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not, to loathe the connexion ; would each other, and thanking our represhe not deserve the tie which united sentatives for the taxes they had reher to a noxious and loathsome compa- mitted, and the burdens they had rem nion? (Yes, yes). Repeal and sepa- moved. I did hope that it would be to ration will then become the cry of Eng. congratulate our Írish brethren that a. land. I hope they may not proclaim reformed Parliament would have abo.. you for it. He feared he was too long. Jisheil the odious tithes; the sinecure (Cries of “ No, no; go on, go on ''). Protestant church ; purified the courts The learned Gentleman said he could of justice, and given impartial juries and not, there were others to follow him. I honest judges. (Cheers). What, howshall now close. I thank you from the ever, is the cause of our meeting this day? very bottom of my heart, and soul. We are met humbly to petition our repre-; (Great cheering). I thank you for my- sentatives that they will be pleased to self as well as for my most ill-used and reject the most despotic, the most sanmost unfortunate country. I offer you guinary bill that any Tory minister had the thanks of eight millions of Irishmen. ever dared to offer, even to a boroughIf I have delayed you too long—“ No, mongering House of Commons. Mr. no")-do not blame me. I am not Hoogetts then entered into an historical without an excuse--when we are about account of tithes, and the manner of to look for the last time upon a dearly their appropriation, from the time of beloved object--when our last inter- “ that wife-killing inonster, Henry view has arrived (hear), we linger over the Eighth," . to the present time; the sad and mournful parting. We and observed that a great portion look again and again. So do I now; 1 of the tithes, instead of going for the who now address you am about to support of the poor, the spread of edureturn to a proclaimed land, where li- cation, the building and repairing of berty of speech is about to be inter- churches and chapels, &c., was the dicted. Now I may, raise my voice in property of lay lords and wealthy com-. defence of freedom-soon I must not. moners. The Duke of Devonshire (Cries of “ You must,' “ You shall ”). I alone took the tithes of twenty-seven I am, I feel I am, taking my leave of Irish parishes, and spent it in Engliberty. I am speaking, perhaps, for land. (Cries of Shame). The time the last time the free ihoughts of a free was now, however, come, when the citizen. Ann I then to be blamed if people refused to pay tithes : they did I have over long, perhaps, prolonged not resist, but, like the Quakers, left the the indulgence ? One word more, Never parsons to their remedy of distraint. cease to work for Ireland-stand by her They did distrain--they took froin the for her sake and your own. On you starving children the cow on whose. we repose our trust in this awful crisis. milk they depended for existence, and (Loud and tremendous cheering follow the blankets which formed their only ed the learned gentleman's very vivid bed. (Groans and disapprobation). These and eloquent appeal).

were taken to be sold for as many shilMr. Hopgetrs, in coming forward to lings or pence as perhaps theywere worth propose the first resolution, said: “ It in pounds. But to the glory of Ireland is with feelings of mortification that I be it said no purchaser could be found ; meet you here this day for the purpose for, like Cain, they were branded with a for which we are assembled. I did fatal mark. Mr. Hodgetts then entered hope that ere now the boroughmonger into a detail of some of the provisions of would have relaxed his grasp, and that the act, which he denominated a concena Reform Bill would have been contration of ali the venom contained in all ceded to us under which we should the despotic Tory Acts of Parliament hare some little voice in the choice of ever passed. And this bill, said he, our representatives.. (Cheers). I did which is to deluge our sister island in hope that our next meeting would have blood, which is to reduce her people to beeu for the purpose of congratulating a savage desperation, is the work of the

patriot Earl Grey, the reformer of a half thority in the land, at least it used to a century standing. This is the work be so. But the times are changed, of your chosen representatives. (Groans) there is another description of marked Lord Byron hud taunted Ireland with evidence now brought forward, which having spawned the viper Castlereagh it appears deserves more credence ; Now might Ireland retort upon us, and perhaps the evidence of the Irish tithe. say we had returned her the scorpion supporting magistrates. As an instance Stanley. (Loud cheers). He concluded of what the magistracy have done to by saying that if they suffered Ireland to cause the belief that the country was at be enslaved, their race of freedom rebellion, the member for Mallow dined would be quickly run, and they would with the Rev. Mr. Barry, P. P., of deserve to be slaves. (Loud cheering). Bantry, a rev. gentleman, whose name

Mr. M. J. Jago, of the county of I cannot mention without feelings ol Cork, was next introduced, and said, deep respect, for while he uses his best I come forward to-day to plead the exertions to keep the peace of the councause of my country, or rather I should try undisturbed, his efforts are unceassay, to give evidence on the actual state ing in the support of the rights and of it, for Englishmen require no impetus liberties of the people. (Applause). to advocate the cause of suffering liberty. At the front of the house of this Freedom is the inherent right of En- reverend gentleman, a few persons glishmen. The slave, when he treads assembled and made a fire as a comon the English shore, is from that mo- pliment to Mr. Jephson. What did ment free. (Cheers). Those banners the magistrates do? They ordered which so proudly float over your heads the military under arms, and the police even as the law now is, convince me I were in readiness, for what? To put am 'not in Ireland. Englishmen, is it down rebellion. Hear this, people of Eng. not unjust to deny to Ireland what is land. I suppose this is one of Lord Grey's tolerated in England ? Is it not mon- masked statements. A few days after a strous that Lord Grey should bring in ballad-singer was singing in the streets a bill, having for its object the destruc- of Skibbereen, on a Sunday, a song, with tion of every remnant of Irish liberty, in which I think a poor fellow might make the absence of all justifiable evidence of his fortune by bringing to Manchester. its necessity ? (Hear, hear). When he It was, after all, but a squib upon the is asked to produce evidence, what is tithe proctors. However, at the hour his reply

He implores noble Lords of one o'clock, when the people were at not to impede the progress of the mea- divine service, the soldiery were ordered sure, in which they are so deeply con- out from church to put down the balcerned. Is this the manner in which to lad-singing rebellion. Such, my friends, treat a country that is perfectly quiet? I have little doubt are the parties from (Cries of “ No, no"). I lately came whom Lord Grey has received his fear. from the south of Ireland, and in (ful information of the state of the counDublin I met gentlemen of respecta- try. But I cannot yet believe otherwise bility from Derry, Belfast, Sligo, than that he will before long be led to and Limerick, and their united testi- acknowledge his errors as to the true mony was, that Ireland is perfectly state of Ireland, and that he will come quiet. (Cheers). But if that evidence forward with that manliness which once be thought insufficient I refer to the ad- marked his character, and say that the dresses of the different judges of assizes bill would be withdrawn. Yes, I entreat at present on circuit in Ireland. At of him to do so, before public opinion Ennis, the judge congratulated the and public feeling exhibited at meetings country on its quietness ; and Chief like this shall pronounce that the bill Justice Doherty says, “There is nothing shall not pass. (Loud cheers). What has “ remarkable at Trim, to cause him to Ireland been doomed to suffer during " advert to the state of the country." ages of misrule! She had some slight This is the evidence of the highest au- hopes that her sufferings would end when

11

answer.

the Reform Bills passed, and she forgot ¡CLARKE, J. P., Manchester, commissionher conımercial embarrassments, sup: ENDEN, R., Newgate street, tailor. posing that a remedial measure was at FREEMAN, J. Blainafon, Monmouthsbire, hand! Bus how has she been disap- victualler. pointed. Every valuable institution in HOLTHOUSE, C., New-road, St. George'sthe country totters. Yes, men of Man

in-the-east, sugar-refiner.

HOPSON, E., Stonehouse, Gloucestersbire, i chester, I dread that there will be a call

draper. for gold. Should that be the case, will NEWSON, J., Silver - street, Wood - street,

you get the debts now owing to you in whitesmith. i Ireland. Will there be any demand for OAKS, W., Houndsditch, coppersmith. your manufactured goods ? No! trade WATTS, E., Oldbury on the hill, Gloucester

shire, saddler. will languish : you will lose to a great WITT, G., Chenies-street, Bedford-square, extent the Irish market. Property in cheesemonger, general will be much depreciated in va lue. A general commercial embarrass

Tuesday, March, 5, 1833. ment will take place, and England herself will not be secure. But for this the

INSOLVENT. Ministry, will have to

The PAUL, J., Houndsditch, baker, speaker concluded by thanking the BANKRUPTCIES SUPERSEDED. meeting for the patience with which CUE, C., Gloucester, hatter. they had listened to him. (Cheers). HAYNES, T., Great Yarmouth,cabinet-maker.

A number of other gentlemen subse- TIMSON, A., Dover, draper. quently addressed the meeting, and de.

BANKRUPTS. precated in very strong language the measures recently introduced by Earl BYERS, G., Pall-mall, hatter.

HARRIS, W., Tutbury, Staffordshire, brickGrey for the suppresion of disturbances

naker. in Ireland.

HESLINGTON, G, Knaresborough, YorkA series of resolutions, and a petition

shire, linen-draper.

KEITH, W., Manchester, merchant. the legislature, were unanimously

PARKER, J., Houndsditch, cork-cutter. passed-something singular in this town ROSSETER, T., Ruinsey, Southampton, milwhere there exists so niuch party feel- Jer. ing.

SWIFT, J., Liverpool, white cooper. WILLIAMSON, R. and T., Manchester, flourdealers.

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATION.

MACLACHLIN, A., Glasgow, merchant.
From the LONDON GAZETTE,
FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1833.
INSOLVENTS.

LONDON MARKETS. SPIVEY, J., King-street, Great Hermitage- MARK-Lane, Corn-Exchange, Mar. 4.street, provision-dealer.

The arrivals of Wheat and other Grain from TWYCROSS, W., Gudalming, Surrey, leather- Kent, Essex, and Suffolk, fresh up to this dresser.

morning's market, were extremely limited,

and the samples, though somewhat improved BANKRUPTCY SUPERSEDED. in condition from those of last week, yet for FREEMAN, J., jun., Drayton, Somersetshire, the most part they still handled rough. At sail cloth-manufacturer.

the commencement of the market, one of the principal house; bought rather freely the sea

lected parcels for Yorkshire account, which BANKRUPTS.

caused a briskness in the trade, and the rates BEARE, J., Pall-Mall East, iron and brass of this day week were fully realised, towards founder.

the close, however, the demand relaxed, and BEST, W.A., and R., Birmingham, pocket- the market finished dull. Old Wheats ex pebook-makers.

rienced a moderate demand at former quotaBROCKMAN, J. Leamington-Priors, War- tions, chiefly for Scotch account. Wheat in wickshire, wine-merchant.

bond met with no inquiry. CASTLEDEN, S., Three Colt-street, Lime- The short supply of barley rendered the house, baker.

trade steady, all descriptions met a tolerably

patriot Earl Grey, the reformer of a half|thority in the land, at least it used to a century standing. This is the work be so. But the times are changed, of your chosen representatives. (Groans) there is another description of marked Lord Byron had taunted Ireland with evidence now brought forward, which having spawned the viper Castlereagh it appears deserves more credence; Now might Ireland retort upon us, and perhaps the evidence of the Irish tithe. say we had returned her the scorpion supporting magistrates. As an instance Stanley. (Loud cheers). He concluded of what the magistracy have done to by saying that if they suffered Ireland to cause the belief that the country was at be enslaved, their race of freedom rebellion, the member for Mallow dined would be quickly run, and they would with the Rev. Mr. Barry, P. P., of deserve to be slaves. (Loud cheering). Bantry, a rev. gentleman, whose name

Mr. M. J. Jago, of the county of I cannot mention without feelings ol Cork, was next introduced, and said, deep respect, for while he uses his best I come forward to-day to plead the exertions to keep the peace of the coun. cause of my country, or rather I should try undisturbed, his efforts are unceassay, to give evidence on the actual state ing in the support of the rights and of it, for Englishmen require no impetus liberties of the people. (Applause). to advocate the cause of suffering liberty. At the front of the house of this Freedom is the inherent right of En- reverend gentleman, a few persons glishmen. The slave, when he treads assembled and made a fire as a comon the English shore, is from that mo- pliment to Mr. Jephson. What did ment free. (Cheers). Those banners the magistrates do?

They ordered which so proudly float over your heads the military under arms, and the police even as the law now is, convince me I were in readiness, for what? To put am 'not in Ireland. Englishmen, is it down rebellion. Hear this, people of Eng. not unjust to deny to Ireland what is land. I suppose this is one of Lord Grey's tolerated in England ? Is it not mon- masked statements. A few days after a strous that Lord Grey should bring in ballad-singer was singing in the streets a bill, having for its object the destruc- of Skibbereen, on a Sunday, a song, with tion of every remnant of Irish liberty, in which I think a poor fellow might make the absence of all justifiable evidence of his fortune by bringing to Manchester

. its necessity? (Hear, hear). When he It was, after all, but a squib upon

the is asked to produce evidence, what is tithe proctors. However, at the hour his reply

He implores noble Lords of one o'clock, when the people were at not to impede the progress of the mea- divine service, the soldiery were ordered sure, in which they are so deeply con- out from church to put down the balcerned. Is this the manner in which to lad-singing rebellion. Such, my friends, treat a country that is perfectly quiet? I have little doubt are the parties from (Cries of “ No, no"). I lately came whom Lord Grey has received his fear. from the south of Ireland, and in (ful information of the state of the counDublin I met gentlemen of respecta- try. But I cannot yet believe otherwise bility from Derry, Belfast, Sligo, than that he will before long be led to and Limerick, and their united testi- acknowledge his errors as to the true mony was, that Ireland is perfectly state of Ireland, and that he will come quiet. (Cheers). But if that evidence forward with that manliness which once be thought insufficient I refer to the ad- marked his character, and say that the dresses of the different judges of assizes bill would be withdrawn. Yes, I entreat at present on circuit in Ireland. At of him to do so, before public opinion Ennis, the judge congratulated the and public feeling exhibited at meetings country on its quietness ; and Chief like this shall pronounce that the bill Justice Doherty says, “There is nothing shall not pass. (Loud cheers). What has “ remarkable at Trim, to cause him to Ireland been doomed to suffer during " advert to the state of the country.” ages of misrule! She had some slight This is the evidence of the highest au- hopes that her sufferings would end when

answer.

the Reform Bills passed, and she forgot | CLARKE, J. P., Manchester, commissionher conımercial embarrassments, sup: EDDEN, R., Newgate street, tailor.

ageut. posing that a remedial measure was at FREEMÁN, J. Blainafon, Monmouthshire, hand! But how has she been disap- victualler. pointed. Every valuable institution in HOLTHOUSE, C., New-road, St. George'sthe country totters. Yes, men of Man- in-the-east, sugar-refiner. chester, I dread that there will be a call HOPSON, E., Stonehouse, Gloucestershire,

draper. for gold. Should at be case, will NEWSON, J., Silver - street, Wood - street, you get the debts now owing to you in whitesmith. Ireland. Will there be any demand for OAKS, W., Houndsditch, coppersmith.

WATTS, E., Oldbury on the bill, Gloucesteryour manufactured goods ? No! trade

shire, saddler. will languish: you will lose to a great WITT, G., Chenies-street, Bedford-square, extent ihe Irish market. Property in

cheesemnobger, general will be much depreciated in value. A general commercial embarrass

Tuesday, MARCH, 5, 1833. ment will take place, and England herself will not be secure. But for this the

INSOLVENT. Ministry, will have to

The PAUL, J., Houndsditch, baker, speaker concluded by thanking the BANKRUPTCIES SUPERSEDED. meeting for the patience with which CUE, C., Gloucester, hatter. they had listened to him. (Cheers). HAYNES, T., Great Yarmouth,cabinet-maker.

A number of other gentlemen subse- TIMSON, A., Dover, draper. quently addressed the meeting, and de.

BANKRUPTS. precated in very strong language the measures recently introduced by Earl BYERS, G., Pall-mall, batter.

HARRIS, W., Tutbury, Staffordshire, brickGrey for the suppresion of disturbances

naker. in Ireland.

HESLINGTON, G, Knaresborough, YorkA series of resolutions, and a petition

shire, linen-draper. to the legislature, were unanimously PARKER, J., Houndsditch, cork-cutter.

KEITH, W., Manchester, merchant. passed—something singular in this town ROSSETER, T., Rornsey, Southampton, milwhere there exists so much party feel- Jer. ing

SWIFT, J., Liverpool, white cooper. WILLIAMSON, R. and T., Manchester, fourdealers.

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATION.
From the LONDON GAZETTE,

MACLACHLIN, A., Glasgow, merchant.
FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1833.
INSOLVENTS.

LONDON MARKETS. SPIVEY, J., King-street, Great Hermitage- MARK-Lane, CORN-EXCHANGE, Mar. 4.street, provision-dealer.

The arrivals of Wheat and other Grain from TWYCROSS, W., Gudalming, Surrey, leather. Kent, Essex, and Suffolk, fresh up to this dresser.

morning's market, were extremely limited,

and the samples, though somewhat improved BANKRUPTCY SUPERSEDED. in condition from those of last week, yet for FREEMAN, J., jun., Drayton, Somersetshire, the most part they still handled rough. At sail cloth-manufacturer.

the commencement of the market, one of the principal house; bought rather freely the se

lected parcels for Yorkshire account, which BANKRUPTS.

caused a briskness in the trade, and the rates BEARE, J., Pall-Mall East, iron and brass- of this day week were fully realised, towards founder.

the close, however, the demand relaxed, and BEST, W. A., and R., Birmingham, pocket- the market finished dull. Old Wheats ex pe

rienced a moderate demand at former quotaBROCKMAN, J. Leamington-Priors, War- tions, chiefly for Scotch account. Wheat in wickshire, wine-mercbant.

bond met with no inquiry. CASTLEDEN, S., Three Colt-street,

Lime- The short supply of barley rendered the house, baker.

trade steady, all descriptions met a tolerably

book-makers.

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