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“ for one, felt lio shame for the character or “ principles of that work; nor any other “ sorrow for the share he had in it than that “which the imperfection of his pieces “ was calculated to inspire. He was “told that this provision for Mr. Stuart " was substituted for a professorship of “medical jurisprudence, which it had been “intended to institute. He should like to “see the hon. gent. in the full swing of “ their insolence of power, making this “appointment, immediately after their “unqualified attacks upon their antagonists, “as much as to say, “Though you can do “nothing, we dare do every thing.” He “ doubted whether this same science of me“dical jurisprudence could be found any “ where mentioned, even in the Scotch “Encyclopaedia. (A laugh.) In answer “ to what the noble lord had said about “Newspapers, he would ask, was there no “ instance here, of a newspaper conspi“cuous for its attachment to the constitu“tion, and in the fairness of its mode of “ detailing all transactions in which its par“ty interests had place, whose proprietor was appointed Secretary to the Barrack “Board, at which a secretary was a new and a sinecure institution ?' This list was a hit, a palpable hit, at Mr. Perry; and fichly he deserves it. I told him he would repent of becoming a placeman. I told him it was better to continue to walk on foot, than to be drawn about in a wooden case by two horses at the expense of his indePendence. He is done up for ever; because, thoughout of place now, we know that he has been in ; and we never shall again look upon him as being actuated by public spirited motives. He is in the regiment, and that is *Duugh. I have inserted all the laughs in Mr. Canning's speech; and, it is truly curious to observe, how witty a man becomes he moment he is in place. Mr. Canning to: a great many long speeches while he was out of place, and nobody laughed. The laughing was, however, of short duration; for Ma. Curwes rose next after him, and Put, to him this simple question : “ have "not-you a pensian 2" Whereupon the right honourable Secretary, “with great dignity “ and feeling,” said, that, “ when he left the foreign office, a noble lord in another House and a Right Honourable Gentleman, now, unhappily, no more, had pressed him to take a pension, one half of which he had requested him to settle upon two very near and dear relations, who were dependant upon his labours for support; and, whether he merited this, or not, he must leave to be decided by

the noble lord in the other House.” This answer in plain language was: “ True, I “ have a pension, and so have my two sis“ters; but, it was granted by Lord Gren“ ville, who is one of your party, and by “ Pitt, whom you are constantly praising ; “ therefore, talk to Lord Grenville, or shut “ your mouth.” But, though this might be a very good answer to “ the gentlemen “ opposite,” was it an answer to the burdened and complaining people 2 Was it an answer to the widow, who out of a legacy of a hundred a year pays in direct taxes so much as to reduce the hundred to eighty one pounds a year 2 He takes half to himself and gives half to his sisters; that is to say, the Cannings get three pensions instead of one. And for what P Why, because he had been three or four years an under secretary of state at a solid salary of two thousand a year besides off cuts and slabs. Out of this salary he might have given his sisters what he so but, what reason was there for fastening them for life upon the people of this country “ They were de“ pendant upon his kabour for subsistence.” Very well; but, had the receiving of two thousand a year, for some years, from the public, disqualified him for labour? What was he lefore ? Had he earned more ? Had he lost any thing by being under-secretary of state Why, then, are we to work for the maintenance of his sisters, any more than for the sisters of another man 2 Oh! it is very easy to be kind to one's relations in this way. “Two very near and very dear “ relations !” Hi . . . . . . hi.... hickup '. Aye, one may force out a sort of a half blubber at it ; but, where is the reason and justice of the thing Where, too, is the kindness The public purse, at this late ; the labour of the people, becomes a source of paternal, fraternal, and filial affection, of personal friendship, and of Christian charity More of these pensions another time. They are a very pretty instance of the application of the public money ; and it will be very useful to keep them in view ; because there will a time come to put all such matters right. Next after the Canning Pensions naturally comes the Mildmay Contract, upon which subject nothing more, for the present, at least, would have been said by me, had not Sir Henry, with what degree of discretion I shall not presume to say, again agitated the question, by moving, in the House of Commons, on the 8th of this month, for the production of certain letters from some of the Moulsham Hall Jurymen. But, let us hear Sir Henry's ac

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after that administration had gone out of

office. His principal object in rising had “ been to move that there be laid before “ the house certain letters which he had “ received from some individuals of the “Jury, that had awarded aim the compen“ sation for the injury his property had sus“ tained. Of the whole of those who com“ posed the Jury, he was not acquainted “ with the addresses of: more than four, “ ore of whom was the for man. They “ were amongst the most respectable persons in the county. - The hon. baronet then read extracts from these letters, which explicitly stated, that the 16 acres, with the house, were not included in the estimate of compousation ; that the award did not preclude the won tara, et from esiding in or disposing of the joso, ot “, of the 1300l. awarded by the jury, so “ was for the injury done to the grouna oy the works, and to defray ti.e. expence of “ restoring it to the state in which it was ** before the construction of the works; and that the Jury were aware, at the “ time of making their award, of his being in treaty with government for the house"—Now let us take the points in their due order.—Sir Henry says, that “ the whole of the business respecting the “let’ing of the house took place after the Altington administration were out of office.” Aye, and so I told the public a fortnight ago, Sir Henry; but, you, Sir, told the house on the 20th of June, that “ the transaction took place under Mr. Ad“ dington's ministry, for whom you never “gave a vote in your life; so that if it was “ a jo, the ministry had jobbed against loose/tes.” This was an argument. Sir tuis was said in your detence; this was urged as a strong proof in your favour; at a this proof you have now been compellea to sive up, the truth being, that, though your laid was put into the hands of govern

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“ to him yet as satisfactory as could be “ desired. There seemed to be some strange “ mistake in the case, because the hon. ka“. ronet had stated in his eramination before the committee, that the 400l a year was to procure him another residence; and “ NOJW it was said to have been granted, on the general ground of enabling him “...to restore the land from the injury done “by the works. If the sum had been “ awarded for the rent, it would have been “ an exorbitant allowance to make an award “ at the rate of 20l. per acre; and if for “ the land, the whole of the compensation

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“ to be satisfactory.”—Yes, this is the pinch. There is mogetting out or it. A correspondent,

whose litter l insert in another part of this sheet, and who labours hard to defend Sir

I suppose 3 Eh, Sir Henry “Volunteers?" Well we shall see who and what these letter-writers' are; and we shall then be at perfect liberty

to canvass their conduct too. That is all that remains now to be done; for, as to the rest' Henry, says, “It is one thing for a gentle* man to have his residence rendered un

pleasant, from the vicinity of military works, and to receive a compensation to enable him to procure another residence : and another thing to let the residence.” Aye, is it; quite another thing; but, then. if he receives £400 a year because the residence is rendered unpleasant, he is not to receive another £400 a wear, and that, too, from the same party, for the use of such residence But, this 'unpleasant is a miserable shuffle. Sir Henry swears, before the Commissioners, that the Jury gave him £400 a year to provide hion with another tolace of residence; and, when the Borrack-Master General says that to rent the house will be a waste of the public money, Mr. Brownigg tells him, that it must be rented, as a remumeration to Sir Henry Mildmay for the loss of his residence. If this is not being paid twice for the same thing, there is no possibility of ascertaining the meaning of words. Can the Jurymen say, that they were informed, that Sir Henry Mildmay was freed from residence, at his own special request, and at the public expence 2 Can they say, that they were informed, that he was to receive £400 for the rent of his house, from the public If they can say this, then it will remain for them to account for their enormous award; and, if they cannot say this, of what weight is any thing that they can say upon the subject. I insert, in another part of this sheet, a letter from a Hampshire freeholder, which will shew, that Sir Henry's case is not at all misunderstood.—We will now take our leave of Sir Henry Mildmay, for the present, and stretch across to the coast of Africa.-I mentioned the affair, the pretty little quiet affair, of Sierra Leone, in my last sheet. I observed, that we had been paying most smartly for this project, and that we should have to pay still more for it. I will now just insert the brief report of what passed upon the subject on the 7th of this month in the Honourable House of Commons. “ Mr. H. Thornton present. “ed a petition from the Sierra Leone Company, praying, aid. Lord Temple wished to know if the bill for transferring this possession to the crown was to be carried into a law: any grant to the company would in that case be unnecessary. The Chancellor of the Exchequer said that a * bill was now in progress. The aid to be “granted was enly for the maintenance of the settlement till the transfer could take place.-Mr. Dent gave notic", that he would fn due season oppose what he could

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“ describe by no milder term, than that of “ the RANKEST JOB that had ever come “ before parliament.” No, Sir, not the rankest. I could point out to you some jobs, transacted in former parliaments, that very far surpass this. Now, what a noble field for emulation and for the reward of m erit is here opening again Here will be a governor, a commander in chief, aides de camp, secretaries, law-officers, collectors, comptroilers, surveyors, searchers, waiters; and, the Lord have mercy upon us, where will the list end How many “genteel fa“ milies' will get handsome things” done for them now ! H re is another hour or two of hard lahour in a year for every Fnglishman whose lot it is to eat his own earnings.--—So nuch for “Jobs,” as they are called in the reports of the debates which take place in the Honourable House; and, after that subject, there comes very naturally that of II. CLos F. D. Doors. On the 6th instant, Mr. Whitbread, in conse- . quence of a previous notice, brought forward a motion on the State of the Nation, that being the term made use of as a signal for a grand combat, during the long wars of Pitt and Fox, which wars were infinitely more injurious to England than were the wars of the red and white roses. When all was ready, the two battalions of the regiment regularly. drawn up, and the repor, eis with pens in their button-hole bottles, prepared to record the deeds of the heroes on each side, Mr. Whitbread set on thus: “I am not, “Sir, altogether unaccustomed to address * this assembly. During the number of. “ years I have had the honour of a seat “ among you, it has been my lot to bring forward several important propositions,

vourable reception, but the greater part a determined opposition. Yet never have I been in the habit of making any apology for the insufficiency of the proposer, however strongly I felt it, thinking it better to rely on the solidity of the grounds upon which my propositions rested, than to attempt conciliating attention by apologies. But I must confess on this occasion, whether from the growing diffidence of the public in public men ; whether from the manner in which I bave been recently spoken of . in this Assembly; whether from the nature of the debates which have lately taken place amongst us, in which a spirit of attack and recrimination has been manifested, by no means coo lated to raise the character of this house (a foud cry of hear' hear ); whether from the

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some of which have experienced a sa- . . “ disastrous state of the times, or whether “ from all these feelings combined, I never “ rose with so great a degree of diffidence “ and solicitude. If in my endeavours to “bring back the gravity of debate—to get “ rid of the spirit of recrimination which “ has too long prevailed amongst us, and “ to retrieve the falling fortunes of this “ mighty empire"— . . . . . . Here the Right Hon. D. Browne, of Mayo, rose to order, and moved that strangers be excluded, which was accordingly done immediately; and, as the reporters and others were scrambling out through the passages and down the stairs, they cried out occasionally, with the king in Hamlet, “Lights, lights, “ho! away! away!" Though I do not know, and have never before even heard of, the Right Honourable Browne, I like his motion exceedingly. For the profane vul‘gar to know what was said upon such an occasion would have been very wrong indeed; and, it would have been still worse for Napoleon to know it; for, without doubt, there were discussed, during that long debate, most extensive and profound plans of national policy. The causes of Napoleon's successes and of our failures were, I dare say, clearly developed; and, I am full as confident, that the means of warding off the consequences were as clearly placed before the Honourable House. But, any pleasure, great as it, doubtless, would have been, that I should have derived from a perusal of such developement, I freely forego it for the good of my country. “In the multitude of councillors there is “ wisdom.” What a happy people, then,

are we, who have nearly a thousand of.

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the Register.

The closing of the doors. came, indeed, some week, or so, too late, .

reasoning; for, I dare engage, that the Right Honourable Dennis Browne, of Mayo, knew very well what to do, without consulting any minister whatever. As to his voting upon the side of ministers, it was, of course, because he thought it best so to do; and, from what other motive ought a man to vote 2 I am quite indignant at these slanderous iusinuations, and particularly as coming from one who was, only the other day, a stout champion for “regu“ lar government, social order, and our “ holy religion,” chiming in, second bell, to John Bowles. CoNTINENTAL WAR.——Upon this subject I have so much to say, that I can say hardly any thing at present. The war has ended precisely as I foretold at its outset. I of what I thought would be the result, and I gave my reasons at large for my opinion. How much and shamefully I was abused for that opinion, the reader will not have forgotten; and, all that I now ask of him, is, to read over, once more, my articles, upon this, war, at its beginning, which articles he will, find in volume X of The shaking fit seems to have returned to many persons. They really seem to have thought, that the Boulogne fleet would never be heard of again ' And now they are filled with dread. For my part, I feel less apprehension than formerly. Not that I should like a set of upstart, unprincipled villains, who would swear truth out of the world, to hold the rod over me, to pillage me in virtue of one of , their accursed decrees, to send their civil hirelings to rob me, while their foreign armed ruftians stood by to keep me in awe; no, God forbid that I should like this, that I should ever bring my mind patiently to contemplate submission so degrading; but, I have, from long thinkipg: upon the subject, brought myself to a con: “. viction, that the French never will succeed!" in bringing us, into this state. The okyo and the wherefore I might have some difloculty in detailing; but, the conviction { entertain, and under it I am easy; and, what is more, I am fully persuaded, that, however some persons may tremble, this, conviction is felt by ninety-nine out of every hundred men in the nation... I do not reason . much upon the matter. I have done asking. how the French can get here or to Ireland,” and how we are able to repel them. I knowthe enemy to be powerful by land, and that he may soon become powerful by sea F. I see the force of all Europe collected against . us, and I have considered in detail the . probable acts of such a conqueror; but,

when I consider who we have for Comman

ders, and particularly for Commander in

Chief; when I consider the strength of our armies; when I cousider the extent of our immense resources, and the manner of distributing those resources; when I consider, in short, the whole of the force and state of the nation, the whole of the scene that lies before one, I stop not to reason, but involuntarily exclaim, Buonaparte, I set thy utmost ingenuity, power and malice at de fiance! I fear one thing, indeed, and that is that our gallant friends, the Hanoverians, will not be able to get at the French. This was a dirty trick in the Danes, who are said to have shut (out of pure envy I dare say) the Sound against our expedition! I was always afraid of something of this sort. I said, that the Hanoverians would arrive too soon or too late; and now, curse light upon the Danes, they are stopping them! The Courier recommends war against the Danes, and so do l I would sell the short off my back to support a war against the Danes. What right had they to stop our expedition? Now it will come back again, Lord Cathcart and all, without having got even a glimpse of the French. The Morning Post, at the conclusion of a long paragraph about Napoleon's recent victories, says, “ as to his views against this country, “ they will assuredly prove abortive; for here “ he will find a people united to a man, and “ ready to shed their blood to the last drop “ in defence of a sovereign whom they “ adore.” I was very glad to hear him say this so soon after he had represented no small part of us as “ Jacobins and Levellers.” Whatever else he may think of us, he does not, at any rate, attribute to us a revengeful disposition. He is manifestly persuaded, that we shall, in the hour of danger, forget all the calumnies and all the insults ...that have been heaped upon us; and now, *I hope, he will cease from his endeavours to proce divisions amongst us. I think he wiły’and I should suppose that John Bowles (khö must be in a terrible fright) will be cautious how he employs his venomous pen. But, while I hope, that we shall be unanimous in our endeavours to defend our country from without, I must put in my protest against the doctrine, that this is no time for reformation at home, being convinced that such reformation is absolutely necessary.—To this subject I shall return in my next Want of room compels me to defer what I have to offer to my readers upon Lord Cochrane's excellent motions, as also upon the curious affair of Mr. Mills' manner of

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coming into the honourable house; upon the Irish insurrection bill; upon the arrival of the Duchess of Brunswick; and upon the Delicate Investigation. Sir Henry Mildmay. SIR,--I am not surprised at anything the Editor of the Morning Chronicle will do, in the way of political animosity, against those who are of the opposite party. But, I must confess, I am somewhat at a loss to account for the countenance and support you have given the people of that paper, in their invidious conduct towards Sir Henry Mildmay, respecting his job with the Barrack Department. It appears to me that very few of the transactions of that department are free from blame, and most of them highly reprehensible. But it is a conduct the most disgraceful in the editor of a public print, to select one solitary circumstance, and to follow it up with that audacious pertinacity: this with respect to Sir Henry Mildmay has been, and to leave others entirely unnoticed, and which, in point of enormity, compared with this, are as a mountain to a molehill. There can be no doubt, but this war carried on by the Morning Chronicle, against Sir Henry Mildmay, proceeds entirely from personal motives, and has not the least particle of public utility in view; and what is more to be lamented, such conduct towards an individual tends rather to strengthen and confirm abuses than to bring about a just and wholesome reformation. And you, Sir, in support of such malevolence, have gone farther than any of the facts belonging to the

circumstance will justify what you have as

serted. You have stated, that Sir Henry has knowingly and willingly received payment for the same thing twice. I do not mean to justify the transaction, nor have I any doubt, but this, like many others, has been a most improvident one on the part of the public. But what you have asserted with respect to Sir Henry's being paid twice for the same thing, is not the fact: and let it be remembered, that this assertion of yours, and two or three questions put by the Morning Chronicle, in such a way as to have a very material effect upon the public, in making up its decision upon the merits and demerits of the whole transaction. I cannot believe, if you have paid attention to the documents you have read on the subject, but that you must have discovered a clear and evident distinction, between the 400 received by Sir Henry, as a compensation for the loss of his residence, and the of 400 received by him for the rent of his house. It , is one thing for a gentleman to have his re

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