, and Georgia.'

of a huge air armada, industry used the light but Primary aluminum totaling 412,560,000 pounds strong metal for many other uses in 1940. Notvalued at $75,292,210 was produced in the United withstanding the record output of new metal, it States in 1940 contrasted with 327,090,000 pounds was necessary for the producer to withdraw 60,valued at $64,600,000 in 1939. The apparent con: 375,000 pounds of aluminum from stocks in 1940 sumption of primary aluminum in 1940 totaled (62,886,000 pounds in 1939). 454,034,409 pounds compared with 335,337,860 World production of bauxite in 1939 was 3,650,000 pounds in 1939,

metric tons. They came from France, Hungary In order to meet the requirements of the national Italy. Yugoslavia and Greece, in the order named defense program, aluminum production will be as to tonnage. further increased in 1941 and 1942 at the five re- Aluminum world production in 1939 was 650.000 duction plants of the Aluminum Co. of America metric tons, of which the German Empire supplied and at a new plant of the Reynolds Metals Co. at 210.000 tons. Lister (near Sheffield), Alabama. Output is ex- Approximately one half of the weight of airpected to reach an annual rate of 825,000,000 planes made in the United States is aluminum. pounds by July 1942.

W. L. Batt, of the Office of Production ManageOf the 412,560,000 pounds of primary aluminum ment testified before the Senate Committee on produced by the Aluminum Co. of America in 1940, National Defense on May 12, 1941, that in May, the reduction plant at Alcoa, Tenn., accounted for 1940, the total demand for aluminum had reached 40 per cent; at Massena, N. Y., for 35 percent; at 30,000,000 pounds per month, and that by the Badin, No. Car., for 14 percent; at Niagara Falls, middle of 1941 the need would be 50,000,000 pounds

for 9 percent; and at Vancouver, Wash., for per month, one-half of which would be used for 2 percent. commenced operations September 23, 1940, con- of aluminum for defense alone had increased from tracted for a total of 162,500 kilowatts of Bonne- 25,000,000 pounds to more than 50.000.000 pounds ville power and was set to produce aluminum at an per month In May, 1940, the original estimates annual rate of 150,000,000 pounds by the summer of the need for aluminum for aviation were 17.of 1941. Ingot production facilities also are being 000,000 pounds, but by May, 1941, the actual conexpanded substantially at Alcoa, and at the other sumption was 27,000,000 pounds for this purpose. reduction plants of the company. Before the end Subsequently the o. P. M. revised the estimates of 1942 the Aluminum Co. of America expects to of the requirements for aluminum to 65,000,000 by producing metal at a rate exceeding 700,000,000 pounds per month by the end of 1942 and 70,000,000 pounds annually. In addition, the Reynolds Metals pounds per month by the spring of 1943.

Cement and Other Quarry Production and Values

Source: United States Bureau of Mines
Year
Cement
Clay Clay prod.

Lime

Sand and Gravel Barrels 1 Dollars Dollars Dollars Short tons Dollars Short tons Dollars 1925. 159,046,937 281,075,691 12.736,632 423,446,917 4,580.823 42,609,141172,001,473 107,542,123 1930 160,846,350231,249,287) 12,521,495 275.134.322 3,387,880 25.616.486 197.051,726 115.176,543 1931 128,377.384 142,579,826 8,353,185177.562,025 2,707,614 18,674.913|153.479,044 86,280,324 1932 81.368.031 82,718,197 5,201,609 89.024,341 1,959,990 12,302,231 120,037,897 57,522,076 1933 64,760,517 86.228,666 6,840,617 94,726.786 2,269.280 14,253,659 107.755,349 53,072,910 1934 76,579,483 117.881,816 8,197,253 116,171.631 2,397,0871 17,164,024 116,611.689) 61,247,173 1935 76.244,328 114,809,724 10,823,923 155,535,623 2,487,133 21,748,655 123,923,923 61,977,379 1936 114,0:0,972 172,777.698 13,423,456 95,136,775 3,749,383 26.933,719 178,329,814 90,307,752 1937 115.678,182 171,414,093 15.708,064 109,011,641 4,124,165 30,091,168 189,660,423 97,472,997 1938 108,192.076 156,703,002 11,775,572 88,798,513 3,346.954 24,137.638 181.320.233 85,922,847 1939 125,056,594 184,254.932 15,354.918 122.528,069 4,254,348 30.049,394 226,008,000 106,066,000 1940 132,864,383 193,464,869 18,162,4851

4.886,929 33,956,385 238,308,000 110,688.000 Figures for clay products exclude pottery and refractories, beginning 1936.

Asphalt from

Asphalt from Year Slate Stone

Asphalt (mine) (domestic petrol.) (foreign petrol.) Dollars Short tons Dollars Short tons Dollars Short tons Dollars Short tonsi Dollars 1925.. 12,575.326 115,851.370 174.216,792 584,850 4,148,400 1,206,700 15,305,760 1,971,670 27,520,010 1930.

7,911,618 126.996,340 178.948.611 702.777 4.663.092 2.167,068 20.851,354 1.986.926 21,181,467 1931.. 5,498,336 97,933,180 135,085,627 503.383 2.930,451 2,206,568 16,614,594 1,867,302 15,191,065 1932 3,104,300 70,644,310 89,063,608 340,019 1,942,943 2,308,725 14,898,492 1,489,302 11.013,000 1933. 2,696,185 70,222,210) 80,945,608 313,135 1,705,310 2.122,458 15,946,191 1,350,89613,885,472 1934. 2,707.928) 92.063.830 198.979,000 440,842 2,365,750 2,515,628 23,413,386 1,506,193 17.224.051 1935. 3,649,515 83,159,050 87.824,497 347.397 2,148,761 2.715,104 24,111,959 1,570,175 15,785,675 1936.. 5,485,208 131,416,420 141.525,979 581.064 3,260,895 3,607,603 31,790,935 1,854,822 19.780.852 1937 5.605,322 133.143,240 146.213.128 485,384 3.019,038 3,844,326 36,670,827 1,655,467 18.506,823 1938. 5,655,313 124,838,940 139.255.046 477,7412.874,803 4,249,226 34,572,918 1.555,954 16,512,851

6,682,214 147,447,130 158,461,515 459,848 3.066.844 4.860.540 36,038,696 1.328,047 13,311,980 1940., 5,738,269 153,733,040 160,044,115 490,665 2,725,337 5,262,959 41,398,735 1,344,965 15,211,410 COPPER, LEAD AND ZINC PRODUCTION IN THE U. S.

Year Year Copper

Lead

Zinc.
(Cal).
Coppor

Lead

Zinc MI $1,000 Short $1.000 Short M

Mil. $1,000 Short $1,000 Short MI,
lbs.
tons
tons dol

lbs.
tong

tons dol. 1922

950 128.289 532.662 58,593 353,274 10 1932 544 34.273 281.941) 16,916 207,148 12 1923. 1.435 210.945 618,322 86,565 508,335 69 1933 450 28.800/263,676 19,512 306.010 26 1924 1,634 214,087 690,493 110,479 515.831 67 1934

488 39,076 311,236 23,031 355,366 31 1925. 1.675 237,832 766,969 133,453 555.631 84 1935 701 63,295 324,560 25,965 412,184 36 1926 1.740 243,547 798.941 127.831 611,991 92 1936 1.223 112,499399.156/ 36.722 491.803 49 1927 1,684 220,609 796,530 100,363 576,960 74 1937 1,669 201.988 467.317 55,143 551,1651 72 1928 1.826 262,930 781,071 90,604 591,525 72 1938 1,125 110.216 383,069 35,298 436,007 42 1929. 2,003 352,504 774,633 97.604 612,136 81 1939 1.425 148,236 484,035 45,499 491,058 51 1930. 1,394 181.271 643,033 64,303 489,361 47 1940 1,818 205,453 533,179 53,318 580,988 74 1931 11.043 94,887/442,764 32,765 291.996 22

1939..

[blocks in formation]

1,000 net

1.000 net Net Tons $1,000 Tons $1,000

Net Tons $1,000 Tons $1,000 1920, 89,598,249 434,252 568,666 2,129,933 1931.. 59,645,652 296,355 382,089 588,895 1921 90,473,451 452,305 415,921 1.199,984 1932. 49,855,221 222,375 309,709 406,677 1922. 54,683,022 273.700 422,268) 1,274,820 || 1933. 49,541,344 206,718 333,630 445.788 1923. 93,339.009 506.781 564,564 1,514,621 1934,, 57, 168,291 244,152 359,368 628,383 1924 87,926,862 377,231 483.686) 1,062,626 | 1935. 52,158,783 210,131 372.373 658,063 1925.. 61,817,149 327,664 520,052 1.060,402 || 1936.. 54,579,535 227,004 439.087 770.955 1926. 84,437,452 474,164 573,366) 1,183,4121937. 51,856,433 197,599 445,531 864,042 1927. 80,095,564 420,942 517,763| 1,029,657 || 1938. 46,099,027 180.600 348.644 678,653 1928 75,348,069 393.638 500.744 933,774 1939. 51,487,377 187,175 393.065 732,534 1929. 73,828,195 385.643 534.988 952,781 1940.

51,484,640 205,490 453,245 1930.. 69,384,837 354,574 467,526 795,483

A small amount of anthracite and semianthra- Although the effect of such improvements is cumucite is mined in parts of Virginia, Arkansas, lative from year to year the rate of decline is Colorado and New Mexico. Exports of anthracite smaller in recent years, as the remaining margin in 1940 totaled 2,668,000 net tons (mostly to of possible increase in fuel efficiency becomes Canada); imports, 135.000 net tons. The average progressively less. number of men employed in 1940 was 91,313; aver- The 1940 United States production of coke, which age weekly wage, $24.95. The world total of is made from coal, was 273,832,410 short tons. anthracite production in 1936 was 113,843,463 Coke is burned as a domestic fuel chiefly under metric tons, of which 64,330,000 tons were mined two regional conditons-in areas where there is a outside the United States. Bituminous (soft) coal surplus production of metallurgical coke, or when is mined in over 30 states. The exports in 1940 the manufacture of large quantities of city gas as were 16,465,928 net tons.

& primary objective result in the yield of corWorld production in 1938 of bituminous coal was respondingly large quantities of coke that also 1,091,156,537 metric tons; lignite, 264,000,000 metric must find a market. The consumption of coke for tons.

domestic heating tends to be localized in regions The potential full-time output of active mines in near centers of production. A majority of the the bituminous-coal industry increased 2 percent coking plants are equipped to screen and size coke between 1938 and 1939. The coal Industry reached for domestic use. its peak capacity in 1923 when (upon the basis of In 1940, byproduct coke sold for furnace use, 308 operating days) the potential output was 970,- including all coke sold to financially afiliated cor. 000,000 tons. Subsequent liquidations forced the porations, totaled 5,134,395 tons-26 percent more closing or abandonment of thousands of mines and than 1939. The sales for other uses and their reduced the indicated capacity to 622,000,000 tons increase over 1939 are as follows: Foundry use, in 1934. The potential output upon a 308-day basis 1,858,664 tons (25 percent): domestic use, 8,131,947 was 676,000,000 tons in 1939. Under the 5-day week, tons (8 percent); and other industrial, including full-time operation is limited to approximately 261 that used in the manufacture of water gas, 1,754,days. The potential capacity of operating mines 917 tons (16 cent). upon a 261-day basis was 573,000,000 tons in 1939 The peak for employment in the Pennsylvania compared with the total actual production of anthracite industry was 1914, when 179.679 men 393,065,000 tons.

were employed. In 1926 the figure had fallen to Since the World War period improvements in 165.386 and declined steadily until 1939, when fuel engineering have contributed to a continuing 93.138 men were on the pay rolls. In 1940 the decline in the market for coal for industrial uses. number employed had fallen to 91.313.

SERIOUS COAL-MINE DISASTERS IN THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1900
Date
Location of Mine Killed

Date

Location of Mine Killed

1900.
May 1 Scofield, Utah.

200 1924. April 28 Benwood, W. Va.. 119 1902. May 19|Coal Creek, Tenn

184
1928. May 19 Mather, Pa.,

195 1902 July 10 Johnstown, Pa. 112 1929. March 21 Parnassus, Pa.

46 1903. June 30 Hanna, Wyo.. 169 1929. Dec. 17 McAlester, Okla.

61 1904.

Jan.
25 Cheswick, Pa.

179 1930.

Oct.
27 McAlester, Okla.

30 1905. Feb. 20 Virginia City, Ala 108 1930. Nov. 5 Millneld, Ohio.

79 1907 Dec. 6 Monongah, W. Va. 361 1931. Jan. 28 Dugger, Ind 1907

Dec.
19 Jacobs Creek, Pa.

239 1932 Feb.

27 Boissevain, Va. 1908 Nov. 28 Marianna, Pa. 154 1932. Dec. 9 Yancey, Ky.

23 1909 Nov. 13 Cherry, Ill. 259 1932. Dec. 23 Moweaqua, nii.

54 1911. April & Littleton, Als. 128 1937 July 15 Sullivan, Ind.

20 1911. April 7 Scranton, Pa. 73 1937 Oct. 15 Birmingham, Ala

34 1913. Oct. 22 Dawson, N. M.

263 1938 April 22 Grundy. Va 1914. April 28 Eccles, W. Va.

181 1939. July 14 Webster County, Ky 28 1915. March 2 Layland, W. Va. 112 1940.. Jan. 10-12 Bartley, W. Va..

91 1917. April 27 Hastings, Col.

121 1940. Mar. 16 Willow Grove, Ohio.. 73 1923. Feb. 8 Dawson. N. M.

120 1940
July 15 Sonman, Pa...

63 1924.....March 8 Castle Gate, Utab. 171 1940. Nov. 29 Cadiz, Ohio.

31 The number of men killed in the United States by accidents in mines, quarries, coke ovens, oredressing plants, smelters, and auxiliary works was 1,690 in 1940; 1,334 in 1939; 1,369 in 1938; 1,759 in 1937; 1.686 in 1936.

The number injured in 1940 was 78,550; 75,495 in 1939; 71,618 in 1938; 96,484 in 1937; 92,644 in 1936.

Coal mines accounted for 1,420 fatalities in 1940; 1,078 in 1939; 1.105 in 1938; 1,413 in 1937; 1,342 in 1936.

Year (Cal.)

1920. 1925. 1926 1927 1928. 1929

COAL-MINE FATALITIES AND PRODUCTION
Em- Men Per

Year Em- Men Per Year
ployed Killed Death (Cal.) ployed Kilted Death (Cal.)
No. NO. Sh.tons

No. No. Sh. tons 784,621 2,272 289,729 1930. 644.006 2,063 260,257 1936. 748,805 2,234 260,461||1931. 589.705 1,463 301,949||1937. 759,033 2,518 261,241|1932. 527.623 1,207 297,9001938. 759,177 2,231 267,978 1933. 523,182 1,064 360,124|1939. 682,831 2,176 264,749||1934. 566.426) 1.226 339,792 1940. 654,494 2,187 278,380 | 1935. 565,202 1,242 341,894

Em

Men Per ployed Killed Death

No. No. Sh.tons 584,582 1,342 365,975 589,856 1,413 353,003 511,528 1.105 358,096 539,375 1,078 415,563 543,200 1,400 359,500 World Production of Crude Petroleum Source: United States Bureau of Mines; figures show millions and tenths of millions of 42-gallon barrels

[blocks in formation]

.

...

12.0

19.7°

1900.
63.6 75.8
1.6
2.2

0.3 1910. 209.61 70.3

9.7
3.6 11.0

1.3 0.i 1915.. 281.1 68.5

3.6 32.9 11.9

0.5 2.6 0.7 1920. 442.91 25.4 7.4 12.2 157.1 17.5

1.6 2.8

2.1 1925, 763.7 52.4

16.6 35.0 115.5 21.4 1.0 6.3 9.2 4.4 1930. 898.0 135.2 136.7 42.8 45.8 39.5

41.7 20.3 9.0 12.5 9.4 1931. 851.1 162.8 116.6 49.1 44.4 33.0 35.5 18.2 11.7

10.1 9.7 1932.. 785.2 154.4 116.5 53.8 49.5 32.8 39.0 16.4 13.1 9.9 10.1 1933.. 905.7154.8 117.7 54.0 54.4 34.0 42.6 13.2

13.3 9.6 1934.. 908.1/174.3 136.1 62.1

57.8 38.2 46.9 17.3 14.0 16.3 10.9 1935... 996.6/182.4 (148.2 61.3 27.4 40.2 47.2 17.6 14.3 17.1 11.7 1936... 1,099.7 186.2 154.8 63.6

30.4 41.0 50.0 18.7 15.4 17.6 13.2 1937. 1,279.2 193.2 186.2 52.4 31.8 46.7 56.7 20.6 16.3

17.4 15.5 1938 1,214.3 204.9 188.2 48.4 32.6 38.3 57.3 21.6 17.1 15.8 17.7 1939. 1.264.9212.5 205.8 45.6 30.8 42.8 62.1 22.0 18.6 13.5 19.3 1940.. 1.351.91212.9 184.8

43.2

25,7 44.1 60.8 26.1 20.5 13.4 20.2 Also 1940–Germany-Austria, 5.3; Hungary, 1.7; Iran (Persia), 78.6; Japan, 2.6.

1.1 6.1 8.2 8.4 8.3 8.9 8.2 8.8 8.7 10.5 2.0 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.3 2.2

13.7

2.3 149.1 12.7 327.8 6.3 432.0 5.6 688.9 6.0 1.068.9 4.9 1,411.9 4.7 1,372.5 4.1 1.309.7 4.1 1.442.1 3.9 1.521.5 3.8 1.654.5 3.8 1.791.5 3.7 12.039.0 3.8 1.987.7 3.9 2.078.8 3.9 2.149.4

Wyo.

CRUDE PETROLEUM PRODUCTION BY CHIEF STATES IN UNITED STATES

(Figures represent thousands of 42-gallon barrels) Year N. Y., Pa. Ohio W.Va. Cal. Ky.

111. Kan. ,Texas Okla.

La. Ark. 1900. 1,301 13,258 22,363 16,196 4.325

62
75 836

6

6 1910,

1.054 8,795 9,916 11,753 73.011 469 33,143 1,128 8.899 52,029 115 6,841 1920.

906 7.438) 7,400 8.249 103,377 8,738 10,744 39,005 96,868 106,206 16,831 35.714 1925.

1.695 8,097 7,212 5.763 232,492 6.759 7.863 38,357 144.648 176,768 29,173 20,272 77.398 1930

3.647 12,803/ 6,486 5,071 227,329 7,389 5,736 41,638 290,457 216,486 17,868 23,272 19,702 1931

3,363 11,892 5,327 4,472 188,830 6,456 5.039 37,018 332,437 180,574 14,834 21,804 14,791 1932.

3,508 12,412 4,644 3.876 178,128 6,287 4.673/34,848 312,478 153,244 13,418/ 21.807 12.051 1933

3,181,12,624 4,235| 3,815 172,010 4 608 4,244 41.976 402,609 182,251 11,227) 26,168 11.686 1934.

3,804 14,478 4,234 4,095 174.305 4.870 4,479 46,482 381.516 180, 107 12,560 32.871 11.182 1935. 4,236 15,830 4,082 3,902 207,832 5,258 4,322 54.787 392,666 185,288 13,755 50,330 11,008 1936.

4.663 17,070 3,847 3,847 214,773 5,633 4,475 58.317 427,411 206,555 14,582 80.491 10.469 1937

5,478 19,189 3,559 3,845 238,521 5,484 7.499 70.761 510,318228,839 19,166 90,924 11.764 1938

5,045 17,426 3,298 3,684 249.749 5,821 24,075 60,064 475,850 174,994 19.022 95,208 18.180 1939

5,098 17.337 3.156 3,580 224,354 5,581 94,302 60.723 484,527 160,072 21,417 93,869 21.143 1940. 4,999 17,353l 3,1691 3,444 223,8815,193146,788166,270 493,1261155,95225,683 103.961125,583

The total value in 1940 at the wells was $1,352,000,000.

U. S. PETROLEUM, GASOLINE, KEROSENE AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION
Petroleum (Domest.) Petr'l'm

Nat, Gas Gasoline Natural Gas Year

Motor Keros'n
Product'o Value FuelPrd.

Product'a Value Product'n Value 1.000 Bols $1,000 1.000 Bbl. 1,000 Bbl 1,000 Gals. $1.000 MII. Cu.Ft $1,000 1920.

442,929 1,360,745 116,251 55,240 384,744 71.788 798,210 196,194 1925

763,743 1,284,960 259.601 59,689 1,127,470 120.383 1,188.571 265 271 1930.

898,011 1,070,200 432,241 49,208 2,210,494 128,160 1,943,421 416,090 1931.

851,081 550.630 436,217 42,446 1.831.918 63.732 1,686,436 392,816 1932.

785.159 680,460 392.623 43,836 1,523,800 49,244 1.555.990 384,632 1933

905,656 608,000 407,932 48,977 1,420,000 54,368 1,555,474 368.540 1934.

908.065 904,816 423,801 53,855 1,535,360 60.523 1.770.721 395,378 1935. 996,596 961,440 468,021 55,813 1,651,986

70.940 1,916,595 429,374 1936.

1.099.687 1,199,820 516.266 56.082 1.796.340 84,572 2.167.802 476.813 1937,

1.279,160 1,513,340 571,727 65.308 2,065,434 97,125 2.407,620 528.354 1938

1,214,355 1,373.060 569,162 64,580 2,156,574 87,266 2,295,502 500,698 1939

1,264,962 1.294,470 611,043 68,521 2,169,300 90,050 2,476,756 534.240 1940 1,351,847 1,352,000 16,359 73,882 2,320,458 70,000

,000 591,509 The 1940 figures are subject to final revision.

Value and Weight of Gold

Anl

Source: Director of the Mint The unit in weighing gold is the troy ounce.

The 400-ounce gold bar is most frequently used ounce of fine gold means an ounce of pure gold. for monetary purposes. It is about 3!2 inches wide, On January 31, 1934, the President proclaimed the 694 inches long, and 134 inches thick. The value of United States gold dollar to be 15 5/21 grains of

such a bar, at $35 per fine ounce, approximates

$14,000. gold, nine-tenths fine, which is equivalent to $35

A 14.1 inch cube of gold weighs a ton, per fine troy ounce; the previous value of gold was

The gold in the United States Treasury, $19,$20.67 per fine ounce, based on the dollar of 25.8

963,090,869, on June 30, 1940, would make a bar grains of gold nine-tenths fine. Weighings are made about 50 feet long, 30 feet wide, and 21 feet thick. in troy ounces and decimals thereof. Jewelers use A Government gold storage vault has been built at the

penny-weight and grain. The troy pound never Fort Knox, Kentucky, and gold was removed there is used. The grain is the same in both troy and from New York and Philadelphia in 1937. avoirdupois measure but the ounce and the pound A quake-and-burglar-proof vauit at San Franare not the same. The troy ounce contains 480 cisco for storage of Government gold was dedicated grains and the troy pound 5.760 grains, there being in May, 1937. It is built on solid rock in a five12 ounces to the pound. The avoirdupois ounce con- story streamlined building. tains 43712 grains and the avoirdupois pound The Government's silver vault has been comcontains 7,700 grains, there being 16 ounces to the pleted at West Point, on the Hudson, and silver pound. The troy ounce is about one-tenth heavier from New York was moved there in 1938 and 1940 than the avoirdupois ounce.

under heavy armed guard.

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