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ing). The Whigs, he said, stated that sent at the execution of the last of this measure was rendered necessary eleven who suffered for that murder. by the fearful prevalence of crime in In the first place, Sir Robert Peel was Ireland. But he askerl, did not distress, wrong in stating the murder to have the cause of those crimes, also exist? been committed in Clare ; it took place By the legislative union the manufac- in Limerick. (Hear). The high-sheriff tures of that country were destroyed, of the county being a relative of his, and the whole of its population thrown enabled him to be near the gallows. upon the land; the absentee landlords The facts of the case were these : in the raised their rents, and the parsons raise'l village of Palace Kenrick, in Limerick, their tithes, the consequence of which there lived a wan and his wife of the was, that thousands of Irish labourers name of Dillane. Their cottage was a came into this country to cheapen la- most miserable one; but by degrees it bour, and to reduce the wages of those was improved: The thatch roof became who were already too low. Those seated. A great scarcity prevailed in who remained behind were reduced al- that part of Ireland, and a great many most to a state of starvation. Hence threatening letters were sent to the the dreadful outrages which unfortu- neighbouring farmers. Several persons nately prevailed, and which had been were taken up for those offences and greatly increased by the deceitful con- convicted on the evidence of Dillane and duct of the Governinent, who, after his wife. The consequence was that they had promised a redress of all ex- Dillane was obliged to leave that part isting grievances, had brought forward of the country, his wife and children a measure far exceeding in cruelty and still living in the cottage unmolested. injustice any one ever brought forwarı At the end of seven months, Dillane reby the infamous Castlereagh. The turned to Palace Kenrick, where he hon. and learned Gentleman concluded, lived quietly for some time. On the by declaring his intention to visit at the day of the murder, he and his wife went close of the parliamentary session every to a neighbouring fair, where they inborough in England, and detail the ca- sultingly displayed the blood-money in Jantities which had been inflicted on the presence of those whose sons had Ireland. He would then return to his suffered. In the evening the men, renative land, to brave the dagger and turning from the fair, greatly excited by the dungeon. Mr. O'Connell sat down the conduct of Dillane, knocked at the amidst tremendous cheering; and short- cottage door, called himn out, and mur. ly afterwards left the meeting, to attend dered him in the high road. After to bis parliamentary duties.

having perpetrated this deed, they enSome interruption had been experi- tered the cottage, and murdered the enced during part of Mr. O'Connell's wife. The right hon. baronet had stated speech, from a little knot of persons on that the child recognised the murderers the platform. They were now in- by the light of a blazing turf, hastily vited to come forward, but declined placed on the hearth. Now, as to the doing so.

probability of this story. It was adMr. Powell and Mr. Goode then mitted that the family had been some addressed the meeting in support of the time in bed, previous to the perpetration resolution.

of the murder. It was not probable, Mr. GRADY wished to wipe off a stain therefore, that there could have been that had been cast on the Irish pation inuch fire upon the hearth, and everyby that Juseph Surface of real life-that body who knew the nature of turf, must cunning of statesmen-Sir Robert knows that a piece of this material Peel. He alluded to the tale with which hastily thrown upon the embers could Sir Robert Peel was said to have elec- not have created a light sufficient to entrified the House of Commons, relative able any one in a room to discern and to a murder that had been committed identify the features of eight or ten in Ireland. He (Mr. Grady) was pre- persons; forty-seven men were apprecomplain of those dreadful measures Why not apply the measure to Ireland ? about to be introduced under the sanc- They would not only put an end to the tion of a refornsed House of Commons, outrages, but to the cause of them, and a Government professing to be the namely, distress. (Cheers). The Whigs friends of liberty all over the world. promised relief to the Irish people ; but, He had asked the House, before suffer-like the witches in Macbeth, they kept ing that dreadful measure to become the word of promise to the ear and law, that it would instilute an inquiry broke it to the hope. He has expected into the actual state of his country. real relief for Ireland, but he had been This was denied; they would not waste miserably disappointed; for out of their even the short space of one fortnight; boasted 'reform of the church of that and all the evidence they had submit country, only 80,000l. was the good to ted to Parliament was passages selected be derived by the Catholic population. from anonymous letters. He should And in return for that, they would take like to have seen who wrote those let- away that palladium of the rights of ters, or, at all events, lie should like to Englishmen and Irishmen-their boasted know by whom they were signed. From trial by jury. A reformed House of Comsuch evidence as this, without knowing mons had suffered such a measure to be whether the letters were genuine or not, read twice, and thus placed the liberties Ministers come forward and demand of his countrymen in the hands of a the implicit confidence of Parliament in pair of whiskered puppies, vomited from carrying their despotism. The dis- the hells of St. James's-street, and far turbances, he freely admitted, prevailed inore skilled in debauchery than in solin a frightful degree in four of the Irish diery, and one superior officer. All of counties, and no one was more desirous thein men who might be cashiered tothan he was to put an end to them. He inorrow, without any reason being given was certain he was more sincere in his for it. This was not, this could not be wish to put an end to them than his England, the land of the brave, and the Majesty's Ministers. He trusted he hoine of the free? It was, it must be should live to see the day when Earl Algiers. The hon. and learned Member Grey would be impeached for the mea- then proceeded to describe the frightful sures he was about to introduce into Ire- atrocities which might be, and which land. When Earl Grey and his Whig col- had been committed, in Ireland, under leagues came into office, what was the miltary law, particularly referring to state of England ? In nineteen counties the statements made by Lord Cloncurry far greater disturbances prevailed than in the House of Lords; and then ex. at present prevailed in any part of Ire- amined in detail the various clauses of land. In those counties large bodies of the bill, which he denounced in very men went from farın to farm breaking strong terms, as a gross, unjustifiable, the machinery, and then extorting money and daring violation of the rights of the from those whom they had already in- subject. In speaking of the clause em. jured. The night was rendered still powering the military to make domicimore dreadful by the fires which pre- liary visits, the hon. Member said, an vailed. Since, that time Bristol had English blacksmith in the days of the been sacked; the castle of one of Eng-imbecile Richard the Second, struck to land's proudest lords had been taken by the ground a tax-gatherer who had storm and destroyed; and yet Ministers laid indecent hands on his daughter; did not dare to suspend trial by jury, or thousands of Englishmen applauded the the Habeas Corpus Act. No: they deed, and flew to arms; and although knew better ; they well knew that En-their leader was treacherously murdered, glishmen were composed of sterner they obtained from that voluptuous ty. stuff than to submit to such treatment, rant a reciress of their grievances. He They sent special commissions into the trusted there were men in Ireland who counties, and they at the same time would not suffer their daughters to be raised the agricultural labourers' wages. insulted with impunity. (Great cheering). The Whigs, he said, stated that sent at the execution of the last of this measure was rendered necessary eleven who suffered for that murder. by the fearful prevalence of crime in In the first place, Sir Robert Peel was Ireland. But he askerl, did not distress, wrong in stating the murder to have the cause of those crimes, also exist? been committed in Clare ; it took place By the legislative union the manufac- in Limerick. (Hear). The high-sheriff tures of that country were destroyed, of the county being a relative of his, and the whole of its population thrown enabled him to be near the gallows. upon the land; the absentee landlords The facts of the case were these : in the raised their rents, and the parsons raise'l village of Palace Kenrick, in Limerick, their tithes, the consequence of which there lived a man and his wife of the was, that thousands of Irish labourers name of Dillane. Their cottage was a came into this country to cheapen la- most miserable one; but by degrees it bour, and to reduce the wages of those was improved: The thatch roof became who were already too low. Those seated. A great scarcity prevailed in who remained behind were reduced al- that part of Ireland, and a great many most to a state of starvation. Hence threatening letters were sent to the the dreadful outrages which unfortu- neighbouring farmers. Several persons nately prevailed, and which had been were taken up for those offences and greatly increased by the deceitful con- convicted on the evidence of Dillane and duct of the Governinent, who, after his wife. The consequence was that they had promised a redress of all ex- Dillane was obliged to leave that part isting grievances, had brought forward of the country, his wife and children a measure far exceeding in cruelty and still living in the cottage unmolested. injustice any one ever brought forward At the end of seven months, Dillane reby the infamous Castlereagh. The turned to Palace Kenrick, where he hon. and learned Gentleman concluded, lived quietly for some time. On the by declaring his intention to visit at the day of the murder, he and his wife went close of the parliamentary session every to a neighbouring fair, where they inborough in England, and detail the ca- sultingly displayed the blood-money in lanities which had been inflicted on the presence of those whose sons had Ireland. He would then return to his suffered. In the evening the men, renative land, to brave the dagger and turning from the fair, greatly excited by the dungeon. Mr. O'Connell sat down the conduct of Dillane, knocked at the amidst tremendous cheering; and short- cottage door, called him out, and murJy afterwards left the nieeting, to attend dered him in the high road. After to his parliamentary duties.

having perpetrated this deed, they enSome interruption had been experi- tered the cottage, and murdered the enced during part of Mr. O'Connell's wife. The right hon. baronet had stated speech, from a little knot of sons on that the child recognised the murderers the platform. They were nuw in- by the light of a blazing turf, hastily vited to come forward, but declined placed on the hearth. Now, as to the doing so.

probability of this story. It was adMr. Powell and Mr. Goode then nitted that the family had been some addressed the meeting in support of the time in bed, previous to the perpetration resolution.

of the murder. It was not probable, Mr. GRADY wished to wipe off a stain therefore, that there could have been that had been cast on the Irish nation much fire upon the hearth, and everyby that Joseph Surface of real life-that body who knew the nature of turf, must cunning of statesmen-Sir Robert knows that a piece of this material Peel. He alluded to the tale with which hastily thrown upon the embers could Sir Robert Peel was said to have elec- not have created a light sufficient to entrified the House of Commøns, relative able any one in a room to discern and to a murder that had been committed identify the features of eight or ten in Ireland. He (Mr. Grady) was pre- persons; forty-seven men were appre

notified my

hended on suspicion of the murder, an:l just. The hon. Gentleman continued upon the sole evidence of the child, to address the meeting for a considerimprobable as he (Mr. G.) had shown able time, but the greater part of his it to be, eleven of them were executed, speech Wis inaudible, from the noise of whom only two acknowledged their which prevailed in consequence of his guilt, but declarıd that they did not stating sentiments so much at variance enter the cottage, as stated by Sir R. with the feelings of the meeting. Peel. It was worthy of remark, 100, Mr. Hunt also addressed the meeting that these two men were arraigned with' in support of the resolution, which was three others. During the examination put and cırried unanimously, and a peof one of them, he stated that the three lition, founded on the same, was put and were innocent, upon which he was im- carried. Thanks having been given to mediately sent back without being al- the Chairman, and three cheers given lowed to finish his tale. The three were for Mr. Tennyson, and as many groans found guilty, and executed, at places for Mr. Hawes, the meeting separated. distant seven miles from each other, the living man being carried to the place of execusion in the same cart which carried the dead body of the others.

GARDEN SEEDS.
Mr. Texnyson, upon coming forward,
was warmly received. He observed that I,

some time
ago,

intenhe could not have supposed that the first tion of selling garden 'seeds this winter ; measure which was to have been sub. and I am now prepared to do it. Those mitted to a reforined House of Com- who have read my writings on Agriinons, by a Ministry professing the most CULTURE and GARDENING, and particuliberal principles, would be a bill for larly my ** ENGLISH GARDENER," suspending the constitution upon such will have perceived that I set forth, very inefficient evidence ; but much less with much pains, the vast importance did he think that the House would have of being extremely careful with regard passed such a bill. He thought a time to the seeds which one sows: and, as might arrive when it would be abso- to which matter, there are two things Jutely necessary to suspend trial by jury. to be attended to ; first, the genuineness (Loud cries of No, no) It was his opi- of the seeds; and next, as to their nion, and he should never shrink from soundness. The former is the more expressing it. In the present instance important point of the two; for it is a no case had been made out. The hon. great deal better to have no plants at Gentleman here entered into a long de- all, than to have things come up, and, tail of his Parliamentary conduct, which at the end of a month or two, to find was interrupted by frequent bursts of that you have got a parcel of stuff, not applause.

at all resembling that which you thought Mr. Hawes, upon coming forward, you were about to have. Those who experienced a very different reception have read my Gardening Book, chap. 4, from his hon. colleague. He attempted will want very little more to convince to defend his vote relative to the Coer- them of the importance of this matter. cion Bill, by expressing his confidence I have always taken great delight in in Ministers, and of the absolute neces- having perfect plants of every descripsity of passing such a measure. He tion; but, to get into the way of raising said that nothing but what he considered good and true garden seeds, requires the most pressing necessity could have that you be settled upon some sufficient induced him to support it, and that he space of ground for several successive was resolved ever to maintain, as he years; and it has been my lot to live hitherto had done, an independent under a Government, which, if you

He had twice voted against the liberty to differ from it in opinion, Ministers, and would do so again when has taken care to prevent you, by hook he considered their measures to be un- or by crook, frons being settled in any

take

course.

place, except one of its prisons, for any year. The large seeds were in paper considerable length of time Since, bags, and the smaller seeds in papers. however, it, in a lucky hour, hal the In the box along with the seeds, I ;ut wisdom to pass Peel's Bill, it has a printed paper containing a list of the been rather less rummaging; though it names of the several seeds, and against certainly meant well towaru's me is the each name the number, froin numbers year 1831. I have, however, been suf- one to the end : then, there were corfered to remain long enough at Kin- responding numbers marked upon the SINGTON to bring the seeds of a good bags and the parcels. So that, to know many plants to what I deem perfection, the sort of seed, the purchaser had noand others nearly to that state; and I thing to do but to look at the numbers have taken a little farm in Surrey, parily on the parcels and then to look at the for the purpose of raising garden seeds list. Many of these boxes of seeds went upon a greater scale than I was able to as far as Lower Canada to the north, do it at KENSINGTON ; this year I have and into the FLORIDAS, to New Orraised a considerable quantity of seeds, LEANS, and even to the West India iswhich I now offer for sale in the fol- lands, to the south; and the net prolowing manner, and on the following ceeds were amongst the means of enaterms.

bling me to prance about the country; It does not suit me to keep a seed- amongst the means of enabling me to shop, and to retail seeds by the small lead a pleasant life ; of enabling me to quantity ; but to make up packages, stretch my long arm across the Atlantic, each sufficient for a garden for the year, and to keep up the thumping upon Corand to sell that package for a fixed suuruption, which I did to some tune. of money. When I was driven to Long I intend to dispose of my seeds in the Island by SIDMouTu's lungeon bill, same manner now, except that I shall and when the Hampshire parsons and use coarse linen bags instead of boxes. SIDMOUTH and CaSTLERKAGII chuckled The several parcels of seeds will be put at the thought of my being gone to up either in paper bags or paper parcels; mope away my life in melancholy, in and a printed list with the names and the United States; and when the fa- numbers will be prepared ; and, then, mous traveller, Mr. Fearon, brought the parcels and the list will be put into home word, that I was whiling away my the linen bag, and sewed up, and will life in a dilapidated country house, the be ready to be sent away to any person paths to which were over-run with who may want it. thistles and brambles; when Mr. Fea- A bag for a considerable garden ; a RON, that accurate observer, exclaimed, garden of the better part of an acre, in the language of his brother Solo perhaps, will be sold for twenty-five MON,

“Lo! it was all grown over with shillings; and for a smaller garden, thorns, and nettles covered the face for twelve shillings and sixpence. These thereof, and the post and rail fence seeds, if bought at the shop of a seeds" thereof was broken down;" when man, would come to more than three Mr. Fearon, in the fulnees of his com- times the money; and so they ought : passion, was thus exclaiming, I, though for the seedsman has his expensive he found me in a pair of Yankee shop to keep ; has his books to trousers not worth a groat, was pre- keep'; has his credit to give, and has paring to sell seeds in house his seeds to purchase with his ready at New York, for which I gave four- money. While, therefore, I have a teen hundred dollars year. In short, right to proceed in my manner, he does

a great quantity of seeds nothing wrong. By the lists, which I from London, which I sold principally publish below, the reader will perceive in the following manner:

that, to the garden seeds I have added I had little boxes made, into each of the seeds of several annual flowers. which I put a sufficiency of each sort of They are not of very rare kinds; but seeds for a gentleman's garden for the they are all very pretty; and, even these

a

I imported

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