History of the War in the Peninsula: And in the South of France, from the Year 1807 to the Year 1814, Band 2

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T. and W. Boone, 1851
 

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Seite 489 - But it appears that the government have lately discovered that we are all wrong; they have become impatient for the defeat of the enemy, and, in imitation of the central junta, call out for a battle and early success. If I had had the power I would have prevented the Spanish armies from attending to this call ; and if I had, the cause would now have been safe...
Seite 414 - The shouts of the British now rose loudly, but they were confidently answered, and, in half an hour, a second column, more numerous than the first, again crowded the bridge. This time, however, the range was better judged, and ere half the distance was...
Seite 490 - Lisbon, and for the food of the army, and of the people, while the troops shall be engaged with the enemy. ' As for Principal Souza, I beg you to tell him, from me, that I have had no satisfaction in transacting the business of this country, since he has been a member of the Government ; that being embarked in a course of military operations, of which I hope to see the successful termination, I shall continue to carry them on to...
Seite 122 - French army, if the emperor, journeying day and night, had not arrived at the very hour when his lieutenant was on the point of consummating the ruin of the army. But then was seen the supernatural force of Napoleon's genius. In a few hours he changed the aspect of affairs, and in a few days, maugre their immense number, his enemies, baffled and flying in all directions, proclaimed his mastery in an art which, up to that moment, was imperfect ; for never, since troops first trod a field of battle,...
Seite 489 - I am not insensible to the value of their confidence as well as that of the public; as, also, that I am highly interested in removing the anxiety of the public upon the late misfortune; but I should forget my duty to my sovereign, to the prince regent, and to the cause in general, if I should permit public clamour or panic to induce me to change, in the smallest degree, the system and plan of operations which I have adopted, after mature consideration, and which daily experience shows to be the only...
Seite 175 - Mackenzie's brigade and by two Spanish battalions, withstood their utmost efforts. The English regiments, putting the French skirmishers aside, met the advancing columns with loud shouts, and breaking in on their front, and lapping their flanks with fire, and giving no respite, pushed them back with a terrible carnage.
Seite 179 - Indignant at this shameful scene, the troops hastened, rather than slackened, the impetuosity of their pace, and leaving only seventeen stragglers behind, in twenty-six hours crossed the field of battle in a close and compact body ; having in that time passed over sixty-two English miles, and in the hottest season of the year, each man carrying from fifty to sixty pounds weight upon his shoulders. Had the historian Gibbon known of such a march, he would have spared his sneer about the "delicacy of...
Seite 416 - ... to the Duke of Wellington displays ignorance of the men and of the art they professed. If they had even comprehended the profound military and political combinations he was then conducting, the one would have carefully avoided fighting on the Coa, and the other, far from refusing, would have eagerly proffered his support.
Seite 498 - Patriarch, in recent discussions at the meetings of the Regency. ' It appears that his Eminence has expatiated on the inutility of laying fresh burthens on the people, " which were evidently for no other purpose than to nourish a war in the heart of the kingdom.

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