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BOUNDARY CONTROVERSY

BY

GROVER CLEVELAND

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS

PRINCETON

LONDON: HUMPHREY MILFORD

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

1913

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Copyright, 1913, by
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS

Published October, 1913

PRINCETON
UNIVERSITY

PRESS

PREFATORY NOTE

President Cleveland first visited Princeton at the time of the Sesquicentennial Celebration and made the chief address of that occasion on October 22, 1896. A few months later he retired from the Presidency and made Princeton his home for the remaining eleven years of his life. For the last seven of these years he served as Trustee of Princeton University and for the closing four years also acted as Chairman of the Committee on the Graduate School having special charge of the project for the residential Graduate College. He died on June 24, 1908, and was buried, as he desired, in his family plot in Princeton. By express provision of his will the only monument to mark his grave was to be the simple one which has already been erected.

Shortly after Mr. Cleveland came to live in Princeton it was proposed to found a Lectureship on Public Affairs in his honor. In the

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early summer of 1899 Mr. Henry Stafford Little, an alumnus of the University, endowed the lectureship and expressed the hope that Mr. Cleveland would consent to hold it, or at any rate to be the first incumbent. Mr. Cleveland was reluctant to undertake any new work at that time, but on receiving special word from Mr. Little, who was then critically ill, agreed to prepare an address for the next year.

On April 9 and 10, 1900, every seat in Alexander Hall was taken and there were throngs standing to hear his two addresses on “The Independence of the Executive." The next spring he lectured twice on "The Venezuelan Boundary Question.” For the next two years

there were no lectures, and in 1904 Mr. Cleveland read one lecture on “The Government in the Chicago Strike." He always had crowded audiences, both for himself and the grave importance of the questions he treated. He was heard with the closest attention and repeatedly welcomed with affectionate enthusiasm.

Seventeen years ago to the day since Mr. Cleveland first spoke in Princeton, his Prince

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