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LIX. TO MR. FOLEY, AT PARIS.

York, July 13, 1765. MY DEAR SIR, I WROTE, some time in spring, to beg you would favour me with my account. I believe you was set out from Paris, and that Mr. Garrick brought the letter with him -- which possibly he gave you. In the hurry of your business you might forget the contents of it; and in the hurry of mine in town (though I called once) I could not get to see you. I decamp for Italy in September, and shall see your face at Paris, you may be sure

but I shall see it with more pleasure when I am out of debt, which is your own fault, for Becket has had money left in his hands for that purpose. Do send Mrs. Sterne her two last volumes of Tristram; they arrived with yours in Spring, and she complains she has not got them My best services to Mr. Panchaud. – I am busy composing two volumes of Sermons -- they will be printed in September, though I fear not time enough to bring them with me. Your name is amongst the list of a few of my honorary subscribers who subscribe for love. If you see Baron d'Holbach, and Diderot, present my respects to them

If the Baron wants any English books he will let me know, and I will bring them with me. Adieu, I am truly yours,

L. STERNE.

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1765.

London, October 7, DEAR SIR, It is a terrible thing to be in Paris without a perriwig on a man's head! In seven days from the date

la plus

of this, I should be in that case, unless

you
tell

your neighbour Madame Requiere to get her bon mari de me faire un peruque à bourse, au mieux c'est-à-dire une la plus extraordinaire la plus jolie gentille

et la plus

Mais qu'importe? j'ai l'honneur d'être grand critique et bien difficile encore dans les affaires de peruques and in one word, that he gets it done in five days after notice.

I beg pardon for this liberty, my dear friend, and for the trouble of forwarding this by the very next post. If

my friend Mr. F. is in Paris, my kind love to him, and respects to all others in sad haste

Yours truly,

L. STERNE.

I have paid into Mr. Becket's hands six hundred pounds, which you may draw upon at sight, according as either Mrs. Sterne or myself make it expedient.

LXI.

TO MR. PANCHAUD, AT PARIS.

Beau Point Voisin, November 7, 1765. DEAR SIR, I FORGOT to desire you to forward whatever letters came to your hand to your banker at Rome, to wait for me against I get there, as it is uncertain how long I may stay at Turin, &c.: at present I am held prisoner in this town by the sudden swelling of two pitiful rivulets from the snows melting on the Alps we cannot either advance to them, or retire again to Lyons – for how long the gentlemen who are my fellow-travellers, and myself, shall languish in this state of vexatious captivity, heaven and earth surely know; for it rains as if they were coming together to settle the matter. – I had an agreeable journey to Lyons, and a joyous time there; dining and supping every day at the commandant's Lord F. W. I left there, and about a dozen English. - If you see Lord Ossory, Lord William Gordon, and my friend Mr. Crawford, remember me to them if Wilkes is at Paris yet, I send him all kind wishes present my compliments as well as thanks to my good friend Miss P—, and believe me, dear Sir, with all truth, yours,

so that

L. STERNE.

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Turin, Nov. 15, 1765. DEAR SIR, AFTER many difficulties I have got here safe and sound – tho' eight days in passing the mountains of Savoy. I am stopped here for ten days by the whole country betwixt here and Milan being laid under water by continual rains but I am very happy, and have found my way into a dozen houses already Tomorrow I am to be presented to the King, and when that ceremony is over, I shall have my hands full of engagements - No English here but Sir James Macdonald, who meets with much respect, and Mr. Ogilby. We are altogether, and shall depart in peace together - My kind services to all, pray forward the inclosed Yours truly,

L. STERNE.

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Turin, Nov. 28, 1765. DEAR SIR, I am just leaving this place with Sir James Macdonald for Milan, &c. We have spent a joyous fortnight here, and met with all kinds of honours and with regret do we both bid adieu

but health on my side and good sense on his say 'tis better to be at Rome you say at Paris - but you put variety out of the question I entreat you to forward the inclosed to Mrs. Sterne My compliments to all friends, more particularly to those I most value (that includes Mr. T., if he is in Paris).

I am yours most truly,

L. STERNE.

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LXIV. TO THE SAME.

Florence, Dec. 18, 1765. DEAR SIR, I Have been a month passing the plains of Lombardy - stopping in my way at Milan, Parma, Placenza, and Bologna with weather as delicious as a kindly April in England, and have been three days in crossing a part of the Appennines covered with thick

Sad transition! I stay here three days to dine with our Plenipo Lords T-d and C-r, and in five days shall tread the Vatican, and be introduced to all the Saints in the Pantheon. I stay but fourteen days to pay these civilities, and then decamp for Naples. Pray send the inclosed to my wife, and Becket's letter to London.

Yours truly,

L. STERNE.

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and cry

Naples, Feb. 3, 1766. MY DEAR GIRL, Your letter, my Lydia, has made me both laugh

Sorry am I that you are both so afflicted with the ague, and by all means I wish you both to fly from Tours, because I remember it is situated between two rivers, la Loire, and le Cher which must occasion fogs, and damp unwholesome weather therefore for the same reason go not to Bourges en Bresse 'tis as vile a place for agues. I find myself infinitely better than I was -- and hope to have added at least ten years to my life by this journey to Italy -- the climate is heavenly, and I find new principles of health in me, which I have been long a stranger to

but trust me, my Lydia, I will find you out, whereever you are, in May. Therefore I beg you to direct to me at Belloni's at Rome, that I may have some idea where

you

will be then. The account you give me of Mrs. C-- is truly amiable, I shall ever honour her Mr. C. is a diverting companion

what he said of your little French admirer was truly droll the Marquis de - is an impostor, and not worthy of your acquaintance - he only pretended to know me to get introduced to your mother I desire you will get your mother to write to Mr. C. that I may discharge every debt, and then, my Lydia, if I live, the produce of my pen shall be yours if fate reserves me not that -- the humane and good, partly for thy father's sake, partly for thy own, will never abandon thee! If your mother's health will permit her to return with me to England your summers I will render as agreeable as

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