Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Page

6. The Good Preacher and the Clerical Coscomb,

345

7. Cardinal Wolsey's Speech to Cromwell,

346

8. Character of Teribazus,

346

9. A Seatonian Prize Poem,

348

10. *On the Importance of Time to Man,

350

11. On Death,

351

12. On the Being of a God,

353

13. On the Wonders of Redemption,

354

DIALOGUES.

1. *Lochiel's Warning,

356

2. Vanoc and Valens,

358

3. Corin and Emma's Hospitality,

361

4. Coriolanus and Aufidius,

363

5. Lady Randolph and Douglas,

366

6. Alberto's Exculpation,

368

7. Alfred and Devon,

371

8. The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius,

372

9. Orestes delivering his Embassy to Pyrrhus,

376

10. Glenalvon and Norval,

378

11. Hector and Andromache,

381

12, Cato's Senate,

382

SPEECHES.

1. *Speech of Henry V. at the Siege of Harfleur, 385

2. Zanga's Reasons for hating Alonzo,

385

3. Marcellus's Speech to the Mob,

386

4. Richmond encouraging his Soldiers,

387

5. Douglas's Account of Himself,

387

6. Henry V's Speech at Agincourt,

388

7. Speech of Edward the Black Prince,

389

8. How Douglas learned the Art of War,

390

9. Othello's Apology,

392

10. *Cassius against Cæsar,

393

11. Alfred's Address to the Saxon Troops,

395

12. Leonidas offering to defend the Pass of Thermopylæ, 396

13. Leonidas's Speech to his Queen,

396

14. Oration in Praise of Coriolanus,

397

15. The Old English Lion,

398

16. The Passions,

399

17. Alexander's Feast,

402

405

18. Speech of Rolla,

406

19. Brutus's Harangue on the Death of Cæsar,

20. Osmond's Dream,

407

409

21. Hamlet's Advice to the Players,

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Diferent Methods by which the Principles and Lessons

may be successfully taught.

In order to pronounce correctly, a paragraph or more of the initial and terminational sounds should be carefully read each day, or at any other stated interval. A previous knowledge of the Key to the Sounds (page 17.) is, however, indispensably necessary.

Before attempting to read the examples on inflections, a thorough knowledge of the two slides, or inflections of voice (page 35.) must Be obtained. Without a very accurate knowledge of these two slides of the voice, no graceful progress in reading can possibly be made.

The Table of inflections contains thirty lines. After being able to exemplify the slides in the first column, proceed to acquire a like knowledge of the second. This being done, endeavour to read the table backwards; that is, read the 16th line, and then the 1st; the 17th, and then the 2d; the 18th, and then the 3d, &c. ; in the last place, read the table across; that is, read the 1st line, and then the 16th ; the 2d, and then the 17th ; the 3d, and then the 18th, &c.

Under the heads of Intlections, Accent, Emphasis, and Pauses, the Rules are printed in italics : these, it is understood, will be either at. tentively studied, or committed to memory by the Pupil, according to circumstances. A single rule may be given out each day as an exercise; the examples under which being read the day following.

The notes and examples under them may be read by the Student immediately after the rules to which they belong ; but by those less advanced, they may be entirely passed over, ani not read till a perfect knowledge has been attained of what is of more importance.

In reading the Lessons, the principles should be gradually reduced to practice. Words that require the rising inflection, may, by the Pupil, be marked with a pencil with the acute accent; and such as require the falling inflection, with the grave accent. Emphatical words may be marked by drawing a straight line over them ; and where a rhetorical pause is admissible, a mark such as a comma may be inserted after the word.

If this process should be thought too tedious, the Pupil may be requested to mark (while the Teacher is reading the Lesson) only the principal inflections: it being always understood, however, that the Pupil has acquired a knowledge of the different slides, and degrees of force of the voice.

The following Rule, to which, though there are many exceptions, may perhaps be of some advantage; the knowledge of it, at least, is easily acquired.

The falling inflection almost always takes place at a period, very often at a colon, and frequently at a semicolon ; at the comma immediately preceding either of these points, the rising inflection commonly takes place. When this rule does not hold good, the Teacher can easily point out the exceptions to it.

« ZurückWeiter »