A Digest of International Law: As Embodied in Diplomatic Discussions, Treaties and Other International Agreements, International Awards, the Decisions of Municipal Courts, and the Writings of Jurists ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906
 

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Inhalt

VI
24
1 Ownership and transfer
26
The State and its government
40
Nature and functions 492
41
Rome and the Papal States
45
Penalty 1263
49
Confederate and State governments
54
Confederate debts and obligations
60
Enforced labor in case of persons accused 1014
64
CHAPTER III
67
Recognition of new StatesContinued
68
Recognition of belligerencyContinued
70
The Confederate States
71
Acts of insurgents
73
H Doc 551III
81
Argentine Republic 781
91
Prosecution
101
Conditions of intervention
109
AustriaHungary 782
114
Recognition of new governments
119
Central America 947
140
Venezuela
149
Chile 56
162
Nonamicable short of
164
Analogues of contraband
165
MARITIME WAR
166
Vessels
174
Vessels of
187
A belligerent right 1266
188
Extraterritorial crime
200
Evidence
204
Hayti 954
216
Mode of exercise 1200
218
Mail steamers and mails 1201
225
Landing of submarine cables
227
Rights and duties of ministers
233
Of belligerency 74
242
Continuity of States
248
CHAPTER IV
255
Effects of change of sovereigntyContinued
256
Territorial expansion of United StatesContinued
257
1 Legislation of United States
262
Capture
269
CHAPTER VI
273
Supremacy of territorial sovereign
291
Revolution 90
301
To whom issued
309
4 Captures by privateers
314
Subsequent correspondence
320
Fourteen Diamond Rings
329
Germany 823
331
Report by Mr Dainese 1852
333
Cases and opinions 18991902
335
Ameliorations
350
ClaytonBulwer treaty
351
Mosquito question since 1860
367
Citizenship
373
Grounds of intervention
376
Naturalization not retroactive
401
Nationality of married women
408
Cutting of cables 1176
409
Double allegiance
426
Annexation of Texas
446
Prisoners 1177
451
Commercial intercourse
463
Modes of expatriation
466
Loss of right to national protection
474
Seamen
484
3 International copyright 182
490
International American conferences 969
496
CHAPTER IX
502
Applications
503
8
509
1 Persons born in the United States
515
Missionaries
521
Disabilities
541
Military service
547
Guano Islands
555
Seamen
566
Acts of private persons
569
Claims based on
641
INTEROCEANIC COMMUNICATIONS
652
Right of protection
657
Straits of Magellan
664
Police regulations
669
5 Use of canals 140
678
Classes and titles
696
1 General principles 144
698
CHAPTER VIII
699
Ceremonial 707
707
Freedom of the seas
708
Algiers 784
716
Powers and duties
717
Shipping and seamen
725
Relief of seamen
731
Term territories
732
Declarations of maritime
733
Power to settle
737
Negotiation and conclusion
739
4 Prescription 157
747
W Enforcement of treaties
757
3 Retaliatory or compulsive discriminations
767
Northeastern Fisheries
771
Survival of vested rights
780
Morocco
785
Tripoli
786
Tunis
787
Belgium
788
Bolivia
789
Brazil
790
Central America 1 Costa Rica
791
Honduras
792
Guatemala
793
Nicaragua
794
Salvador
795
Chile
796
China 1 Treaty of 1844
797
Treaties of 1858
798
Treaty of 1868
799
Immigration and other treaties 18801894
800
Taxes
801
Industries
802
Travel
803
Missionary privileges and protection 804
804
Purchase of land
805
Treaty ports and foreign settlements
806
Leases to European powers
807
Boxer movement 1 Siege and relief of legations
808
2 Negotiations for settlement
809
Practice of protection
810
Open door policy 1 The Hay agreement
811
2 AngloGerman agreement
812
Territorial integrity neutrality
813
Colombia
814
Congo
815
Corea
816
Denmark
817
Dominican Republic
818
XV Ecuador 819
819
American naturalization
842
Italy
844
Liberia
852
Cases of Enterprise and Hermosa
857
CHAPTER XXIII
863
H Doc 551
865
Inviolability of Territory
871
Whale fisheries 169
874
Peru
878
Reciprocity agreement 1891
886
Political intervention
897
Kinds
907
1 Jurisdiction and procedure
914
Private no longer admissible 1104
918
Questions of asylum
924
CHAPTER XX
927
Piracy
930
Agents of the State 623
931
Monroes message December 2 1823
936
Definitions
938
Urheberrecht

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Seite 3 - International law is part of our law, and must be ascertained and administered by the courts of justice of appropriate jurisdiction as often as questions of right depending upon it are duly presented for their determination.
Seite 435 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans, through which the produce of three-eighths of our territory must pass to market, and from its fertility it will ere long yield more than half of our whole produce, and contain more than half of our inhabitants.
Seite 416 - The modern usage of nations, which has become law, would be violated, that sense of justice and of right which is acknowledged and felt by the whole civilized world would be outraged, if private property should be generally confiscated, and private rights annulled. The people change their allegiance, their relation to their ancient sovereign is dissolved, but their relations to each other, and their rights of property, remain undisturbed.
Seite 635 - The navigation of the River St. Lawrence, ascending and descending from the 45th parallel of north latitude, where it ceases to form the boundary between the two countries, from, to, and into the sea, shall forever remain free and open for the purposes of commerce to the citizens of the United States, subject to any laws and regulations of Great Britain or of the Dominion of Canada, not inconsistent with such privilege of free navigation.
Seite 580 - Canada, acceding to this Confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into and entitled to all the advantages of this Union ; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same unless such admission be agreed to by nine States ARTICLE XII.
Seite 435 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans, fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations, who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment, we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Seite 621 - Those rivers must be regarded as public navigable rivers in law which are navigable in fact. And they are navigable in fact when they are used, or are susceptible of being used, in their ordinary condition, as highways for commerce, over which trade and travel are or may be conducted in the customary modes of trade and travel on water.
Seite 770 - States shall have liberty to take fish of every kind on such part of the coast of Newfoundland as British fishermen shall use (but not to dry or cure the same on that island) and also on the coasts, bays and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Seite 287 - Spain cedes to the United States the island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and the island of Guam in the Marianas or Ladrones.
Seite 475 - Ratmanoff, or Noonarbook, and proceeds due north, without limitation, into the same Frozen Ocean. The same western limit, beginning at the same initial point, proceeds thence in a course nearly southwest, through Behring's straits and Behring's sea, so as to pass midway between the northwest point of the island of St.

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