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" verdict—for they were locked up three hours before they agreed upon it. They gave a verdict of 1300l. for thirty acres one rood, &c. on which the military works stood. But he would ask, if there was a single word in the verdict that prevented him from living in the house or pulling it down, if he thought proper: and a surveyor had valued the house at 10,000 pounds, which would produce 400l. a-year. Was there any thing that prevented him from letting the house to the Speaker of the House of Commons, to Government, or to any one else? The thirty acres for the military works, had nothing whatever to do with the Barrack Office agreement as to the house and twenty acres. The furniture for such a house was worth a good round sum. This estate was worth above Aé11,000, and had a suitable house. For this f400 a-year was no adequate compensation. He had been told that the Grand Junction Canal had to go through Lord Essex's Park, and he would be contented with one-fourth of the compensation from Government that Lord Essex received from private individuals.’ The noble lord over the way (Howick) had said, that he was unfit to sit on the Committee of Finance, on account of the facts that were stated in the Report. This was certainly premature decision. The Military Committee themselves had said that no imputation rested on him. They only said that the Barrack Board had made a negligent bargain for the public; at all events lie would not be a moment longer in possession of this lease, and he intreated of his Majesty's Ministers to have a fresh Jury inspannelled. He wished to justify himself, and would answer any questions that should be put to him, either at the Bar of the House, in his place, or in a Court of Justice. As he had spoken from memory, some subordinate points might not be accurately stated, but the substance was correct." He concluded by moving for the production of a Memorial which he had given in, to the Commissioners of Military Inqui“ry.” It is very easy to cry calumny, when a man is accused; but, amongst the anonymous assailants Sir Henry Mildmay cannot, at any rate, include me, who have never in thy whole life written and published any thing, except my first pamphlets in America, to which I have not put my name. I should have been glad to find (and I say this with perfect sin

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cerity) in the speech of Sir Henry Mildimay a complete justification; because Lis , - u f... ." * * * * *

coduct in Hampshire at the first election, and particularly his bringing forward the

| petition against the interference of the late

ministry, was such as to merit great praise. There is also one circumstance brought out in his speech, which weighs in his favour, namely, that the bill, freeing him from the obligation of residence, did not, in its effect, extend further than the terin for which the lands were let to the public. But, I must confess, that this is the only favourable new circumstance that I can perceive.—As to the report of the Commissioners of Military inquiry, from what I have seen of other reports, I am disposed always to form my judgement upon the documents on which they are founded; and, that Sir Henry Mildmay may be convinced, that I wish the public to receive, or, at least, to retain, no unjust impression against him, I shall insert the documents here, relative to the Moulsham contract.—The first document has no date. It is a something of Sir J. Craig, calling upon two Justices of the peace to apply to the Sheriff to impannel

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price for the House, but that it will require ..[250 to put it in repair, though in the evidence of Sir Henry Mildmay, he states that he looked upon it as being in perfect repair. On the 11th of June the Secretary at war writes to the then Barrack-Master, General Delancy, stating that Sir Henry Mildmay agrees to give up £200 towards Thus, them, the bargain was coilcluded in the month of June, 1804, aud, then Sir Henry knew, that he was to re. ceive £400 a year for the rent of his house and pleasure grounds surrounding it. It was after this, on the 6th of August, 1804, that the Jury met, with two cool on the part of Sir Henry Mildmay and no counsel or advocate on the part of the poblic ; and they

awarded him 1,300 a year for the first year

and fö00 for each succeeding year, for the use of 31 acres of ground, occupied by the military works, taking into consideration that the works had destroyed his place of residence, This award seems enormous ; for the land must be very good indeed if it was annually worth of 2 an acre, that is to say sé62 a year. Sir Henry Mildmay says, upon his oath, that the Jury allowed £200 a year for the use of the land, and #8400 a year to provide him with another place of residence, which was, I think, a pretty hard bargain for the public, and a pretty good one for Sir Henry Mildmay, especially when he had obtained an act of parliament, at the public erpence, to release him from the obligation of residence in a house standing in need of sé250 laid out in repairs; but, what will be said, then, what can be said, for Sir Henry Mildmay, who received this award, who accepted of the £400 a year from the public, as a compensation for the loss of his place of residence, after he had, wnknown to the jury, already bargained with -tbe government to receive sé'400 for that same place of residence from that same pub!-lic?—Nothing, but proof that the documents are forgeries can possibly alter the ... state of this, case; though there is a further : document which adds strength to it. . General. Hewett, after he became Barrack - Master General, made, as the reader will see, an objection to concluding the lease for the house, stating that it was “incurring a ... “-heavy expence to the public without any - “ apparent benefit.” But, Mr. Brownrigg, by command of the Duke of York, tells him, that “it was thought necessary to hire the house to REMUNERATE

“ Sir Henry Mildmay whose place of

- “ residence had been destroyed by the field works.” Here, then, we have the trouble compensation in express terms. Mr. o, Brownrigg says the House is taken at £400 a year to remunerate Sir Henry Mildmay for the loss of his place of residence; and Sir Henry Mildmay, upon his oath before the Commissioners, states that the jury awarded him, and that he has received at 400 to provide him with another place of residence.— Sir Henry Mildmay may complain of calumnies as long as he pleases; but, until he can prove these documents to be forgeries, every man, who reads this Register must be convinced, that Sir Henry Mildmay, a member of parliament, a guardian of the public money, has, out of that money, received, knowingly and willingly, payment twice for the same thing. There was one circumstance, stated in Sir Henry Mildmay’s speech, which, at the first glance, I thought somewhat favourable; but, up

have jobbed against themselves.

on looking at the dates this impression was at once removed. He says the transaction took place under the administra-, tion of Mr. Addington, to whom he never gave a vote in his life; so that if it was, a job, it was singular that the ministry should Now, if this statement had been correct, it would have had great weight with me, as far as related to the motives of the ministers, though no weight at, all, as far as related to Sir Henry Mildmay's conduct towards the public. , But, this statement is not correct; it is not true; but the reverse of truth; for, though land was occupied, and the bill to excuse residence was passed, under the administration of Mr. Addington, the bargain for the House was not made, no, nor did Sir Henry Mildmay make any offer to let the House to the public, nor was he summoned, until that Pitt, for whom he always voted, came into power, and then, in just one week after that, he made the offer. These dates are pestering things. . if all the documents had been like that of Sir James. Craig, a tolerably plausible story might have been made out, as far ás related to the conduct of the ministers—Now for Mr. Sturges (he has another name, but one is quite enough for me).--This Gentleman was a Secretary of the Treasury, under the second golden reign of Pitt ; , and, it will be seen by the documents, inserted below, that General Hewett called for so?50 to put Sir Henry Mildmay's House in repair, in answer to which call Mr. Sturges signs an order for issuing, from the public money, 643 pounds. In his defence he said, that’s fie was an“swerable for any mistake in the letter, “ but when he had to sign so many it was not surprising that a mistake should have “ occurred in one, which it was not thought “ required any very minute attention. ". “ letter ought not to have alluded to repairs “ at all, and the gentlemen must have ** known that the letter admitted of a dif“ferent construction from what they had “ put upon it. Having stated this, he left “ it to the house to judge of the fairness of “ their proceedings. He would ask the no“ble lord (H. Petty), whether he had found “ that he had ever been apt to make use of

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24! JULY 4, 1807–Sir Henry Mildmay.

whin f250 at most, ought to have been issued for the repairs of Sir Henry Mildmay's * house, E643 were ordered to be issued, and "we have nothing to make us believe, thou that sum was not issued, a point upon which no member of parliament recollected to touch, but one which is well worth inquiring into.—So, “it is not surprising,”that mistakes of this sort are made Then we are in a comfortable way indeed! When we complain, that such enormous sums of the public money are expended upon salaries with scarcely any duty attached to them, “ oh," say our enemies, “ but the respon“sibility to Would you allow nothing for that And when we discover that the money is wasted in the way now exposed, we are answered by merely saying it was a mistake, and that we ought not to be at all surprized at it. Surprized at it I am not; but, to be told, that l ought not to be surprized at it, is being a little too bold with my endurance.——Mr. Sturges has complained of the Morning Chronicle for not inserting the speech of Lord Henry Petty, who acquitted "him of any blame; - but, of what consequence is this sort of acquittal 2 At most it amounts merely to evidence to character; and, of that...evidence every man will, of course, form his own opinion. I do not wish to labour this point against Mr. Sturges. "Here are the documents, and I wish to leave the reader to form his own opinion. N. B. Sir James Craig's paper to the two Justices and the award of Jury are omitted, because the former is of no consequence at all in the consideration, and because the substance of the latter consists wholly in the date of it, and in the sum awarded, the rest being a mere mass of verbosity and tautology. . . . . Ertract of a Letter from Sir Henry Mildmay, Baronet, to the Quarter Master General; dated Somerset-street, May 15, 1804. The substance of my proposition is, that thc house and stables should be appropriated to the residence of the staff which may reside in that district, and the rent which I annex to the occupation is four hundred pounds a year. I propose to leave in the house the whole of the furniture (with the exception perhaps of a few trifling articles) which I found there, which was always considered as fully sufficient for the use of the family who previously resided -The term which I inean to let it is four years, or five, at the option of either party. I expect to be exempted from all taxes; and as the house is now in perfect repair, I think it reasonable, that, in case any dilapidations should arise, that government should undertake to replace them, ,

(22 Letter from Major General Brownrigg to Francis Moore, Esq. Dated Horse Guards, Iuli. J.uy, 1804. SIR, I have it in command from his Royal Highness the Commander in Chief, to request that you will call the attention of the Secretary at War to the following circumstances: A considerable extent of the entrenched camp at Chelmsford passes through Moulsham Park, a residence of Sir Henry Mildmay. This gentleman, by the will of a relation, was bound to residence; but being willing to accommodate the public, he admitted of the works being constructed, and a general authority was given to the Commander in Chief by my Lord Hobart, to hire the house for the accommodation of the general in command, and his staff—It was found this transaction could not be completed without an act of parliament, to exonerate Sir Henry Mildmay from the penalties attaching to nonresidence, according to the will of his relation. A bill has in consequence been carried through both houses, and I am commanded by his Royal Highness the Commander in Chief to request the authority of the Secretary at War to conclude this transaction, by hiring the house and furniture for a period of four years, at the annual Arent of four hundred a year, the terms which are specified in the inclosed extract a letter from Sir Henry Mildmay.—- I have it further in command to observe, that, should the lieutenant general commanding in the district judge it expedient to fix his head quarters at Chelmsford, the amount of his lodging-money, and that of his staff (which will be saved by his/occupying this residence) will be equivalent to the rent paid to Sir Henry Mildmay. But, should it be occupied by a major general, some unavoidable expence must annually accrue to the public. I have, &c.—(Signed) Rob. BrowsRIGG, Q. M. Gl. Letter from James Johnson, Esq. to Ilieut"

General De Lancey. Dated Barrack QfJice, 24th May, 1804. . . . . -- *

SIR,--In obedience to your orders I proceeded to Moulsham, near Chelmsford, in Essex, the seat cf Sir Henry Saint John Mildmay, Baronet; inclosed I transoit you the plans and particulars of the said premises.—The mansion is strong and well

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center of the house requires re-laying, and making good; stone steps should be re-set, and made good with new ; great part of the ywood-work in basement story, such as floors, joists, skirting, &c. require immediate repairs, being rotted by damps; brick-work outside of house, garden walls, doors, doorcases, require repairs. Stable building: roof very bad, brick-work to external walls require making good, and settlements secured; floors in hay loft, and servants sleeping rooms very bad; it rains in in several laces. The mansion is in general furnished, which may be more fully explained by inventory from Sir Henry Mildmay.— To put the house and offices into tenantable repair will cost the sum of two hundred and fifty pounds; the annual amount after will not exceed fifty pounds to keep them in repair. The taxes are supposed to amount to one hundred and forty-three pounds. If the said premises are put in proper repair, and to include the twenty acres of pleasure ground, &c. round the house, as described on the general plan, I am of opinion, four hundred pounds per annum is a fair rent to give for the same, after Sir Henry has put the premises in repair.—I have, &c.—JAs. Johnson, Arch". Letter from the Right Hon. Wm. Dundas to Lieut. General De Lancey. Dated War Office, 11th June, 1804. SIR,-Having communicated to Sir Henry Mildmay the report of Mr. Johnston, transmitted in Lieutenant Colonel Gordon's letter of the 29th, ultimo, and Sir Henry Mildmay having offered to relinquish half a year's rent (£200) on condition that the repairs pointed out by Mr. Johnson should be executed at the expence of the public, I have thought it right to accede to this proposal, and am to desire that you will accordingly enter into an agreement with Sir Henry Mildmay, for the hire of the premises of Moulsham Hall for sour years, charging the rent, taxes, and repairs thereof, in your accompts, and availing yourself, for the use of the public, of the advantage (if any) that may arise from the possession of the land attached to the said premises. I have the honour to be, Sir, your most obedient, humble servant, W. DuNDAs. . Letter from Lieut. General Hewett to Major General Brownrigg. Dated Barrack Of. jice, 27th Nov. 1804. SIR,--The expences which will at

tend the taking of Sir H. Mildmay's house.

amounting to a sum beyond the latitude given by the Treasury to the present Barrack Master General, I am induced, previous to my transmitting it for approval, to observe, for his Royal Highness's consideration, that

the situation and extensive scale on which it is constructed, as well as the length of time which has elapsed since it was inhabited, render it, as a matter of choice, very unfit for any officer to inhabit, in preference to hired accommodations in the town of Chelmsford; and as the annual expence will amount to six hundred and forty-three pounds, as per inclosed estimate, exclusive of two hundred and fifty pounds for immediate repair, and as the house cannot be applied to other purposes, I should not consider, myself justified in proposing the incurring so great an expence, without any apparent benefit to the public. You will observe the authority for taking this house was dated last June, and might have been completed under the authority of the late Barrack Master General; that the delay has not arisen from me, but, perhaps, from a change of opinion on the part of his Royal Highness, on the grounds I have stated.—-I have the honour

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dence had been destroyed by the field works which had been constructed in the immediate vicinity of the house. You will be pleased to direct a report to be made to Lieut. General Sir James Craig, when the building is in readiness to receive the officers he may direct to inhabit it. I have the honour to be, &c. &c.—Ron ERT BRow NRigg, Qr. Master Gen. - Letter from the Barrack Master General to hilliam Huskisson, Esq. Dated, Barrack Office, 13th Feb. 1805. - *

SIR, Inclosed is the copy of a letter from the Quarter Master General, notifying to me the commands of his Royal Highness the Commander in Chief, to put in a state of repair the premises hired from Sir Henry Mildmay near Chelmsford, to be occupied by the general and staff officers attached to the troops at that station; but as the lease of the said premises was not signed by the late Barrack Master General, although possession was taken by placing a person in charge thereof, and the repairs, mentioned in Major Gen. Brownrigg's letter, executed, amounting to two hundred and fifty pounds; I have the honour, in conformity to the Treasury minute of the 6th Nov. (which precludes me from incarring any expence exceeding five hundred pounds, without the previous sanction of the lords commissioners) to request their lordships approval to complete

the lease in question.—-Fortheir lordships'

further information, an estimate of the expence is here with transmitted. . . . : Detter from IVilliam Sturges Bourne, Esq. to the Barrack Master General. Dated, Treasury Chambers, Feb. 28, 1805. SIR, Having laid boots the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury your letter, transmitting a copy of one from the Quarter Master General, notifying to him the commands of his Royal Highness the Commander in Chief, to put in a state of repair the premises hired from Sir Henry Mildmay, near Chelmsford, to be occupied by the general and staff officers attached to the troops at that station, and inclosing an estimate of the expences thereof, amounting to sir hundred and forty-three pounds, and also requesting the approval of this board to complete the lease in question; I have received their lordships commands to authorise you to pay the said sum, and to complete the

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BovaNE. -Eramination of Sir Henry Panlet St. John Mildmay, Bart.; taken upon Oath, the 28th April, 1806.

We have learned that a military work,

has been carried through your park at Moulsham, near Chelmsford; state under

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pounds per annum for the occupation of the

land, and four hundred pounds per annum to provide me with another place of residence. The two hundred pounds a year is actually paid by me to my tenants.-Q.3. Have you still the right to the feed of the land so occupied ?–A. It is a complete occupation on the part of government.—Q-4. Was the offer originally made by you to any public authority, to take your house at Moulsham, or was an application made to you for it 2–A. I made the offer, I think, to the then Deputy Bartook Master General.— Q. 5. What was the reason of your making the offer?—A. From my having resided a good deal in Essex, I had seen the difficulty the different generals on the staff had of procuring residences, and, in consequence of repeated applications to me, for the house from different general officers Huartered at Chelmsford, f made the offer of it. Upon my making the offer to the then Deputy Barrack Master General, I was informed, that nothing could be done without a survey and report to him : some time afterwards I heard that a report had been made to him, and, in consequence of it, I was referred to General Brownrigg, and the Secretary at War, who treated with me for the house and premises.—Q. 6. Was this your usual re

sidence whilst in the country?—A. I was

bound to reside there, by will, three months in the year, till relieved by an act of parliament, procured at the expence of government, in consequence of the works erected near it, as already stated.—Q. 7. Is the land let with the house, stated to amount to near twenty acres, mere pleasure ground, or can it be applied to any useful purpose, consistent with the terms of the lease granted by you ?—A. It is partly pleasure ground; but there is a large garden, partly inclosed, of about two acres, which I have no doubt would let for about eighteen pounds a year,

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