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Not to public speakers alone, however, is the study of Elo. eution necessary. In a country where literature furnishes not only the most delightful occupation to the solitary student, but a favourite entertainment to the social circle, the art of reading with propriety and elegance forms an essential part of a polite education. While the splendid productions of genius, which are constantly issuing from the British press, and which diffuse an unexampled lustre over our age and country, afford the most refined pleasure to polished society, the power of reading them with due effect, must necessarily confer no small degree of disa tinction. Nor is this to be valued merely as an exterior accomplishment. Here the ear and the understanding afford mutual aid ; and as he alone who can duly appreciate the beauties of his author, can develope them by a judicious and graceful utterance; so he who can read them best, will have the fullest enjoyment of their various charms.

So generally is this now understood, that Elocution is daily attracting more of the general attention. Anxious to facilitate the acquisition of so important an accomplishment, the compiler of this volume selected, a few years since, the rules which it contains, and the extracts by which these rules are exemplified. The very extensive and rapid circulation of the two former editions, afford him a double gratification,—as a proof, that his labours have been found conducive to the end which he had in view, and as a satisfactory indication of a growing attention to this elegant art.

For the use of junior classes, he had previously published the English Learner, the success of which has been fully commen. surate with that of the Principles of Elocution ; to which, indeed, it form a natural and proper introduction. He has lately completed his plan by the publication of his Rhetorical Exercises, for the use of those students who have gone through the Principles of Elocution, and are thus prepared for the higher department of the art. These books, he would gladly flatter himself, will be found of peculiar utility to both teachers and pupils ; and if they contribute, in any degree, to disseminate among ingenuous youth an ardour for this pleasing and useful study, they will have fully answered his fondest hopes.

Edinburgh, Manorisihanover Street,

7

Page

4. The Interview of Rasselas, &c. with the Hermit, 89

5. On the Improvement of Time,

91

6. The Hill of Science,

93

7. Patience Recommended,

8. The Planetary and Terrestrial Worlds,

96

9. The Italian Opera,

98

10. *Westminster Abbey,

101

11. On Consistency in Behaviour,

103

12. Interview between an Old Major and a Young Officer, 105

13. On Religion,

106

14. Remarks on the Swiftness of Time,

107

15. On Public Preaching,

109

16. How a Modern Lady of Fashion Disposes of her Time, 110

17. On Pronunciation, or Delivery,

113

18. Discontent, the common Lot of all Mankind,

114

19. The Funeral of Mr Betterton,

117

20 *The Folly of misspending Time,

119

21. The Vision of Sir Isaac Bickerstaff,

120

22. Youth and Old Age,

122

23. The Poor weep unheeded,

123

24. The Story of a Disabled Soldier,

124

25. The Business and Qualifications of a Poet,

128

26. Remarks on some of the best Poets,

130

27. On the Iliad of Homer,

133

28. On the Odyssey of Homer,

134

29. On the Beauties of Virgil,

134

30. *On the comparative Merit of Homer and Virgil, 136

31. On Human Grandeur,

137

32. Ethelgar. A Saxon Poem,

138

33. Kenrick. Translated from the Saxon,

141

34. Hard Words Defended,

143

35. The Difficulty of Conquering Habit,

146.

36. On Cruelty to inferior Animals,

147

37. Effects of Sympathy in the Distresses of Others, 149

38. On the Love of Life,

150

39. On the Dignity of Human Nature,

151

40. *Fame, a commendable Passion,

152

41. The present Life to be considered only as it may

conduce to the Happiness of a future one,

154

42. Luxury and Avarice,

156

43. The Impudent and the Absurd,

159

44. On Grieving for the Dead,

160

45. On Remorse,

162

46. On the Increased Love of Life with Age,

164

47. Asem. An Eastern Tale,

165
195

Page
48. On the English Clergy, and Popular Preachers, 167

49. On Universal Benevolence,

169

50. On the Advantages of a well cultivated Mind,

173

51. On the Formation of Language,

176

52. On the Sublime in Writing,

179

HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS.

1. Our natural Fondness for History, and its true Use, 183

2. On Biography,

184

3. Character of Queen Elizabeth,

186

4. *Character of Mr Pitt,

188

5. The Siege of Quebec, and the Death of General Wolfe, 189

6. The Character of Julius Cæsar,

191

7. The Character of Cato,

192

8. A Comparison of Cæsar with Cato,

193

9. The Character of Hannibal,

194

10. The Character of Mary Queen of Scots,

PATHETIC PIECES.

1. Reyno and Alpin,

197

2. On Military Glory,

198

3. The Dead Ass,

199

4. Maria.- Part I.

201

5. Maria.- Part II.

203

SPECIMENS OF PULPIT ELOQUENCE.

1. True Pleasure Defined,

205

2. *Religion never to be treated with Levity,

206

3. The Condition of the Wicked,

207

4. On Charity,

207

5. Religious Knowledge, a Source of Consolation, 209

6. On the Enlargement of our Intellectual Powers, 211

7. On a Future State,

213

8. On the Works and Attributes of the Almighty, 214

9. On the Beauties of Nature,

215

10. Obedience to the Commandments of God will be rewarded,216

11. The Birth of the Saviour announced,

217

12. *The Truth frees us from the Slavish Fear of Death, 218

13. On the Hope of Immortality,

219

14. The Departed Spirits of the Just are Spectators of our

Conduct on Earth,

220

15. The Death of Christ,

220

16. On Continuance in well-doing,

222

17. On the General Fast, 1803,

223

18. The Promises of Religion to the Young,

225

19. On Autumn,

227

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