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chasseurs, and a brigade of dragoons. He camp, fell in with them, and threw them in

met the enemy about day break, between

Passenwerder and Stege, attacked him, routed, and closely pursued him 11 leagues, made 1 100 prisoners, killed and wounded a great number, and took 4 pieces of cannon. —Thus the enemy has suffered considerable losses, at various points, since the 12thOn the 17th the Emperor caused the fusi lers of the guard to manoeuvre: they are encamped near the castle of Finckens' ein in barra, ks, equally as handsome as those at Eogne —On the 18th-and 19th the Impe; as “lord encamped topon the same spot. ––Prince Jerome is encamped in Silesia, with a corps of observation, covering the sieg of Neisse——On the 12th the Prince lear: ed. that a colunya of 30′ 0 men had left Gotz to surprise Breslau . He ordered Gen. febvre to advance with the 1st Bavarian regiment, and a detachment of 300 Saxons. In the morning of the 14th, the general came up with the enemy's rear near Cauth, which he immediately attacked, made himself naster of the village with the bayonet, and took 153 prisoners: 100 of the Bavarian light cavalry fell upon those of the enemy, 509 in number, routed and dispersed them. The enemy again formed in order of battle, and offered resistance : 300 Saxons fled; this extraordinary conduct must have been the effects of dissatisfaction, as the Saxons have always behaved with valour ever since they joined the French. However. this unexpected event brought the first Bavarian regiment into a very critical situation. They lost 150 men, who were made prisoners, and they were compelled to beat a retreat, which they effected in good order. The enemy retook the village of Cauth —In the morning, at 11 o'clock, Gen. Dumuy, who had advanced from Breslau with 1000 French dismounted dragoons, hussars and chasseurs, attacked the enemy in the real : 150 of the hussars retook the village, after a charge with the bayonet, made 100 prisoners, and liberated all the Bavarians made prisoners by the Prussians.—The enemy, in order to facilitate his retreat to Glatz, had separated in two columns. General Lefebvre, who left Schweidnitz on the 15th, fell in with one of these columns, killed 100, and made 400 prisoners, including 30 offcers. A Polish regiment of lance-bearers had arrived on the preceding evening at Frankenstein, and a detachment of these being sent to join Gen. Lefebvre, by Prince Jerome, distinguished themselves on this ccou-oon.--The second column endeavoured to regain Glatz, by passing the Silberberz. Lieut. Gen. Ducoudrais, the Prince's aid-de

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disorder. Thus a column of between 3000 and 4000 men, that left Glitz, was unable to return. They have been either killed, made prisoners, or dispersed.

76th Bulletin of the Grand French Army.

Finkenstein, May 20 A fine English corvette, copper sheathed, having 120 English for her crew, and laden with powder and ball, presented herself off Dantzic, with an intention to enter that port. On approaching near our works, she was attacked from both the shores with a heavy shower of musketry, and forced to surrender. . A picquet of the regiment of Paris was the first to leap on board. An aid-de-camp of Gen. Kalkreuth, who was on his return from thos Russian head quarters, and several English officers, were taken on board the vessel. Sbe is called the Undaunted, and had Go Russians on board, besides the 120 Puglish. —The enemy's loss in the affair of Weichselmünde, on the 15th, was greater than was at first supposed. A Russian column, which held out to the last, was put to the bayonet to a man. There were 1300 Russians buried.—On the 16th a Russian division of 6000 men, under General Turkow. advanced from Brock to the Bug and towards Pultusk, with a view to prevent the execution of some new works for streng hening the tete du pont. These works were defended by six Bavarian battalions, under the command of the Crown Prince in person. The enemy advanced four times to the attack, and were four times repulsed by the Bavarians, and covered with grape shot from the batteries of the different works. Marshal Massena estimates the enemy's loss at 300 killed, and twice as many wounded. And what renders the conflict still more glorious is, that the Bavarians were not quite 400. The Crown Prince commends, in particular, the Bavarian General Haron Wrede, an officer of conspicuous merit. The loss of the Bavarians amounted to 15 killed. and 150 wounded.—The same mismanagement, as in the attack of the 16th at Pultusk, was displayed in that which the cnemy made on the 13th, against the works of Gen. Lemarrois; nor was their want of judgment less conspicuous in the preparation of a great number of rafts, which the enemy were preparing on the Bug for these six wedks past.

• The resuit was, that those rafts which lock

them so long in preparation, were burnt in two hours time; and that those repeated attacks upon works well contrived, and defended by strong batteries, without a chance of success, have Produced to.2m, a consider

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ly felt by the enemy. A mine which was contrived near the outer bastion, had the effect of blowing it up. A communication has been opened with the covered way by four entrances, and we are employed in filling up the ditch. eviewed the 9th provisional regiment. The o eight of those regiments have already been embodied. The Genoese conscripts among those regiments are much extolled for the readiness and zeal displayed by them. - 77th Bulletin of the Grand French Army. Finckenstein, May 29. Dantzic has capitulated. That fine city is in our possession. Eight hundred picces of artillery, magazines of every kind, more than 500,000 quintals of grain, well-stored cellars, immense collections of Cloathing and spices; great lesources of every kind for the army; lastly, a place of the first order for strength on our left wing, as Thorn supports our centre, and Praga our right; these are the advantages wbtained during winter, and which have signalized the leisure hours of the grand army; this is, indeed, the first fruit of the victory of Eylau. The rigour of the season, the snow which has so often covered our trenches, the ice which has added fresh difficulties, have afforded no obstacles to our operations. Marshal Lefebvre has braved all; he has animated with the same spirit the Saxons, the Poles, the troops of Baden, and has made them all conduce to his end. The difficulties which the artillery had to conquer were considerable. One hundred pieces of artillery, 5 or 0000 pounds weight of powder, and an immense quantity of bullets have been drawn from Stettin, and the strong places in Silesia. It was necessary to surmount many difficulties in removing the artillery, but the Vistula afforded easy and expeditious means. The marines of the guards have passed their boats under the fort of Grandentz with their accustomed skill and resolution. General Chasseloup, General Kingener, Colonel Lacosta, and in general all the officers of the engineers, have

This day the Emperor.

served in the most distinguished manner.

The sappers have shewn an uncommon de

gree of intrepidity. The whole corps of artillery, under General Lariboissire, has sustained its reputation. The 2d regiment of light infantry, the 12th, and the troops of Paris, with Generals Schramm and Puthod, have distinguished themselves. A detailed journal of this siege will soon be drawn up with care. It will consecrate a great number of acts of bravery, worthy of being exhibited as examples, and such as must excite enthusiasm and admiration.——On the 17th, the mine blew up a block house, attached to the guard house on the covered way. On the 19th, the descent and passage of the fosse were executed at seven o'clock in the evening. On the 21st, Marshal Lefebvre having prepared every thing for the assault, they were proceeding to the attack, when Colouel Lacosti, who had been sent in the morning into the place upon some business, signified that General Kalkreuth demanded to capitulate on the same conditions that he had formerly granted to the garrison of Mayence. This was agreed to. The Hakelsburgh would have been stormed with

very little loss, but the body of the place was

yet entire. A large fosse, full of running water, presented such difficulties that the besieged might have held out for fifteen days longer. In this situation it appeared proper to grant them an honourable capitulation.— On the 27th, the garrison marched out, with General Kalkreuth at its head. This strong garrison, which at first consisted of 16,000 men, was reduced to 9000 men, of which number 4000 have deserted. Among the deserters there are even officers. “We will not,” they say, “go to Siberia.” Many thousands of artillery horses have been given up to us, but they are in very bad condition. They are now drawing up the inventory of the magazines. General Rapp is named Governor of Dantzic.—The Russian Lieut. Gen. Kamensky, after having been beat on the 15th, retired under the fortifications of Weichselmunde. He remained there without venturing to undertake any thing; and he has been a spectator of the surrender of the place. When he perceived that they were erecting batteries, to burn his ships with red-hot balls, he embarked and retired. He has returned to Pillau —The fort of Weichselmunde still held out. Marshal Lefebvre summoned it on the 26th, and while they were regulating the terms of capitula: tion, the garrison advanced from the fort and surrendered. (To be continued.] ot

Printed by Cox and Baylis, No. 75, Great Queen Street, and published by R. Bagshaw, Brydges Street, Covent Garden, whereformer Nuai'e's lay be had seld also uy J. Budj.Crown and Mitre. Pali M*

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“ to the abolition of that system.” 1804–See Parl. Debates, Vol. II. p. 719 and 720,

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* The ballot is done away, and now, for the first time, the poor deceased ballot has found its panegyrists * ...: '......... I shall only remark that those who oppose this bill (the parish bill) must tour to the “ exploded system of crimps, and the equally exploded system of ballot.......". . . . . . . . . . . Those who

“have witnessed the distress and misery, to which the ballot has given rise, cannot, I conceive, be adverse

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- i. all those who have violated those

to Laws, against the repeal of which we heir such impudent and unprincipled clamours by the dirty Dean and others. A bill of indemnity was one of the very first acts of the late ministry; and, that was a bill, too, to excuse them from punishment, not for having given an insignificant order about the manner of carrying on a branch of trade; but, for having advised the king to admit a large number of foreign troops into the heart of our country. Those gentlemen, then, saw no objection to bills of indemnity. It was they, too, who were foremest in proposing the bill of indemnity for Pitt, who had lent, without interest, and in direct violation of the law, forty thousand pounds of the Public money to two members of the House of Commons. What, then, can they have to say against bills of indemnity Why nothing, only this present bill grew out of the dissolution of parliainent, and that dissolution took from them their majority. Of this long debate I shall notice, particularly, only two speeches; those of Lord Hawkes

bury, and Baron Erskine of Clackmanam,

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Mr. CANNING's Speech, in the House of Commons, 13th June,

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real authors of the necessity of the dissolution were the very persons, who had since so repeatedly and so acrimoniously inveighed against it; for when his majesty, in the legitimate exercise of his prerogative, thought proper to make the late change in his councils, the noble lords opposite him made an appeal to parliament, and brought the question to issue between themselves and their sovereign. What, then, was left to his majesty, but to appeal to the sense of his people, while the events which made that appeal necessary were still fresh in their recollection 2 How else was his royal prerogative to be supported. This is the fair, obvious, simple ground upon which the late dissolution rests, and the result has amply proved how well his majesty understood the disposition of his people in making that appeal. For never was their sense more clear, distinctly, and unequivocally expressed. No means were left untried by the opposers of government, to procure the fullest poss sible attendance of their adherents in parliament, at the beginning of the present session; yet the sentinent of the nation in favour of the prerogative, was pronounced in the fullest house that ever sat in deliberation, by the largest and most decided majority. Among their lordships, it met

with the same loyal and triumphant sit

port. Here, then, was the necessity and the propriety of the dissolution proved at orice in the most marked and forcible manner. He earnestly wished to let the question rest here, but it was impossible to pass over in silence the latter part of the noble baron's (Lord Grenville's) speech to which the former part only served as a stalking-horse. The deep regret he felt at some of the sentiments and expressions that fell from the noble baron, he was at a loss how to express; but

he was sure they must have made nearly

the same impression upon most of their

lordships. He was ready to believe that

the same feeling and sentiment pervaded F

“every class and description of the commu

nity, and that they were disposed to act with one heart and hand in support of the constitution against the attacks of the most formidable foe that they had ever to contend with, and now made more formidable by the influence of recent events. Then what could be the tendency of the noble baron's observations? What the effect they were calculated to produce But where was the practical good that

could result from them : Was it not well known how different were the opinions entertained respecting the chief topic upon which the noble baron had so widely, and in his mind, so unnecessarily expa“tiated Neither could he be ignorant how very generally the opinion of the country “ had been expressed upon that subject. Where then was the utility of the recom“ mendation which the noble baron had so anxiously urged 2 Was there in past experience, was there in any prospect before us, the slightest ground for considering us a divided people? Even in defence of the Catholics, and in mere justice to “ that respectable body of men, he would ask the noble baron, when were their erertions wanted, if the threat of danger required them to put them forth 2 Whatever the difference of opinion they may have entertained upon the other points, were they ever backward, when the appearance of a foreign enemy called for the zeal and activity of their services : Whatever the “ deprivations under which they suffer, have they no! always considered them as prosperity and lurury when compared with the promises and the hoons by which the enemy would endeavour to seduce them 2 * Then the representations made by the noble baron are unfair, of any description of men who have uniformly manifested such a spirit of loyalty and patriotism. It was unfair surely to describe their conduct and “ principles in a light that would justify him in calling them a divided people. Respecting our internal policy, there might perhaps be difference of opinion: with regard to the threats and attempts of a foreign enemy, we should always prove an united people, those who possessed “ least, vying with those who possessed “ most. The moment called for universal units of action, and under such circum“ stances as the present, he hoped to see all party spirit and animosity turn into zeal for the common defence.” Yes, my

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Lord Hawkesbury, and this hope of yours

has been uniformly expressed by all those

who have, by no matter what means, got

hold of the powers and emoluments of the country; and, I take it, the true interpretation of such hope is this; that, now that we are snugly fixed, now that the sun rises to our profit, now when it is the day of our harvest, let no cloud arise, let all go fairly and smoothly on. for all opposition, is so much against our gains. “Let us bury all “ party animosities,” say the INS. Yes, say the OUTS, with all our hearts; but, then, we must be INS first ; for it is quite unreasonable to suppose, that we shall cease to oppose you, while you detain from us that which (for the good of the country) we ought to enjoy. Only let them in, my lord, and they will cry for unanimity, and for the suppression of all party spirit as vehemently as your lordship now does; but, until they are in, they will certainly continue to act just as your lordship and your worthy colleagues acted while you were out. I am exceedingly glad to hear, from such authority, that there “is not the slightest grounds “ for considering us as a divided people," and especially, that the Irish Catholics “are “ never wanting in exertions, when the “ threat of danger requires them to put “ them forth." I say, I am exceedingly glad of this; because, I was afraid that this was not the case, when I saw introduced into parliament the sun-set and sun-rise bili for Ireland, and when I heard it positively asserted, that such a till was necessary. My fears upon this score were by no means lessened by an article, which appeared in the Coulier newspaper of the 22d of July, and which article I here insert. “ One of the

“ Dublin papers of the 17th, which arrived

“ yesterday, has inserted the following arti

cle, copied from the Limerick Chronicle: r & With feelings the most painful we lately heard of some irregularities com“ initted in the town of Tipperary, and “ with astonishment we found, that al“ though we obtained information of the “ facts through a friend, it was with the “ injunction not to disclose the circumstan“ ces, for that party spirit ran so high, that “ perhaps life would have been the forfeit ly the friend who made such disclosure. We could not of course divulge the contents of the communications to us on the subject, but now that several respectable and spirited magistrates and gentlemen in the neighbourhood have stepped forward and openly avowed that outrages have ex

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“ult, the Rev. Wm. Massy, jun. in the ex“ecution of his duty as a magistrate, was “ severely wounded by a stone thrown by “ sonne person unknown ; the following “ night his house was attacked, and several “ panes of glass broken : there are, how“ ever, rewards offered to the amount of “ nearly one thousand guicens, which form “ a fund for the purpose of bringing the de“linquents to justice, and it is hoped that proper eramples will be made of such disturbers of the public peace. But what “ was to be copected, when a tree of liberty “ or some other standard, was permitted to “ be erected and to continue in that town, “with emblems thereon, under pretence of “ some frivolous excuse, for several days, “ and that this token was a rallying point “ for the intemperate or disaffected, it has “ been stated to us, that at the distance of “ five or six miles from hence, the force of “ erecting, if it may now be called, a May“ bush, was it tended to take place a few days “ since. We are sorry to state that an “ affray has occurred in Fallinrobe, county “Mayo, between the Longford militia nnd a regiment of cavalry, quartered in that “town. Some lives (five, as far as our au“ thority goes) have been lost in this unfor“ tunate business. Some ridiculots reli“gious difference is understood to have been “ the origin of this affair.” This article did increase my apprehensions; but, perceiving that s ord Hawkesbury spoke of the future as well as of the past, and knowing that he must possess the best possible information upon the subject, my fears, of course, became hushed; and, I have no doubt, that Napoleon will, from his lordship's speech, derive a thorough conviction, that all his at . tempts to seduce the Irish, who, as his lord. ship says, are almost boiling over with lovsity, must prove abortive. This speech of Lord Hawkesbury must, in this way, do great good; for, as Napoleon well knows, that, numerous as his armies are, he can expect no success against a people, who, to a man, are united heart and hand against binn, he will not, of course, think of atticking any part of the kingdom, “the tonited kingdom,” after having read that speech. Upon the subject of the appeal, made “ to the sense of the heaple,” and of the proof of the present ministers having that sense on their side, which proof Lord Hawkssbury discovers so clearly in the late trium phant ma“jorities in both Houses of Parliament;” upon this subject we wiłł leave his lordship to be answered by Baron Erskine of Clickmanam. This noble Baron, who was, but a few months Lord Chancellor, and who has

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now a pension, for life, of £4,000 a year, said, that “no man could question the right “ of the king to dismiss his servants, or to dissolve the parliament. These were un“ doubted prerogatives, but they were “ granted for very distinct purposes. If his “ majesty saw reason to question the con“ duct of his servants, he might dismiss “ them ; or, if he saw reason to doubt the “ parliament, he might dissolve it, and take the sense of their constituents as to their “ conduct. Hut the law never intended “ that both of these prerogatives should be ‘‘ exercised at one and the same time, and “ with reference to each other. It was ne“ver in the contemplation of the constitution of this country, that parliament should “ be dissolved simply to uscommodate a change in administration. This would be “ to consider parliament not as a controul “ on the conduct of government, but as an appendage to it, to be dissolved and “ changed to suit the different aspects which “ it might assume. The unjustifiable mea“ sures which in the mean time might be “ adopted, would, in such a view of the “ case, be objects of little consideration to “ those by whom they were recommended. “Having, by the influence of the crown, got a parliament to their mind, they had only “ to begin their career by an Act of Indemnity for any measure which they might “ have taken against law, and without ne“ cessity. The arrival of such a period, he “ must consider as one pregnant with dan“ ger. It might be very well to TALK of “ appealing to the sense of the people; what “ would the community think, however, “ when informed that there are a number of toroughs at the disposal of the very persons who advised this dissolution; and “ that there are others, the property of, or insluenced by, a number of individuals, “ who, again, are under the influence of the crown 2 So that success is, in such an ap“ pct, nort to certain. But still farther, “ when they saw the seal of indemnity real

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“ly prepared for those who advised the

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