Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Mr. Fearon, in the fulness of his com- times the money; and so they ought: passion, was thus exclaiming, I, though for the seedsman has his expensive he found me in a pair of Yankee shop to keep ; has his books to trousers not worth a groat, was pre- keep; has his credit to give, and has paring to sell seeds in a house his seeds to purchase with his ready at New YORK, for which I gave four- money. While, therefore, I have a teen hundred dollars a year. In short, right to proceed in my manner, he does I imported a great quantity of seeds nothing wrong. By ihe lists, which I from London, which I sold principally publish below, the reader will perceive in the following manner:

that, to the garden seeds I have added I had little boxes. made, into each of the seeds of several annual flowers. which I put a sufficiency of each sort of They are not of very rare kinds; but seeds for a gentleman's garden for the they are all very pretty; and, even these year. The large seeds were in paper flower seeds alone, if purchased at a bags, and the smaller seeds in papers seedsman's, would come, and ought to In the box along with the seeds, I put come, to pretty nearly one half of the a printed paper containing a list of the money which I charge for the whole. names of the several seeds, and against Of some of the sorts of seeds the pureach name the number, from numbers chaser will think the quantity small; one to the end : then, there were cor- and, of these the cauliflower is one; responding numbers marked upon the but, it must be a thundering garden that bags and the parcels. So that, to know requires more than three hundred caulithe sort of seed, the purchaser had no- flower plants; and, if carefully sowed, thing to do but to look at the numbers agreeably to the directions in my

Garon the parcels and then to look at the dening Book, the seed which I put up is list. Many of these boxes of seeds went more than sufficient for any gentleman's as far as Lower Canada to the north, garden ; and I will pledge myself for the and into the FLORIDAS, to New OR- soundness of every individual seed. In LEANs, and even to the West India is- the small bag, the quantity is in prolands, to the south ; and the net pro- portion to the price. Authors always ceeds were amongst the means of ena- want people to read their books; or, to bling me to prance about the country; purchase them at least. The reader will amongst the means of enabling me to not, therefore, be surprised, that I most lead a pleasant life ; of enabling me to earnestly exhort all those who buy my stretch my long arm across the Atlantic, seeds, to buy my book, too, and even and to keep up the thumping upon Cor- then they will not have half so much to ruption, which I did to some tune. pay as if they had to purchase the seeds

I intend to dispose of my seeds in the of a seedsman. same manner now, except that I shall I have only one fear upon this occause coarse linen bags instead of boxes. sion, and that is, that gentlemen's garThe several parcels of seeds will be put deners, who are in the habit of dealing up either in paper bags or paper parcels; with seedsmen, and who are apt to adand a printed list with the names and here too literally to that text of Scrip; numbers will be prepared ; and, then, ture, which says that "he who soweth the parcels and the list will be put into abundantly shall reap abundantly;" but, the linen bag, and sewed up, and will begging their pardon, this does not be ready to be sent away to any person mean covering the ground with the who may want it.

seeds, which, though it may produce A bag for a considerable garden ; a abundant reaping to the seedsman, is garden of the better part of an acre, far from having that tendency with reperhaps, will be sold for twenty-five gard to the crop. Thick sowing is, shillings; and for a smaller garden, indeed, injurious in three ways: first, for twelve shillings and sixpence. These it is a waste of seed and of seeds, if bought

at the shop of a seeds- which it is actually a flinging away of man, would come to more than three both : second, it makes work in the

money,

of

[ocr errors][merged small]

thinning out of the plants: third, the" is sold only at my shop.” This plants will never be so fine if they is the seed of the CISALPINE strawcome up thick. Therefore, in my berry: this strawberry, unlike all others Gardening Book, chapter 4, beginning that I ever heard of, produces its like at paragraph 85, I take very great pains from the seed; is raised with the greatto give instructions for thin sowing ; lest facility, bears most abundantly, and and, if every one who cultivates a gar- keeps bearing until the hard frosts come. den could see the regularity, the clean- The seeds are so small that a little ness, and the beauty, of my seed beds, pinch of them between the finger and never should we again see a parcel of the thumb is sufficient for a very large seeds flung promiscuously over the garden ; and the method of rearing the ground. It is probable, that three hun- plants is this : about the first week of dred cauliflower seeds will lie in a thim- February, or it may be a little later, fill ble ; and if you want three hundred with fine earth, to within about an inch plants, it is better to sow these three of the top, a flower-pot from twelve to hundred seeds in a proper manner, than fifteen inches over ; take the little pinch to fing twenty thousand seeds over the of seed and scatter it very thinly over same space of ground. You must cut the top of the earth ; then put some very the superfluous seeds up with a hoe, or fine earth over the seed a quarter of an pull them out with your hand;; and, inch thick, or rather less. Set the pot in small as they are, and insignificant as a green-house, or in the window of any you may think their roots to be, they room where the sun comes, and give warob and starve one another, even before ter very carefully, and very gently, as they get into rough leaf. I know very occasion may require. When the warm well, that it requires a great deal more weather comes, the pot should be set out time to sow a bed of a hundred feet of doors in a warın place when there is long, and with cabbages, for instance ; no heavy rain, and should be taken in at a great deal more time to sow it in night if there be any fear of frost. Todrills, and to put the seed in thinly, wards the end of April, the pot may be than to fling the seed thickly over the set out of doors altogether ; and, small ground and just rake it in; but, look as the plants will still be, they will be at the subsequent operations ; and you fit to be planted out in the natural will find that, in the end, this “ sowing ground by the middle, or towards the abundantly " costs ten times the time latter end, of May. Then dig a piece and the labour which are required by of ground deep, and make it extremely the method of sowing pointed out in fine upon the top, and put out the little my book. Therefore, let no man ima- plants in rows two feet apart, and two gine, that to have a plentiful crop a feet apart in the row ; for, though not great quantity of seed is necessary. bigger than a thread, each plant will When, indeed, you have reason to fear multiply itself into a considerable tuft that the seed is not sound, and when you before the middle of July; and then cannot obtain that which you know to they will begin to bear, and they will be sound, it may be prudent to throw in keep on bearing as long as the hard frosts great parcels of it in order to have the keep away. The very runners which best chance to get some plants; but, proceed from these plants, will take hap-bazard work like

this ought root, blow, and have ripe fruit, during to be avoided, if possible; and, at the first autumn. When the bearing is any rate, I pledge myself, for the over, cut off all the runners, clear the soundness of all my. seed; I pledge ground close up to the tufts, and let the myself that, if properly sowed, every tufts remain to bear another year, when seed that I sell shall grow.

Thus far their produce is prodigious. But, then as to my seeds in general. I have you must grub them up; for they so now to speak of one sort of seed, multiply their offsets, and so fill the which, as that horrible old Whig, ground with their roots, that they almost Sir Robert Walpole, said of his bribes, cease to bear if they remain longer. So

G

Mr. Fearon, in the fulness of his com- times the money; and so they ought: passion, was thus exclaiming, I, though for the seedsman has his expensive he found me in a pair of Yankee shop to keep ; has his books to trousers not worth a groat, was pre- keep; has his credit to give, and has paring to sell seeds in house his seeds to purchase with his ready at New YORK, for which I gave four- money. While, therefore, I have a teen hundred dollars a year. In short, right to proceed in my manner, he does I imported a great quantity of seeds nothing wrong. By the lists, which I from London, which I sold principally publish below, the reader will perceive in the following manner:

that, to the garden seeds I have added I had little boxes made, into each of the seeds of several annual flowers. which I put a sufficiency of each sort of They are not of very rare kinds; but seeds for a gentleman's garden for the they are all very pretty; and, even these year. The large seeds were in paper flower seeds alone, if purchased at a bags, and the smaller seeds in papers seedsman's, would come, and ought to In the box along with the seeds, I put come, to pretty nearly one half of the a printed paper containing a list of the money which I charge for the whole. names of the several seeds, and against Of some of the sorts of seeds the pureach name the number, from numbers chaser will think the quantity small ; one to the end : then, there were cor- and, of these the cauliflower is one; responding numbers marked upon the but, it must be a thundering garden that bags and the parcels. So that, to know requires more than three hundred caulithe sort of seed, the purchaser had no- flower plants; and, if carefully sowed, thing to do but to look at the numbers agreeably to the directions in my Garon the parcels and then to look at the dening Book, the seed which I put up is list. Many of these boxes of seeds went more than sufficient for any gentleman's as far as Lower Canada to the north, garden ; and I will pledge myself for the and into the FLORIDAS, to New OR- soun ness of every individual seed. In LEANs, and even to the West India is- the small bag, the quantity is in prolands, to the south ; and the net pro- portion to the price. Authors always ceeds were amongst the means of ena- want people to read their books; or, to bling me to prance about the country; purchase them at least. The reader will amongst the means of enabling me to not, therefore, be surprised, that I most lead a pleasant life ; of enabling me to earnestly exhort all those who buy my stretch my long arm across the Atlantic, seeds, to buy my book, too, and even and to keep up the thumping upon Cor- then they will not have half so much to ruption, which I did to some tune. pay as if they had to purchase the seeds

I intend to dispose of my seeds in the of a seedsman, same manner now, except that I shall I have only one fear upon this occause coarse linen bags instead of boxes. sion, and that is, that gentlemen's garThe several parcels of seeds will be put deners, who are in the habit of dealing up either in paper bags or paper parcels; with seedsmen, and who are apt to adand a printed list with the names and here too literally to that text of Scripnumbers will be prepared ; and, then, ture, which says that “he who soweth the parcels and the list will be put into abundantly shall reap abundantly;" but, the linen bag, and sewed up, and will begging their pardon, this does not be ready to be sent away to any person mean covering the ground with the who may want it.

seeds, which, though it may produce A bag for a considerable garden ; af abundant reaping to the seedsman, is garden of the better part of an acre, far from having that tendency with reperhaps, will be sold for twenty-five gard to the crop. Thick sowing is, shillings; and for a smaller garden, indeed, injurious in three ways : first, for twelve shillings and sixpence. These it is a waste of seed and of money, of seeds, if bought at the shop of a seeds- which it is actually a flinging away of man, would come to more than three both : second, it makes work in the

[ocr errors]

thinning out of the plants: third, the plants will never be so fine if they come up thick.

up thick. Therefore, in my ore Gardening Book, chapter 4, beginning at paragraph 85, I take very great pains bs. to give instructions for thin sowing ;les". and, if every one who cultivates a gar- kr.den could see the regularity, the clean- Tis. ness, and the beauty, of my seed beds, piz never should we again see a parcel of the seeds flung promiscuously over the garve ground. It is probable, that three hun- plau. -dred cauliflower seeds will lie in a thim- Febria ble ; and if you want three hundred with sav. plants, it is better to sow these three of the s-, hundred seeds in a proper manner, than fifteen die to sing twenty thousand seeds over the of seel s. same space of ground. You must cut the top o: the superfluous seeds up with a hoe, or fine eari.. w-. pull them out with your hand; and, inch twiligh small as they are, and insignificant as a green-isu. you may think their roots to be, they room webe. rob and starve one another, even before ter very cute they get into rough leaf. I know very occasion lisa; -well, that it requires a great deal more weather colis time to sow a bed of a hundred feet of doors in a na long, and with cabbages, for instance ; no heavy rasl., a great deal more time to sow it in night if there wi drills, and to put the seed in thinly, wards the ento than to fling the seed thickly over the set out of cour: ground and just rake it in; but, look as the plants w. at the subsequent operations ; and you fit to be plans will find that, in the end, this “ sowing ground by the u... abundantly costs ten times the time latter end, of als and the labour which are required by of ground dext, the method of sowing pointed out in fine upon the innan my book. Therefore, let no man ima- plants in rows los gine, that to have a plentiful crop a feet apart in the great quantity of seed is necessary. bigger than is here When, indeed, you have reason to fear multiply itselt is. that the seed is not sound, and when you before the new cannot obtain that which you know to they will begin be sound, it may be prudent to throw in keep on bearing a great parcels of it in order to have the keep away. In best chance to get some plants ; but, proceed from 16x hap-bazard work like this ought root, blow, and me to be avoided, if possible; and, at the first autumn, any rate, I pledge myself, for the over, cut off all ta soundness of all my seed; I pledge ground close up to in myself that, if properly sowed every seed that I sell shall grow iş fa as to my seeds in ge

ha

nust grub these now to speak of one

se

ply their offsets, which, as that horr ole, s

bri se to bear if th

[graphic]

Sir Robert

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

that you must have a new plantation from 5. ... Kidney (or French) Scarlet seed every year; and the seed you may

Runners. save yourself, by squeezing the pulp of 6.

White Runners. dead-ripe strawberries in water, which 7.

Black Dwarf. sends the seed to the bottom of the wa- 8.

Dun Dwarf. ter : you skim off the pulp, and drain 9.

Robin-Egg. away the water, then put the seed out 10.

Speckled. in the sun to dry, and then put it up 11. Beet-Red. and preserve it for sowing in the winter. 12. Brocoli-White. There is a red sort and a white sort, 13. ...Purple. which you may keep separate or sow 14. Cabbage-Early Battersea. them and plant them promiscuously, 15.

Early York. And, now, to do justice to Sir Charles 16.

Savoy. WOLSLEY, who is my teacher as to this 17. Cale-Curled—Scotch. piece of knowledge, and at whose house, 18. Carrot. at Wolsley PARK, I saw, in September 19. Cauliflower. last, the finest dishes of strawberries 20. Celery. that I ever had seen in the whole course 21. Chervil. of my life. They were served up in a 22. Cress. mixed state, some red and some white; 23. Cucumber, early frame. and the taste and fragrance were equal 24. Corn (Cobbelt's). to the beauty. Sir CHARLES was so 25. Endive. good as to make his gardener save me 26. Leek. a considerable quantity of the seed, 27. Lettuce-White Coss. which, by the bursting of the paper, be- 28.

.Russia Coss. came mixed; and, therefore, the parcels 29.

. Brown Dutch. of this strawberry seed, which I shall 30. ..Green Cabbage. put into my packages, will, the pur- 31. Mustard-White. chaser will bear in mind, be some of 32. Nasturtium-Dwarf. the white strawberry and some of the 33. Onion. red. After this long story about garden 34. Parsnip. seeds, which, however, is not so exe- 35. Parsley-Curled. crably stupid as the impudent babble 36. Pea-Early-frame. of the Whigs about having " settled 37. Tall Marrowfats.

upon a Speaker for the next House 38. Dwarf Marrowfats, of Commons," I proceed to give a list 39. Radish-Early Scarlet. of the names of my seeds, and of the 40. ...... White Turnip. numbers which are to be put upon the 41. Spinage. parcels ; once more observing, that a 42. Squash (from America, great valarge package of seeds will be sold for

riety). twenty-five shillings, and a small one 43. Strawberry-Cisalpine. for twelve shillings and sixpence. A 44. Turnip-Early-Garden. direction may be sewed on the package in a minute, and it can be sent to any

FLOWER SEEDS. part of the country by the coach, or 45. Canterbury Bells. in any other manner, as the weight, 46. Catch Fly. even of the larger package, is only 47. China-asters. about 16 pounds.

48. Clarkia, (very beautiful).

49. Convovulus-Dwarf. KITCHEN GARDEN SEEDS.

50. Indian Pink. No.

51. Larkspur-Dwarf Rocket. 1. Asparagus.

52. Lupins—Dwarf Yellow. 2. Bean-Broad, or Windsor.

53. Marvel of Peru. 3. ... ... Long-pod.

54. Poppy-Carnation. 4. ...... Early Masagan, .

French.

55.

« ZurückWeiter »