A Digest of International Law: As Embodied in Diplomatic Discussions, Treaties and Other International Agreements, International Awards, the Decisions of Municipal Courts, and the Writings of Jurists ...

Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906 - 939 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Proposals of annexation
14
Control of immigration
15
France
20
Fundamental rights anil duties
23
5
25
The Holy See 18
39
Nature and functions 492
41
2 Military occupation 21
46
Penalty 1263
49
Chapter III
67
Recognition of belligerencyContinued
70
Acts falling short of recognition
77
H Doc 551
81
Argentine Republic 781
91
Ottoman Porte 1 Treaty of 1830 866
110
AustriaHungary 782
114
Duke of Aosta 1870
133
Central America 50
140
Santo Domingo 58
163
Nonamicable short of
164
Analogues of contraband
165
Prisoners of
166
Enemy character
167
Vessels
174
Rights and duties of ministers
182
A belligerent right 1266
188
Acts not prohibited
193
End of war 1163
197
Extraterritorial crime
200
Breach of blockade
204
Treatment of the wounded 1134
207
Coast warfare
210
Hayti 954
216
State aided and compulsory emigration
220
Landing of submarine cables
227
Neutral rights and duties
233
Mexico
237
Defenses
240
Laws of various countries
242
Chapter IV
255
Barbary powers 1 Early relations 783
256
Territorial expansion of United StatesContinued
257
Expressions of opinion 1313
259
Power to settle
264
Chapter VI
273
Enforcement of neutral duties
277
Real estate protocol 1874 868
286
Supremacy of territorial sovereign
291
Opinions of publicists
294
Internal development 91
303
4 Civil jurisdiction 265
308
Nationality of vessels
321
Joetze b United States
329
Germany 823
331
Great Britain
332
Report by Mr Dainese 1852
333
Ameliorations
350
ClaytonBulwer treaty
351
American routes and grants
368
Naturalization
377
On contracts and concessions 98
385
Conventional arrangements
390
Naturalization not retroactive
401
Nationality of married women
408
Cutting of cables 1176
409
Effect of judicial sentences
414
Double allegiance
426
Territorial expansion of United States
429
Privateers
441
Treaty of 1819
446
Damages
461
Commercial intercourse
463
Modes of expatriation
466
Seamen
484
4 Taxation 183
490
International American conferences 969
496
Exclusion of Chinese
511
Duration of passports
523
Treaty of peace 17823
531
Disabilities
541
Military service
547
Guano Islands
555
War measures
559
Extradition a national act
579
1 Negotiations 824
582
Treaties
589
Political offenses
604
Exchange of ratifications
609
Evidence
611
Chapter V
612
Whale fisheries 169
614
Expenses
620
The Mississippi
625
Prize money and bounty
633
Payment 1060
637
INTEROCEANIC COMMUNICATIONS
652
Relations with the Navy
656
Straits
658
Straits of Magellan
664
Switzerland
669
Treaty stipulations
678
Ceremonial
681
Classes and titles
696
Marginal
698
Chapter XXIII
699
3 Discussion as to Cuba 140
706
Algiers 784
716
Powers and duties
717
Shipping and seamen
725
Declarations of maritime
733
Power to make
734
Bristol Channel
739
3 Accretion 156
747
Agreements not submitted to the Senate
752
Tripoli
786
Tunis
787
Belgium
788
Bolivia
789
Brazil
790
Central America 1 Costa Rica
791
Honduras
792
Guatemala
793
Nicaragua
794
Salvador
795
Chile
796
China 1 Treaty of 1844
797
Treaties of 1858
798
Treaty of 1868
799
Immigration and other treaties 18801894
800
Taxes
801
Travel
803
Missionary privileges and protection
804
Purchase of land
805
Treaty ports and foreign settlements
806
Leases to European powers
807
Boxer movement 1 Siege and relief of legations
808
2 Negotiations for settlement
809
Practice of protection
810
Open door policy 1 The Hay agreement 811
811
2 AngloGerman agreement
812
Territorial integrity neutrality
813
Colombia
814
Congo
815
Corea
816
Denmark 817
817
Dominican Republic
818
XV Ecuador 819
819
1 Historical Bketch 826
826
2 Particular stipulations 827
827
MonroePinkney and cognate negotiations
828
Treaty of Ghent
829
Treaty of 1815
830
Naval forces on Great Lakes 1817
831
Fisheries convention 1818
832
Indemnity for slaves 1822
833
WebsterAshburton treaty
834
Oregon treaty
835
ClaytonBulvver treaty
836
Reciprocity treaty of 1854
837
Treaty of Washington 1871
839
Canadian relations
840
The Queens jubilee 841
841
Greece
842
Hayti
843
Italy
844
Japan 1 Early attempts to negotiate
845
Perrys successful mission
846
Harris treaties and Japanese embassy
847
Domestic disturbances
848
Affair of Shimonoseki
849
Convention of 1866 and treaty revision
850
Emancipation of Japan 851
851
Literia 1 Declarations of American policy
852
Treaty of 1862 Art VIII
853
Relations with Great Britain
854
Relations with France
855
Madagascar
856
Mexico 1 Relations 18251848
857
Treaty of GuadalupeHidalgo
858
Meailla and later treaties
859
Domestic disturbances intervention
860
Later relations
861
Zona Libra or Free Zone
862
Crossing of border by cattle
863
H Doc 551 v
865
Extradition treaty
869
Educational eleemosynary and religious institutions
870
Schools
871
Sale of books
872
Freedom of worship
873
Armenian difficulties
874
Various topics
875
Paraguay
876
Persia
877
Peru
878
Portugal
879
Russia
880
Samoan Islands
881
Siam
882
Treaty of October 27 1795
883
Treaty of February 22 1819
884
Convention of February 17 1834
885
Reciprocity agreement 1891
886
Treaty of December 10 1898
887
Caroline Islands
888
Sweden and Norway
889
Switzerland
890
Tahiti
891
Tonga
892
Uruguay
893
Venezuela
894
Zanzibar
895
Multipartite treaties
896
Political intervention 1 General principles
897
Policy of nonintervention 1 Declarations of policy
898
2 The French revolution
899
3 Spain and her colonies
900
4 Greek independence
901
5 Hungarian revolution
902
6 ChilePeruvian war
903
7 Sympathy with liberal political struggles 904
904
8 Hospitality to political refugees
905
5 The Republic of Cuba
910
1 By contract
918
Questions of asylum
924
Early expressions of American policy
927
Monroes message December 2 1823
936
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 370 - Marshal Serrano, President of the Provisional Government at Madrid, in his speech at the opening of the Constituent Cortes, referred to the revolution in Spain and the insurrection in Cuba in the following terms: 'The...

Bibliografische Informationen