The Speeches of the Right Honourable Charles James Fox, in the House of Commons ...

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Longmans, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1815
 

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Seite 113 - Quidquid agunt homines, votum, timor, ira, voluptas, Gaudia, discursus, nostri est farrago libelli.
Seite 232 - ... the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of guilty or not guilty, upon the whole matter put in issue...
Seite 283 - That an humble address be presented to his Majesty, that he •will be graciously pleased to give directions that there be laid before this house...
Seite 181 - When that nameless thing which has been lately set up in France was described as "the most stupendous and glorious edifice of liberty which had been erected on the foundation of human integrity in any time or country...
Seite 12 - France are just the reverse of each other in almost every particular, and in the whole spirit of the transaction. With us it was the case of a legal monarch attempting arbitrary power ; in France it is the case of an arbitrary monarch, beginning, from whatever cause, to legalize his authority.
Seite 393 - Act, such person shall be at liberty to make his complaint thereof by appeal to the Justices of the Peace at the next general or quarter sessions of the Peace to be held for the county, riding, division, or place wherein the cause of such complaint shall arise, such appellant first giving to such Justices ten days...
Seite 232 - An Act to remove Doubts respecting the Functions of Juries in Cases of Libel. [AD 1792.] WHEREAS doubts have arisen whether on the trial of an indictment or information for the making or publishing any libel, where an issue or issues are joined between the king and the defendant or defendants, on the plea of not guilty pleaded, it be competent to the jury impanelled to try the same to give their verdict upon the whole matter in issue...
Seite 389 - Ye horrid towers, the abode of broken hearts ; Ye dungeons, and ye cages of despair, That monarchs have supplied from age to age With music, such as suits their sovereign ears, The sighs and groans of miserable men ! There's not an English heart that would not leap To hear that ye were fallen at last; to know That e'en our enemies, so oft employ'd In forging chains for us, themselves were free.
Seite 7 - Ramillies or Blenheims could never have done it. Were we absolute conquerors, and France to lie prostrate at our feet, we should be ashamed to send a commission to settle their affairs, which could impose so hard a law upon the French, and so destructive of all their consequence as a nation, as that they had imposed on themselves.
Seite 9 - When they had done this, they instantly, with the most atrocious perfidy and breach of all faith among men, laid the axe to the root of all property, and consequently or all national prosperity, by the principles they established, and the example they set, in confiscating all the possessions of the church. They made and recorded a sort of institute and digest of anarchy, called the rights of man...

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