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Population of N. Y. City by Boroughs (Present Area)

Source: Bureau of the Census for Census Years; Dept. of Health estimates, other years)
Year

Manhattan Bronx Brooklyn Richmond Queens Totals 1790 (U. S. Census). 33.131

1,761
4,495
3,835
6,159

49,401 1800

60,515

1,755
5,740
4,564
6,642

79,216 1810

96,373
2,267
8,303
5,347

7,444 119,734 1820

123,706

2,782
11,187
6,135

8,246 152,056 1830

202,589

3,023
20,535
7,082

9,049

242, 278 1840

312,710
5,346 47,613

10,965

14,480 391,114 1850

515,547
8,032 138,882

15,061

18,593 696,115 1860 813.669 23,593 279,122

25,492

32,903 1,174,779 1870 942,292 37,393 419.921

33,029

45,468 1,478,103 1880

1,164,673
51,980 599,495

38.991 1890

56,559 1,911,698 1,441,216 88,908 838,547

51,693

87.050 2,507,414 1900

1,850,093 200,507 1.166,582 67,021 152,999 3,437,202 1910 2,331,542 430.980 1,634,351

85,969 284,041 4,766,883 1915 (State Census) 2.137.747 615,600 1.798,513

98,634 396,727 5,047,221 1916 (City's Est.).. 2,301.208 623,488 1,879,909 105,512 402.347 1917

5,312,464 2,296,322 654,496 1.919,462 108,660 421,403 5.400,343 1918

2,291,436 685,504 1,959,015 111,808 440,459 5,488,222 1919

2,286,550 716,512 1,998,568 114,956 459,515 5,576,101 1920 (U. S. Census). 2,284,103 732,016 2,018.356 116,531 469,042 5,620,048 1920 (City's Est.).. 2.263.839 757,945 2,044,712 118,564 498,707 5,683,765 1921

2.223,193 809,944 2,097,570 122,642 558.200 5,811,549 1922

2,182,549 861,943 2,150,428 126.720 617,693 1923

5,939,333 2,141,905 913,942 2.203.286 130,798 677.186 6,067,117 1924

2,101,150 966,084 2,256,289 134,887 736,841 6,195,251 1925

2,060,506 1,018,083 2,309,147 138,965 796,334 6,323,035 1926

2,019,862 1,070,082 2,362,005 143,043 855,827 6,450,819 1927

1,979,218 1, 122,081 2,414,863 147,121 915,320 6,578,603 1928

1,938,463 1,174,223 2,467,866 151,210 974,975 6,706,737 1929

1,897,819 1,226,222 2,520,724 155.288 1,034,468 6,834,521 1930 (U. S. Census) 1.867,312 1.265,258 2.560,401 158,346 1.079, 129 6,930,446 1930 (City's Est.) 1,859,590 1,275,134 2,570,440 159, 120 1,090,428 6,954,712 1931

1,834,629 1,307,070 2,602,903 161,625 1,126,966 7,033,193 1932

1,813,604 1,333,972 2,630,249 163,734 1,157,745 7,099,304 1933

1,794.162 1,358,847 2.655,535 165,685 1.186.205 7,160,434 1934

1,773,256 1,385,595 2,682,724 167,782 1,216,807 7,226,164 1935

1.751,394 1,413,563 2,711,155 169,976 1.248,806 7,294,894 1936

1,729,533 1,441,532 2.739,585 172.169 1,280.805 7,363,624 1937

1,707,038 1,470,311 2,768,839 174,426 1.313.732 7,434,346 1938

1,688,769 1.493.686 2,792,600 176.259 1,340,476 7,491,790 1939

1,662,195 1,527.685 2.827,160 178.925 1,379,374 7,575,339 1940 (U. S. Census). 1,889,924 1,394,711 2,698,285 174,441 1940 (City's est.)..

1,297,634 7,454,995 1.639.000 1,558,000 2,857.000 181,000 1,414,000 7,649,000

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Population and Dwellings, N. Y. City Metropolitan Area

Source: United States Bureau of the Census

Dwelling units, 1940 1940 1930 1920

Total Occupied Whole District

11.690,520 10,901,424 8,505,404 3,425,480 3,160,945 In Connecticut

152,016 138,303 98,012 40.774 38,528 In New Jersey

2,982,854 2,915,056 2,254,319 846,054 799, 229 In New Jersey cities

980,501 1,012,154 944,285 270,980 258,608 Elizabeth

109,912 114,589 95,783 29,350 27,987 Jersey City

301,173 316,715 298,103 84,822 79,701 Newark.

429,760 442,337 414,524 116,810 112,228 Paterson

139,656 138,513 135,875 39,998 38,692 In New York

8,707,666 7,848,065 6.153,073 2,579,426 2,371,717 In New York cities

7,597,593 7,065,092 5,720,224 2,259,352 2,086,555 New York City

7,454,995 6,930,446 5,620,048 2,218,608 2,048,027 Yonkers..

142,598 134,646 100, 176 40,774 38,528 The area (square miles) in 1930 of the districts named above was--whole district (2,514.11); in Connecticut (145.06); in New Jersey (1,159.84; in New Jersey Cities (54.36); Elizabeth (9.73; Jersey City (13.00): Newark (23.57): Paterson (8.06); in New York State (1,209.21); in New York Cities (319.13) New York City (308.86); Yonkers (20.13).

DWELLINGS IN COUNTIES IN AND AROUND NEW YORK CITY, 1940 The dwelling units in the boroughs of New York New York State-Nassau, 406,748; Rockland. City (including occupied in parenthesis) as of April 74,261; Suffolk, 56,065; Westchester, 563,581. 1, 1940, were_ Bronx, 395,366 (377,947); Brooklyn, Connecticut-Fairfield, 152,016. 762,764 (717,121); Manhattan, 617,433 (548,383); New Jersey-Bergen, 409,646; Essex, 837,340; Queens, 394,214 (361,517); Richmond, 48,831 (43,059) Hudson, 652,090; Middlesex, 211,681; Monmouth,

The dwelling units in the counties or parts of 126,572; Morris, 89,305; Passaic, 305,875; Somerset. counties outside New York City, included in the 22,051; Union, 328,344. Metropolitan district, were:

Note by the Bureau of the Census-The general New York State-Nassau, 123,506 (108,099); Rock- plan for the metropolitan districts that have been land, 18,855 (16,484); Suffolk, 20,001 (14,546); set up for use in the 1940 Census is to include in Westchester, 156,602 (145,157).

the district, in addition to the central city or cities, Connectleut-Fairfield, 41,854 (39, 404).

all adjacent and contiguous minor civil divisions New Jersey-Bergen, 115,735 (110,493); Essex, having a population of 150 or more per square mile. 231,069 (221,807); Hudson, 184,156 (113,454);

Mid- The metropolitan district is thus not a political dlesex, 54,451 (52,621); Monmouth, 43,347 (35,033); unit but rather an area including all the thickly Morris, 26,101 (22,021); Passaic, 86,640 (83.007): settled territory in and around a city or group of Somerset, 04 (5,923); Union, 88,451 (84,864). cities. It tends to be a more or less integrated area

The population of the counties or parts of with common economic, social, and, often, adcounties outside New York City, named above, was: ministrative interests.

The number of occupied dwelling units represents approximately the number of private households in the respective areas and may be compared roughly with the number of private families shown in the Census Reports for 1930.

The average size of family in New York has decreased considerably since 1930, as it has throughout the country. The average number of persons in the population per occupied dwelling unit in 1948 was 3.68 for the State as compared with an average population per family of 3.99 in 1930.

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Population of New York City by Assembly Districts, 1930, 1940

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76,780

83,677

Tot.
81,566

90,764
City
6,930,446

7,464,995 Tot.

158, 346

174,441
The state census of 1925 gave the city 5,873,356; 1,123,026 allens, and 4,750,330 citizens.

NEW YORK CITY POPULATION BY HEALTH CENTER DISTRICTS, 1940
Districts
Districts

Districts
Manhattan:

Westchester

197,814 Queens: Central Harlem.. 209,699 Miscellaneous

3,265 Astoria-L. I. City

246,075 East Harlem 204,192

Corona

177.591 Kips Bay-Yorkville 244.876 Bronx..

1,394,711 Flushing

174,510 Lower East Side...

291,016
Brooklyn:

Jamaica-East

224,980 Lower West Side,

281.534
Bay Ridge.

311.952
Jarnaica-West.

255.796 Riverside

332,124
Bedford

301.118
Maspeth.

218,682 Washington Heights 308,485

Brownsville

296,930

Miscellaneous
Miscellaneous*

17,998
Bushwick

240,220
Flatbush..

438,097
Queens

1,297,634 Manhattan..

1.889.924
Fort Greene.

207.923 Richmond:
Gravesend
262,296 St. George

129,352 Bronx: Red Hook Gowanus 176,173 Tottenville.

45,089 Fordham-Riverdale. 216,5061 Sunset Park.

231,4131 Miscellaneous* Morrisanis.

302,772 Williamsburg Greenp't 232,163 Mott Haven. 230.036 Miscellaneous*

Richmond.

174,441 Pelham Bay

130.067 Tremont. 314.2511 Brooklyn

2,698,285 City of New York .. .17,454,995 *Includes parks, islands, boats, etc. POPULATION OF NEW YORK CITY, 1940. AGE, SEX, COLOR (PRELIMINARY) Non

NonTotal White white

Total White white

Males, all ages. 0- 4. 5- 9 10-13. 14-19 20-24. 25-44. 45-64. 65 and over..

3,686,034 3,462,587

225,440 209.766 242.589 224,399 223,266 208,850 358,723 339,087 301.156 285,498 1,313,584 1.218,507 834,395 795,199 186,881 181.281)

223,447 Females, all ages.
15,674 0- 4.
18,190
14,416|10-13
19,63614-19
15.658 || 20-24
95,077 25-44
39,196 45-64
5,600) 65 and over.

3,768,961 3,514,062

216,544 200,371 232,798 215,764 221.986 206,590 363,179 339.963 347,414 319,980 1,375,510 1,265,337) 786,450 748,557 225,080 217,500)

254.899 16.173 17.034 15,396 23,216 27,434 110,173 37.893 7,680

Births, Marriages and Deaths, New York City (Five Boroughs)

Source: Registrar of Records, Department of Health

Live Births Marriages Deaths Stillbirths Infant Mortality Year Estimated

per
per
per

Deaths per 1.000 (Cal.) Pop. July 1 No. 1,000 No. 1.000 No. 1,000

No. 1.000 Under livepop. . pop. pop.

live- 1 Yr. births births

per

9.5

1920. 5,683,765 132.856 23.37 64,422 11.33

73,249 12.89 6.234 46.9 11,340 85 36 1925 6.323 035 128.790 20.37 64,826 10.25 71,864 11.37

6.134 47.6

8,315 64.56 1930. 6,944.000 122,811 17.7 63,337 9.10 74,888 10.76 5,700 46.4 7,030

57.24 1931. 6.995.000 115,621 16.5 61,574 8.8 77,418 11.1 5,579 .48.3 6,427 55.59 1932. 7,047.000 109.878 15.6 58,957

8.4
74,319

10.5

5,396 49.1 5,594 50.91 1933. 7,101,000 103.500 14.6 60,116 8.5 75,153 10.6 5,347 51.7 6,508 53.20 1934. 7.153.000 101,239 14.2 67,347 9.4 75,857 10.6

5,070 50.1 6,287 62.22 1935. 7,206,000 100,657 14.0 68,372

75,057

10.4

4,902 48.7 4,790 47.60 1936. 7,258,000 98.507 13.6 72,234 10.0 77,638 10.7 4,992 50.7 4,490 45.05 1937. 7.311,000 101.988 13.9 69,417 9.5 77,465 10.6

4,847 47.5

4,457 43.7 1938 7,363,000 102,045 13.9 63,493 8.6 73.775 10.0 4,995 48.9 3,910 38.3 1939. 7,415,000 102,261 13.8 62.288 8.4 75,439 10.2 6,831 68.8 3,793 37.1 1940 7.468.000 107.287 14.4 78,487 10.5' 76,008 10.2 7.986 74.4 3,749 34.9 Included in the live births in 1940 were 2,138 twins (individuals).

BROOKLYN BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS (Figures are included in the table above. In this and the following table the figures have been officially revised as to births, deaths and still births to conform to borough of residence 1927 and since.)

Deaths
Live- Still Mar- All
Year

births births riages Causes Tuberc's Pneum. Kidney Cancer Nervous, 1920 49,171 2.193 18,242 25,552 1.959 3,317 2,099 1,731

776 1925

51,406 2,321 18,386 24.889 1.398 2,916 1.642 2,271 912 1930

48,281 2,204 17,909 26.886 1.252 2,814 1.068 2.778 732 1931.

45, 117 2,084 17.753 27,047 1,344 3,349 1,004 2,817 540 1932. 42,565 2,004 18,323 26,126 1,245 3,031

914 2,891 719 1933

40,441 2,101 18,811 26.401 1.248 2.818 1,275 3,041 773 1934

39,312
1.980 21,460 26,113 1,205 2,392 1,816 3,150

730 1935.

38,578 1,852 21,828 26.085 1,216 2,164 1.602 3,413 1.943 1936

37.614 1,971 22,420 26,601 1.269 2,219 1,587 3,490 1.935 1937.

38,964 1.847 21,814 26,516 1,170 2,214 1,465 3,438 1.811 1938

38.627 1,924 22.057 25,492 1,074 1.661 1,358 2,602 1,599 1939

38,832 2,466

22,743 25,933 1,054 1,482 1.230 3,803 1.748 1940

40.364 2,601 29,071 26,207 1,079 1,140 1,307 4,047 1,519 BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS, OTHER BOROUGHS (included in 5-Borough table) Manhattan

Bron

Queens

Richmond Births M'r'g's Deaths Births M'r'g's Deaths Births M'r'g's Deaths Births M'r'g's Deaths 1920 56.839 36,496) 32,557 14,591 6,076 7.895 9.485 2,728 5,530 2,770

880 1,715 1925 47.208 34,544 29,524 15,728 7.749 8,622 11,480 3,227 7.143 2.968 920 1.686 1930 30,227] 30.948 26,608 22.691 9,722 10,865 18,797 3.787 9,701 2,815 971'

1.828 1931 28,242 29,154 26,809 21,597| 9,422 11,415 17.980 4,242 10,323 2,695 1,003 1824 1932 27,0701 26,465 24,975 19,985 8,921 11,265 17,578 4,612 10,159 2,6801 836 1,794 1933 25,7471 26,302 25,197

18,491 9,421 11.531 16,222) 4,727 10,243 2,599 855 1,781 1934 24,502 29,575 25,834 18.667 9 730 11,541 16,252 5.550 10,583 2,506 1.0361,786 1935 24,729 28.957 24.930 18,805 10,981 11.723 16,082 5,623 10,549 2,463 983 1.770 1936 24,009 31,528 25,756 18,640 11,067 12,156 15,905 6,087 11,235 2,339 1,132 1,890 1937 24,550 29,441 25.228 19.154 10,727 12,410 16,824 6,275 11,343 2,496 1,160 1.968 1938 24,293 21.642 23.269 18,941 10.7851 11.983 17.726 8,039 11,266 2,458 970 1,765 1939 23,932 18,613 23.773 18,965 11.121 12,346 18.116 8,655 11,498 2,416 1,156 1,889 1940: 24,664 22,945 23,725 19,609 14,275 12,403 20,137 10,7641 11,704 2,513

1,450

1,969 Deaths in 1940 from street accidents 962, of which 896 were auto fatalities; suicides numbered 1,263.

Yr.

970

DEATHS, CHIEF CAUSES, (GREATER) CITY OF NEW YORK
Non-
Kid- Heart

Non

Kid - Heart Year Pulm. Pneu - Pul'ry Can- ney

Dig- Year Pulm. Pneu. Pul'ry Can. ney DisTuber monia Tuber cer Dis.

ease

Tuber monia Tuber cer Dis. ease 1920.. 6,165 10.058 5,317 4,833 11,342|1935. 3,968 6,385 403

9.969 4,141) 20,175 1925. 4,776 8,397 699 6,784 3,912 14.992|1936. 4,169 6,549 415 10,501 4,041 22,868 1930. 4,457 8,058 632 8.125 2,905 16.953 1937. 3,931

6,504 333 10.714 3,847 23,527 1931 4,3701 9,245 552 8,336 2,806 18,784|1938 3,481 4,737 352 11.160 3,589 23.983 1932 3,997 7,827 543 8,573 2.972 18.893|1939. 3,494 4,234 320 11,597 3,353 25,320 1933. 4,056 7.686

521 8,932 3,638 18,671 | 1940... 3,323 3,410 304 12,310 3,545 26,529 1934 3.9501 6.755 470 9.5021 4,484 20.727

Typhoid deaths--(1933) 70; (1934) 44; (1935) 34; (1936) 33; (1937) 26; (1938) 26; (1939) 22; (1940) 12.

Diphtheria deaths-(1933) 86; (1934) 103; (1935) 68; (1936) 35; (1937) 58; (1938) 26; (1939) 22; (1940) 10.

Epidemic meningitis deaths (1934) 73; (1935) 243; (1936) 226; (1937) 101; (1938) 53; (1939) 27; (1940) 17 Poliomyelitis deaths-(1934) 12; (1935) 91; (1936) 9; (1937) 21; (1938) 4; (1939) 18; (1940) 5.

Appendicitis deaths -(1934) 1,006; (1935) 920; (1936) 1,050; (1937) 935; (1938) 825; (1939) 800; (1940) 677.

Influenza deaths-(1933) 8; (1934) 21: (1935) 11; (1936) 25: (1937) 468; (1938) 162; (1939) 200; (1940) 128.

DEATHS FROM ALCOHOLISM IN NEW YORK CITY
Man The Brook) Tot.
Man - The Brook Tot.

Man - The Brook Tot. Yr.hata Bronx lyn City Yr. hat'n Bronx lyn City Yr. hat'n Bronx lyo City 1905 396 40 135 596 1931 573 56 261 942 1937 225 21 106 385 1910 409 28 143 621 1932

39

701
1938 196

77 316 1915 393 43 91 562 1933 421 40 198 703 1939 200 21

80 343 1920 72 5

16 98 1934

290
26 110 471 1940 209 18

81 345 1925 483 46

682 19:5

255 20 124 433 1930 531 49 277 908 19361 261 21 122 445

417

202

19

123

The New York Public Library

Source: An Omcial of the Institution The Central Building of the Library, Fifth Avenue Columbia Univ. Library; 9 W. 124th St.; 224 E. and 42d Street, built by the city, was opened May 125th St.; 518 W. 125th St.; 103 W. 135th St.; 503 23, 1911; cost, $9,000,000.

W. 145th St.; 1000 St. Nicholas Ave., cor. 160th The branch library buildings usually contain St.; 535 W. 179th St.; 215 Sherman Ave., near

207th St. lending and reference departments for adults,

Richmond-14 Bay Street, St. George; 75 Bennett similar departments for children, lecture rooms used for meetings for educational purposes and for

St., Port Richmond: 976 Castleton Ave., W. New

Brighton; 132 Canal St., Stapleton; 7430 Amboy organizations for social betterment. The branch

Rd., Tottenville; 56 Giffords Lane, Great Kills; 155 libraries work in concert with the schools and pay

Third St., New Dorp (Hughes Memorial Library). special attention to the Americanization of foreignborn citizens. In addition to the branches there

The Bronx---321 E. 140th St.; 761 E. 160th St.;

877 Southern Blvd., 910 Morris Ave., cor. 162d are the Municipal Reference Library, Library for the Blind, Bronx Reference Center, Music Library,

St.; 78 W. 168th St. 610 E. 169th St., 1205 Harrod

Ave. (Clason's Pt.); 1866 Washington Ave., cor. and Picture Collection (lending). The Reference Department, in the Central

176th St., 2019 University Ave., 879 E. 180th St.;

707 Rhinelander Ave.; 2556 Bainbridge Ave., 3041 Building and the Annex at 137 W. 25th St., in

Kingsbridge Ave., near 230th St.; 325 City Island addition to their main reading rooms, have special rooms devoted to art and prints, American history,

Ave. ; 4100 Lowerre Place; 4304 Katonah Ave.; 1400

Dolen Park. maps, manuscripts, music, genealogy, Slavonic literature, Jewish literature, Oriental literature,

Hours, Central Building: 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.; 1 to economic and public documents, periodicals, science,

10 P.M. Sundays. Branches: 9 AM to 9 P.M. technology, and newspapers.

As of Dec. 31, 1940, the Library contained 2,158,There are three exhibition rooms, and two gal- 062 books and pamphlets in the Reference Departleries which are devoted to the Lenox and Stuart ment, and 1,498,439 in the Circulation Department art collections, with portraits of Washington, by and the Municipal Reference Library; a total of Gilbert Stuart, paintings by Reynolds, Raeburn, 4,256,501. The Reference readers in 1940 numbered Copley, Turner, etc. The Avery collection of prints 2,011,014 and they consulted 4.338,142 volumes; is notable.

Circulation books borrowed totaled 11,237,770; per

sons entering the main ibrary numbered 3.910.742. CIRCULATION BRANCHES

The assets, as of Dec. 31, 1940 were valued at Manhattan-33 E. Broadway; 192 E. Broadway; $43,537,667; expenditures in 1940 were $3,199,653. 61 Rivington St.; 388 E. Houston St.; 10 Seventh Reading in the New York Public Library in Ave., South; 135 2d Ave., near 8th St.; 331 E. 10th 1940-41 was influenced by the World War. There St.; 251 W. 13th St.; 228 E. 23d St., 209 W. 230 was a demand for facts and books related to the St., 137 W. 25th St. (Library for the Blind); 348 War in the fields of geography, history, biography E. 32nd St.; 457 W. 40th St., 564 Lexington Ave.; and technology. Latin-American relations, trade, 742 10th Ave., near 51st St.; 121 E. 58th St.; 328 travel, language and literature were also studied. E, 67th St.; 190 Amsterdam Ave., near 69th St. Percentages for the most heavily used classes in

1465 York Ave., near 78th St.; 222 E. 79th St.: the main stack collection (not including the special 444 Amsterdam Ave., near 81st St., 112 E. 96th St. reading rooms) were-Economics and sociology, 206 W. 100th St.; 174 E. 110th St.; 203 W. 115th 21.88; literature (American and foreign) 14.62 St.; 116th st. and Amsterdam Ave., room 108a; I history, 9.91; technology, 8.13.

OTHER LIBRARIES IN MANHATTAN American Geographical Society, Broadway and W. Lawyers', 2 Rector St.- Open 9 A. M. to 5:30 P. M. 156th St.-Open from 10 A. M. to 5 P. M.

Masonic, 50 W, 24th St.- Open 7 to 10:30 P. M. American Museum of Natural History, Central Mechanics and Tradesmen's Soc., 20 W. 44th St. Park West and 77th St.

Mercantile, 17 E. 47th St., 149 Broadway-8:30 American Numismatic Society, W. 156th St. and A. M. to 6 P. M. Broadway.

Methodist, 150 Fifth Ave.-9A. M. to 5 P. M. British Library of Information, 50 Rockefeller Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Ave, and 82d Plaza.

St.--Open daily, 10 A. M. to 5 P. M. Columbia Univ., W. 116th St. and Amsterdam Ave. Morgan, J. Pierpont, Library, 33 E, 36th St. Cooper Union, Fourth Ave. and 7th St.-Open 8 New York Society, 53 E. 79th St.--Open 9 A. M. A. M. to 10 P. M.

to 6 P. M. French Institute, 22 E. 60th St.

New York University, Washington Square: UniverFrick Art Reference, 6 E. 71st St. Admittance by sity Heights. appointment to students of art.

Russell Sage Foundation Library, 130 E. 22d st. Friends (Quakerania), 221 E. 15th St.-Open Seamen's, 25 South St.-Open 10 A. M. to 10 P. M. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays.

Union Th. Sem., Broadway, cor. 120th St.- Open Genealogical and Biographical, 122 E. 58th St.- 8:45 A. M. to 5 P. M. Closed Aug. 15 to Sept. 15.

Open 9:30 A. M. to 5 P. M.; closed on Sundays. United Engineering Society, 29 W 39th St.- Open Grolier, 47 W. 60th St.

daily except Sunday, 9 A. M. to 9 P. M. Hispanic Society, W. 156th St., near Broadway.

Young Men's Christian Ass'n-At branchesHistorical Society, 170 Central Park West-9 A. M. Open 9 A. M. to 10 P. M.; Sundays, 2 to 10 P. M. to 6 P. M., except August and holidays.

Young Men's Hebrew Ass'n, Lex. Ave. at 92d St. Huntington Free, 7 Westchester Sq., Bronx.

Young Women's Christian Ass'n-At branches Law Library, 42 W. 44th St.

Open 9 A. M. to 9:15 P. M., Sundays excepted.

The Queens Borough Public Library The Administration headquarters are in the Blvd.; Broadway, 32-43 Steinway Ave., L. I. City: Central Building, 89-14 Parsons Blvd., Jamaica, Corona, 41-08 102nd St.; Elmhurst, 8601 Broad, which was built from funds appropriated by the way; Far Rockaway, 1637 Far Rockaway Blvd.: City and opened to the public April 1, 1930. The Flushing, 4125 Main St., Glendale, 78-60 73rd Central Building houses the Central Circulation, Place; Hollis, 190-32 Jamaica Ave., Jackson Central Children's Room, General Reference De Heights, 76-08 37 Ave., Maspeth, 71-10 Grand partment and special rooms devoted to Long Island St., McGoldrick, 161-26 Northern Blvd., Flushing: history and genealogy, art and music, business, Middle Village, 7517 Metropolitan Ave.; Morris science and technology, periodicals, and education. Park, 111-16 Liberty Ave., Richmond Hill; North

There are 27 branch libraries giving reference ern Blvd., 98-18 Astoria Blvd., E. Elmhurst; Ozone as well as leading service, 18 community stations, Park, 9511 101 Ave.; Poppenhusen, 121-23 14 Ave., 14 libraries in elementary schools, a book bus and College Point: Queens Village, 214-61 Jamaica Ave.. 132 other agencies for the distribution of books. Richmond Hill, 118-14 Hillside Ave., Ridgewood,

In 1940 the library had 734,109 volumes, 422,454 2012 Madison St.; St. Albans, 187-10 Linden Blvd.; registered borrowers, and circulated 4,388,600 vol

Seaside, 206 Beach 91 St., Rockaway Beach; Stein. umes for home use. The City appropriation for way, 2161 31 St., L. I. City; Sunnyside, 45-60 its maintenance for 1940-41 was $724,622.

47th St., L. I. City: Whitestone, 14-16 150th St.; The library has no private endowments.

Woodhaven, 8541 Forest Parkway; Woodside, Chief Librarian, Louis J. Bailey.

54-22 Skillman Ave. CIRCULATION BRANCHES

Hours: Most branches open week days 9 A. M. Astoria, 1401 Astoria Blvd.; Bayside, 39-26 Bell to 9 P. M.

Brooklyn Public Library

Source: An Official of the Library The Library has a Central Building, 35 branches. Brown; Chief Librarian. Milton James Ferguson. four deposit stations, and more than 500 agencies Circulation Branches Bay Ridge, 73d st. and for the distribution of books in schools, hospitals, Ridge Boulevard; Bedford, Franklin Ave. at Hanpolice and fire stations, factories, etc.

cock St.; Borough Park, 5211 13th Ave., BrownsAdministration headquarters are in the Central Ville, Glenmore Ave. and Watkins st.; Brownsville

Children's, Stone and Dumont Aves.; Bushwick. Building (Ingersoll Memorial), Grand Army Plaza, Bushwick 'Ave. and Seigel st. Brooklyn. Opened to the public in February, 1940, Canarsie, 1064 E. 95th St.; Carroll Park, Clinton this building, built by the City at a cost to date of and Union Sts., Central Children's, Grand Army $5,000,000, is not yet completed. It houses the Plaza, Central Circulation, Grand Army Plaza: Cataloging, Book Order, Central Registration, City Park. St. Edwards St. and Auburn Pl.; Coney Central Circulation, and Library Extension De- Island, 2880 Stillwell Ave., Crown Heights, 401 partments. Special collections, such as Art and Rogers Ave., DeKalb, Bushwick and DeKalb Aves. Music, Science and Industry, are maintained. There East Arlington Ave. and Warwick St., Eastern are separate Children's and Young People's Rooms. Parkway. Eastern Parkway and Schenectady Ave. Both circulation and reference service, including Extension Dept., Grand Army Plaza: Flatbush. readers' advisory service, is offered to adults. Linden Blvd. and Flatbush Ave.

Twenty-one of the 35 branches are housed in Fort Hamilton, 4th Ave. and 95th St.; Gerrittsen buildings erected by Carnegie Funds; 12 are in Beach, 2752 Gerrittsen Ave., Greenpoint, Norman temporary quarters. All branches have reference Ave. and Leonard St.; Irving, Irving Ave. and service; in addition, special reference work, aimed Woodbine st.; Kensington, 771 McDonald Ave.: to assist businessmen, is done in the Montague Kings Highway branch, 1653 E. 14th St., Leonard, Branch.

Devoe and Leonard Sts.; Macon, Lewis Ave. and The Library has a total collection of approxi- Macon St. mately 1.200.000 volumes. Notable are the collection Mapleton, 6107 18th Ave.; Midwood, 984 E. 12th of music books and scores, books on costumes, chess St.; Montague, 197 Montague St.; New Utrecht, and checker collection, Civil War and World War 8402 18th Ave.; Pacific, 4th Ave. and Pacific St. libraries, and Old Juvenile collection.

Prospect, 6th Ave. and 9th St., Red Hook, The circulation of books for home use in 1940 lic

and Visitation Pl.; Saratoga, Hoptotaled 6,772,789 volumes. The Library in 1941 had kinson Ave. and Macon St.; Sheepshead Bay, 1802 approximately 578,000 borrowers.

Jerome Ave., South, 4th Ave. and 51st St.; The Library's special services include supplying Tompkins Park, Marcy and Greene Aves.: Wil. of classroom book collections, instruction of classes liamsburgh, Division and Marcy Aves. in the use of the library, story-telling. sponsorship Hours: Most branches open week days 9 A.M. to of young people's clubs, exhibition of materials 9 P.M., Saturday 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., and on legal from outside, maintenance of picture loan col- holidays from 2 to 6 P.M.; Central Building open lections. Cooperation with the national defense on week days 2 to 9 P.M., Saturdays 9 AM to 1 program was a feature in 1941 (see Congressional P.M., on holidays 2 to 6 P.M.; Montague Branch Record, April 22. 1941).

open week days_9 A.M. to 9 P.M., Sundays and President of the Board of Trustees, Roscoe C. E. / holidays 2 to 6 P.M.

The Public School System

Source: An Official of the Department
Public, tax-supported, elementary, junior high, of increase has been removed.

In the second place the declining birth rate in senior high and vocational high schools in the City

New York City has materially reduced the size of of New York are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Education, the new headquarters of the entering classes.

The vocational group was the only one that which are located at 110 Livingston Street, Brook- showed an increase over the previous year. lyn.

The increase in the average daily register in the The Board of Education consists of 7 members, vocational group amounted to nearly 5 per cent. appointed by the Mayor for terms of 7 years-two The elementary group suffered the greatest loss members from Manhattan, two from Brooklyn, in average daily register, the decrease being more and one from each of the other boroughs. The than 434 per cent. The loss in the high school members are paid no salary.

group amounted to slightly more than 4 per cent, The Superintendent of Schools is the chief execu- while in the junior high group the loss was tive officer of the Board of Education and of the approximately 3 per cent. educational system.

The Board of Higher Education headquarters, The gradual decline in the amount and rate of 695 Park Avenue, Manhattan, consists of the register increase has resulted from the influence of president of the Board of Education and 21 citizens a number of factors.

who are residents appointed by the Mayor, for a In the earlier years immigration was one source term of 3 years each. This board looks after the which accounted for the large growth in register. College of the City of New York, Brooklyn ColThrough restriction of immigration this source lege, Hunter College and Queens College.

EDUCATION STATISTICS, NEW YORK CITY
School year
Average Average Numbered

Expenses of ending in

Daily

Daily School Organi- Instruction Day Teaching
June

Register Attendance Buildings zations School Salaries Positions
No.
No.
No.
No.
Dollars

No. 1918. 788,024 699,695

547

33,486,851.36 22.748 1919. 815.010 712 245

551
509

35,414.517.51 23,034 1920. 829,573 735,654

553
508

40.812,256.72 23,556 1921. 861.751 779,031

557
511

66.704,267.05 24,235 1922.

902,872
814,038

564
521

69,733,108.44 25,199 1923. 925,756 853,490

585
539

72,867,272,55 26.442 1924 946,815 870.682

605
555

76,341,431.83 27.637 1925. 964,804 890.939

623
570

78.980,357.21 28,563 1926. 981,436 909,096 649

587

82,607,391.66 29,570 1927 996,343 925.664

651
597

86,007,088.81 30,685 1928. 1,014,605 939,591

661
613

98,991.408.45 31,133 1929. 1,028,464 947.987

665

624

104,440,337,45 31,849 1930 1,043, 454, 973,562

683

647

108,727,208.37 32,476 1931. 1.064.565 982,240 700

676

112,295, 110.61 33,459 1932. 1,082,765 1.001,394 711

693

115,243,059.72 34.367 1933. 1.099,263 1,017,808

702

681

112,921,335,20 33,818 1934. 1.104,672 1,022,810

702

682

107,951,009.33 33,729 1935. 1,107,915 1,018,154

698

679

107,743,789.81 33,769 1936 1.121.084 1,030,818

697

112,961,882.07 34,133 1937 1,116,266 1,023,165 716

700

115,604.344.89 35,441 1938. 1,103,463 1,015,220

719

704

125,517.322.38 35,848 1939. 1.093,683 993, 152

732

716 117.610.610.97 35,894 1940. 1.069,465 968.143

733

716

126,680.805.26 34.962 1941. 1,029.019 933,491

732

717

126.004,314.28 34,789

505

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