Political Disquisitions; Or, An Enquiry Into Public Errors, Defects, and Abuses: Illustrated By, and Established Upon Facts and Remarks, Extracted from a Variety of Authors, Ancient and Modern. Calculated to Draw the Timely Attention of Government and People, to a Due Consideration of the Necessity, and the Means, of Reforming Those Errors, Defects, and Abuses; of Restoring the Constitution, and Saving the State. By J. Burgh, Gentleman; Author of the Dignity of Human Nature, and Other Works. Volume the First [-third and Last].

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Robert Bell, in Third-Street; and William Woodhouse, in Front-Street, 1775
 

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Seite 100 - I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Christopher's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Seite 120 - ... without any warrant or authority from any power either divine or human, but in direct contradiction to the laws both of God and man : and therefore the law has justly fixed the crime and punishment of murder on them and on their seconds also.
Seite 248 - I fear we have more reason to complain of bad measures in our polity, and a general decay of virtue and morality among the people. In public, as well as private life, the only way to prevent being ridiculed or censured, is to avoid all ridiculous or wicked measures, and to pursue such only as are virtuous and worthy.
Seite 35 - An Act for the better preventing Thefts and Robberies ; and for regulating Places of public Entertainment, and punishing Persons keeping disorderly Houses," as relates to payments to 27 G.
Seite 283 - Upon a moderate computation there are near three millions at the difpofal of the crown. The civil lift amounts to near a million ; the collection of all taxes to another million, and the employments in the army and navy, together with ecclefiaftical preferments, to above a third million : An enormous fum, and what may fairly be computed to be more than a thirtieth part of the whole income and labour of the kingdom.
Seite 414 - Remember, O my friends, the laws, the rights, The generous plan of power deliver'd down, From age to age, by your renown'd forefathers, (So dearly bought, the price of so much blood) O let it never perish in your hands! But piously transmit it to your children.
Seite 335 - I called it forth, and drew into your service a hardy and intrepid race of men — men who, when left by your jealousy, became a prey to the artifices of your enemies, and had gone nigh to have overturned the state in the war before the last.
Seite 285 - Act, and the annual expedience of a standing army; and the vast acquisition of personal attachment, arising from the magnitude of the national debt, and the manner of levying those yearly millions that are appropriated to pay the interest; we shall find that the crown has, gradually and imperceptibly, gained almost as much in influence, as it has apparently lost in prerogative.
Seite 262 - ... cafe fome things have been received as evidence, which would not have been received in any court of judicature ; that precedents of this kind are naturally growing (as, we think, this goes beyond any other which has happened...
Seite 406 - Manchester had been insulted at Venice. That State had broken through their fundamental laws to content the Queen of Great Britain. How noble a picture, of Government, when a Monarch that can force another nation to infringe its constitution, dare not violate his own ! One...

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