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the head of the sheets, and no names at|cause, in the first place, I am naturally the head of the first sheet; and that he to suppose that the petitioners had their wished there to be a standing order of reasons for not making them the chanthe House for members to put their nels of their petitions ; and, in the next names at the head of petitions for these place, because those gentlemen will reasons. Mr. Wilks, the Member for always have an opportunity of hearing Boston, objected to any such regulation, the petition read, and of reading it, if and said that it was one further step to they please, as soon as it is out of narrow the right of petition. Mr. O'Con- my hands. It is not for me to judge nell saw no harna in the order about of the motives of the petitioners, or of putting the name of the Member ; but the grounds of their conduct, . It is fór could see no reason for rejecting a peti- me to obey their will in presenting their tion on account of its being printed; petitions, in sending which to me throy and, as to lithograpk, that objection had do me very great honour.

I shall now never been made before. I make no insert the list. commentary, but here merely state the facts, having opportunities enough to 1. From the Mayor, Aldermen, Commake comments whenever I inay choose. mon Council, Burgesses and other My readers will recollect, however; that electors and rate-payers of the the objection to printed petitions was “ town and borough of Kidnelly in first started and enforced to prevent the county of Carmarthen,

praying Major Cartwright's petitions from being that the Irish Coercion Bil may presented in 1816 and 1817, when a not pass, and praying that the real million and a half of people petitioned cause of it may cease, namely, the for Parliamentary reform. That is all cruel exaction of tithes. that I shall add upon the subject at 2. From the electors, rate-payers, and present.

inhabitants of the Borough of The new regulations prevent us from

Carmarthen. The same prayer. presenting petitions at any time that we s. From the electors and rate-payers of like. Our names are on a list, and we the town and borough of Saint are called on in our turn. I have at. Clears and Pentre Llanfihangel, in tended now several mid-day sittings, the county of Carmarthen. The and have not been able to bring forward same prayer. my petitions. I have thirty-five now in 4. From Preston, in Lancashire, agreed my hands, with, I should suppose, fifty to at a public meeting called by the thousand names signed to them; and Mayor, praying that their Irish those most numerously signed, pray

that brethren may not be subjected to a the military court bill may not pass into military law. a law. I will here give a list of them, 5. From the City of Norwich, praying that the petitioners may see that I have for repeal of taxes, and that no not neglected' my duty with regard to more blood may be shed to compel them, a duty which I deem the most payment of tithes in Ireland. sacred of all. The list is as follows; 6. From the parish of Callan, county and the petitioners may be assured that of Mayo, praying

that the Coercion I will do all the justice in my power to

Bill

may not pass. their several petitions ; taking care, at 7. From the parish of Muhar, in the the same time, not to be unnecessarily county of Kerry, praying that they tedious, because that can do no good; may not be degraded by subjection and trifling efforts to annoy your oppo

to military law. nents only tend to your own discredit. 8. From the inhabitants of the Tower Some Members, finding that I had peti- Hamlets, praying that the Coercion tions from places which they represent,

Bill for Ireland may not pass into have requested to see the petitions before

a law. being presented, which I have thought 9. From the parish of Kilvine, in the it

my duty not to comply with. Be- county of Mayo, beseeching the

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House not to pass the horrible of the borough of Manchester, setbill, which is to enable a few.mili. ting forth the numerous evils-attary officers to transport them for tending upon making laws at midlife.

night, and praying the House to 10. From the city of Ely, for the repeal alter its present practice as to this of the assessed taxes.'

matter. 11. From Chipping-Norton, for the re- 23. From the undersigned inhabitants

peal of some of the present taxes, of the city of Norwich, against and for the substitution of a regu- white slavery; setting forth the lated property-tax.

state of degradation and misery 12. The petition of Timothy Hutt and : in which the working classes now

Mark Anthony Johnson, praying are ; setting forth the injustice of for a repeal of taxes, and against paying in gold the interest of a coercive measures for Ireland.

debt contracted in paper; setting 13. The petition of James Hamson, of forth the injustice they have en

Thorne-Falcon, complaining of the dured from law's passed by the

dreadful pressure of local taxation. aristocracy and its nominees, 'set14. The petition of the undersigned in- ting forth the injustice of the tithe

habitants of Manchester, praying system ; praying for that equitable for the repeal of the taxes on know- adjustment for which they prayed ledge.

in the year 1823 ; praying that a 15. Petition of James Dunn, Esq., of bill may be passed to give protec· Gray's-inn, barrister-at-law, com- tion to electors at future elections;

plaining of certain proceedings of praying for a repeal of the tates certain magistrates.

which most oppress the working 16. Petition of William Blayland of people, and praying that no sup

Leamington, against the longer ex- plies may be granted until these istence of tithes.

measures be adopted. 17. From Joseph Townshend Holman, 84. From the inhabitants of Eccleshill,

of Gray's-inn, praying that a law in the county of York, praying the may be passed to authorise the de. House to pass the Ten-hour Facfendants in cases of libel, to pro

duce the truth in justification. 25. From the frame-work knitters, of 18. Petition of R. Webb, of Harcourt- Basford, in the county of Notting

street, Marybonne, praying for a ham, praying the House to take repeal of all the taxes on know- their hard case into its consideraledge.

tion, and to afford them relief by 19. Petition from the borough of Ly. those means which the petitioners

mington, in the county of Hants, very respectfully beg leave to be
praying for the adoption of the permitted to suggest.
ballot at elections.

26. From the working classes and others 20. From the society of Free-Inquirers, of the borough of Great Yarmouth,

in the parish of Marybunne, pray- in the county of Norfolk, describing ing the House to adopt measures the horror they feel at seeing their so that all persecution for religious Irish fellow-subjects subjected to opinions may cease, and that it trial before red-coat courts of jus. will take into its consideration the tice, and praying the House not to hard case of the Rev. Robert

pass any bill having that object in Taylor.

view. 21. A pétition from the same, praying the 27. From the members of the Political

House to adopt measures to put an Uvion of the borough of Chitheroe, end to all religious persecutions, in the county of Lancaster, praying and to take into its consideration that their Irish brethren may not

the hard case of Richard Carlile. be subjected to a government 22. From the undersigned inhabitants wholly unknown to the constitu

tory Bill.

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intention, and also praying the House to repeal the odious and unjust Corn

MR. FINN. .: Bills

Ox Wednesday, at the noon sitting in 28. From the inhabitants of Spitalfields, the House of Commons, Mr. Roebuck,

praying that the Martial-Law Bill in presenting a petition from Bath, for for. Ireland may not pass, and pray- which he is a member, made an, admiing the House to adopt just mea- rable speech in support of the prayer of

owards those who have pro- the petitioners, against the Military posed it.

Courts of Justice Bill for Ireland. He 3. 29. From James Peters, of the city of spoke of that bill in the manner that

Bristol, against the proposed bill became him as the representative of a

for new laws relating to the keep- city inhabited by English people; but, ing of the Lord's day.

in the heat of his indignation he ex30. From the inhabitants, electors, and pressed his opinion that, if that bill were

rate-payers in the borough of Llan- passed, the members from Ireland ought nelly, praying the House to reject to quit the House with disdain, and not the horrid bill for coercing Ireland, enter it again. After Mr. Roebuck, and for compelling the people of Mr. Finn rose, . and said, that he fully that ill-treated country to pay participated in all the indignant feelings

tithes at the point of the bayonet. so well expressed by the hon. Member : 31. From the council

, associates, and for Bath ; " but,” said he, “so far from friends of the Northern Political " quitting the House, we, the members Union, in public meeting assem- “ for Ireland, will remain still more bled, praying for the enactment of " firmly at our posts : we will be conthe vote by ballot at elections for “stant in our endeavours to relieve the members to serve in Parliament ; " people of England from the enormous and for a repeal of the unjust and " burden of taxes which they bear; to odious Septennial Act.

sweep away the sinecures and the un. 132, From the inhabitants the Hamlet" merited pensions, and to remove all

of Sea, in Lancashire, praying the “ their various oppressions. The symHouse not to pass the Martial Law |-- pathy which they have shown for us, Bill for Ireland, and praying it to will make us everlastingly grateful to impeach those who had dared to them ; that aristocracy who oppress propose it.

us, oppress them also, we will teach 5.333. From John Marlin, of Canterbury, our countrymen that they can never

complaining of the abuses of the “hope for redress, except by making law by attorneys, and praying for “common cause with the people of an alteration and a simplifying of " England against that all-devouring the law, in order to render justice “ aristocracy. We will be unremitting more cheap.

“ in our efforts ; in our attendance herei 34. From Thomas Parkins, complain" and in the discharge of all our duties

ing of the conduct of certain ma- as representatives of the English as o 92 gistrates, praying for redress. - well as of the Irish people.” 35. From the undersigned, in behalf I was never more gratified than at

of themselves and others, assem- the hearing of this speech.
bled by public advertisement, at short, but it was sensible, spirited, and
White Conduit House, on Tuesday, it produced the suitable effect in the
the nineteenth of March, 1833, House, as it will do throughout the
against the Martial-law Bill for country. Mr. Finn, no doubt, spoke
Ireland.

the sentiments of the other Irish. mem-
bers; and if they act up to that speech,
they will do ten thousand times' greater
good to England than has been done by
all its own members put together, for a
great many years past.

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RESULT OF A SURVEY (taken in January, 1833), of the Condition

Lancashire, and Two in Yorkshire, mostly employed

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From this Table it appears, that in these Thirty-five Townships, the population is 203,349. the whole. The number out of work in the families visited, is 2,287. The number unfit for the families visited earn are £4,447 185. This sum will give for each of those who work a of 1s..9fd. The rent paid by the families visited is, per annum, £32,693 17s. 5d.- This sumn implements, will be an average for each individual of, at least, 3fid. a-week; and this, with the food and clothing for each individual for a week, Is. 31d. The whole parish relief given weekly for a day, for food and clothing, from both wages and relief, is 2{d.

* The population of Oddleston not being known is assumed.

of the Poor in Thirty-three Townships of the Manufacturing District in in the manufacture of Cotton, of Woollen, and of Silk.

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The families visited, are 8362. -The persons in these families, 49,294, being nearly one-fourth of work in the same is 23,060. The number of workers is 23,941.-The total weekly wages which gives an averas 38. 8 d. And for each of the whole number of persons visited, a' weekly average average

of 3d a-week for each individual in the , average rent of 3d. being dedụcted from 1s. 9£d. the average income of each individual, leaves for to die families visited is £139 78.g.or, for each, of a penny..And the average income of each

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