The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, Band 5

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Published for the proprietor, 1842
 

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Seite 112 - Elijah took twelve stones, according to the number of the tribes of the sons of Jacob, unto whom the word of the LORD came, saying, Israel shall be thy name...
Seite 44 - It appeared to me like entering a city of giants, who, after a long conflict, were all destroyed, leaving the ruins of their various temples as the only proofs of their former existence.
Seite 254 - ... are so small as to be easily obstructed or choked. The water enters the buckets in the direction of the tangent to the last element of the guide curves, which is a tangent to the first element of the curved buckets. The water ought to press steadily against the curved buckets, entering them without shock or impulse, and quitting them without velocity, in order to obtain the greatest useful effect, otherwise a portion of the water's power must be wasted or expended without producing useful effect...
Seite 12 - The effect of this achievement is by no means easily to be .described or foreseen. Even the Americans, with all their reputation as a self-possessed and considering people, have displayed unwonted raptures and antics on occasion of the first arrival of the Sirius and Great Western at New York — quite as much so as our Bristol neighbours on their return ; and we are not sure that either party is to be blamed for it.
Seite 166 - Why the ore required, or why the iron carried away any of the carbon of the fuel ? " — Dr. Faraday stated, that the ore being essentially a carbonate of iron, the first action of heat, either in the mine kilns or in the furnace, was to draw off the carbonic acid and leave an oxide of iron, and then the further action of the fuel (besides sustaining a high temperature) was to abstract the oxygen of the oxide, and so to reduce the iron to the metallic state, after which a still further portion of...
Seite 121 - ... was to that employed for their own comfort in either house of Parliament. The engineers of Manchester do not, like those of the metropolis, trust for a sufficient supply of fresh air into any crowded hall, to currents physically created in the atmosphere by the difference of temperature excited by chimney draughts ; because they know them to be ineffectual to remove with requisite rapidity the dense carbonic acid gas generated by many hundred powerful lungs. The factory plan is to extract the...
Seite 123 - Allusion is made to a proposed junction canal between the rivers Boyle and Shannon, which may be considered as an extension of the Ulster Canal westward, effecting a junction between all the navigations of Ireland. By its means the produce of the town of Boyle, and the agricultural district around it, would be conveyed directly by steam to Belfast and Newry. At the time of this communication, the Ulster Canal was rapidly advancing towards completion ; it was navigable up to Clones, a distance of...
Seite 229 - As the pumping progressed, the most careful measurements were taken of the level at which the water stood in the various shafts and boreholes, and I was soon much surprised to find how slightly the depression of the water-level in the one shaft influenced that of the other, notwithstanding a free communication existed between them through the medium of the sand, which was very coarse and open. It then occurred to me that the resistance which the water encountered in its passage through the sand to...
Seite 80 - From the remains of the works of the ancients the modern arts were revived, and it is by their means that they must be restored a second time. However it may mortify our vanity, we must be forced to allow them our masters ; and we may venture to prophesy, that when they shall cease to be studied, arts will no longer flourish, and we shall again relapse into barbarism.
Seite 187 - The other case occurred during a storm in the year 1840, when the sea door of the Eddystone Lighthouse was forced outwards, and its strong iron bolts and hinges broken by the atmospheric pressure from within. In this instance, he conceived that the sweep of the vast body of water in motion round the lighthouse, had created a partial and momentary, though effectual, vacuum, and thus enabled the atmospheric pressure within the building, to act upon the only yielding part of the structure.

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