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everything, that we could hope to ac- " the land is bound to obey you complish at so early a period. Above

" For my own part, I will resist it to all things, these divisions attracted the with the last drop of my blood, and

" the last gasp of my existence and attentive and watchful eyes of the peo- " when I feel the hour of my dissoluple; and, it prepared them for express-" tion approaching, I will, like the ing their opinions upon these measures father of Hannibal, take my children with regard to Ireland, which, as every " to the altar, and swear them to eternal man must clearly see, were intended to "

hostility against the invaders of their be merely preparatory to similar mea- country's freedom. Sir, I shall not sures for England, if similar grounds“ detain you by pursuing this question should be discovered ; and that similar “ through the topics which it abundantly grounds will soon be discovered, every “offers. I should be proud to think must be convinced, who ob

my name might be handed down to how things stand this posterity in the same roll with those very day, the 14. of Februnry; for, " disinterested patriots who have sucwhy are the measures to be adop- cessfully resisted the enemies of their ed; because the honourable Member“ country—successfully I trust it will for Dublin and many others, propose "be-in all events I have my exceeding that tbere shall be a repeal of the “ great reward—I shall bear in my Union ; the repeal of un act of Parlia-" heart the consciousness of having ment, of only thirty-tivo years' standing, “ done my duty, and in the hour of while the people of England are de- " death I shall not be haunted by the manding the repeal of an Act of Para“ reflection of having basely sold or liament of a hundred and seventeen years' meanly abandoned the liberties of my standing. But more of this presently, “ native land. Can every man who and let us now hear what were the opi-“ gives his vote on the other side this nions of the present Lord Chancellor of " night lay his hand upon his heart and Ireland, 'with regard to this “ funda- “ make the same declaration ? I hope mental and sacred compact," as it is “ so, it will be well for his own peacecalled. What did he (who was then a “the indignation and abhorrence of his nember of the Irish Parliament) say, countrymen will not accompany him when that Act of Parliament was under " through life, and the curses of his discussion? These were his words : children will not follow him to his “ Sir, I, in the most express terms,

gruve." deny the competency of Parliament It would be waste of time and of " to do this act. I warn you, do not paper to bestow commentary on this ; dare to lay your hand on the constitu

and, it

only necessary to state, that I tell you, that, if circum- this same man joined the GRENVILLES stanced as you are, you pass this act, and Whigs in 1806 ; that he came in “ it will be a nullity, and that no man again with Canning ; that he was then “ in Ireland will be bound to obey it. I made a peer ; that he is now Lord "make the assertion deliberately—I re. Chancellor of Ireland ; that all his sons

peat it; and I call on any man who and near relations are either in the “ hears me, to take down, my words ; church, or in some other way of receiv“ you have not been elected for this ing great emoluments ; that whether

purpose--you are appointed to make he took them to the altar to swear laws, not legislatures—you are ap- eternal hostility to the union, we do not "pointed to act under the constitution, know; but that we do know that, if “ not to alter it-you are appointed to additional powers be granted for carry: “exercise the functions of legislators ing on the government of Ireland, this " and not to transfer them--and if you very man will be the chief depository of do so your act is a dissolution of the those powers, which are avowedly in

government--you resolve society into tended to stifle even any discussion "its original elements, and no man in with regard to that very union, to

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eternal hostility to which, he said he / upon the records of Parliament, his would swear his children, and the sup- reprobation of the Septennial Bill, the porting of which, he said, would cause repeal of which he, in his petition, of every supporter's children to follow him 1793, stated amongst the great objects of with curses to the grave.

a reform of the House of Commons. Now, was it too much to require a Oh, God! one loses one's breath in atfew days to deliberate before we gave tempting to utter these things ! our assent to put additional powers Let any one point out, then, if he into the hands of such men ? I put can, any ground for the giving

" addithis question to the justice of my read-tional powers” in Ireland, which will ers: I ask them, how they would like not apply equally well for giving to have such measures adopted with “ additional powers” in England, the regard to themselves ? And now I have moment a petition is heard of for the to tell then, that there is just as good repeal of the Septennial Bill; and such ground for additional powers” in petitions will be carried to the House England, as there is for “ additional very soon. Here is another set of powers” in Ireland ; and while I make “ repealers ;' and therefore we must this assertion good, I beg their attention have another “ Additional-power Bill,

proposed, too, to those, a very large What are the repealers asking for? portion of whom are positively pledged Why, the repeal of an act of Parlia- io vote for such repeal! This is enough ment, which they allege to be in- for the present upon the subject of Irejurious to Ireland.' And what are the land; and, it may reconcile those who people of England asking for, what are “ tired of the talk about Ireland,” is the city of London asking for ? to think a little more of the matter. If Why, amongst other things, for Apothe wearisomness arose out of the REPEAL OF THE SEPTENNIAL question of the imports and exports," BILL, which is a hundred and seven- let it be recollected, that that matter teen years old, while the Act of Union was not stirred by those who opposed with Ireland is only thirty years old. the address; let it be recollected, that Upon what ground is there not a simi- it was stirred up by Mr. Richards and larity between the two cases ? The Mr. TancrED, who brought it forward two cases are, in all respects, as nearly to prove that the union had been good parallel as possible. We all know how instead of being bad; and, in effect, to injurious the Septennial Bill has been justify the proposition for giving “adto the whole kingdom ; and sball we ditional powers." All these arguments, not listen to the Irish, while they state about " imports and exports," were anthe injuries which they say the Act of swered by my honourable and unanUnion has inflicted upon Ireland ? Se- swerable colleague, Mr. Fielden. Let verely as the Act of Union was repro.. the public recollect this. Before I go bated by the present Lord Chancellor further, the address which I mored as of that country, the Septennial Bill was an amendinent upon the address of the as severely reprobated by many mem- Ministers, I shall insert : bers of the then Parliament in England, “ Most Gracious SOVEREIGN-We, who called it a daring usurpation of your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subthe people's rights, who thereupon "jects, the Commons of the United quitted the House, and who never en- Kingdom of Great Britain and Iretered it again. Curious, and interest-" and, in Parliament assembled, ex® ingly curious, also, while the person press to your Majesty our humble who is the chief of the Government in " thanks for your Majesty's most graIreland, reprobated the Act of Union in “cious speech from the throne. the manner that we have just seen, the “We thank your Majesty for the inperson (Lord Grey) who is at the head “ formation which your Majesty has of the administration in England, has been graciously pleased to communigiven us in black and white, and placed “cate to us relative to those proceed

to me.

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one serves

on

everything, that we could hope to ac- the land is bound to obey you

For complish at so early a period. Above my own part, I will resist it to all things, these divisions attracted the

“the last gasp of my existence and

“ with the last drop of my blood, and attentive and watchful eyes of the peo- " when I feel the hour of my dissoluple; and, it prepared them for express" tion approaching, I will, like the ing their opinions upon these measures father of Hannibal, take

any

children with regard to Ireland, which, as every " to the altar, and swear them to eternal man must clearly see, were intended to "hostility against the invaders of their be merely preparatory to similar mea- " country's freedom. Sir, I shall not sures for England, if similar grounds" detain you by pursuing this question should be discovered ; and that similar “ through the topics which it abundantly grounds will soon be discovered, every “offers. I should be proud to think must be convinced, who ob- "

my name might be handed down to how things stand this " posterity in the same roll with those very day, the 14. of Februnry; for, " disinterested patriots who have sucwhy are the measures to be adop:- " cessfully resisted the enemies of their ed, because the honourable Member“ country—successfully I trust it will for Dublin and many others, propose "be-in all events I have my exceeding that tbere shall be repeal of the "

great reward—I shall bear in my Union ; the repeal of un act of Parlia-" heart the consciousness of having ment, of only thirty-two years' standing, “ done my duty, and in the hour of while the people of England are de- " death I shall not be haunted by the manding the repeal of an Act of Par- “ reflection of having basely sold or liament of a hundred and seventeen years' “ meanly abandoned the liberties of my standing. But more of this presently, “ native land. Can every man who and let us now hear what were the opi- gives his vote on the other side this nions of the present Lord Chancellor of "night lay his hand upon his heart and Ireland, 'with regard to this " funda- " make the same declaration? I hope mental and sacred compact," as it is “ so, it will be well for his own peacecalled. What cid he (who was then a “ the indignation and abhorrence of his miember of the Irish Parliament) say, s countrymen will not accompany him when that Act of Parliament was under “ through life, and the curses of his discussion ? These were his words : children will not follow him to his

“ Sir, I, in the most express terms, “ deny the competency of Parliament It would be waste of time and of

to do this act. I warn you, do not paper to bestow commentary on this; “ dare to lay your hand on the constitu. and, it is only necessary to state, that " tion. I tell you, that, if circum- this same man joined the GRENVILLES “ stanced as you are, you pass this act, and Whigs in 1806; that he came in " it will be a nullity, and that no man again with CANNING ; that he was then “ in Ireland will be bound to obey it. I made a peer ; that he is now Lord “make the assertion deliberately—I re. Chancellor of Ireland ; that all his sons

peat it; and I call on any man who and near relations are either in the “ hears me, to take down my words; church, or in son.e other way of receiv

you have not been elected for this ing great emoluments; that whether purpose--you are appointed to make he took them to the altar to swear laws, not legislatures—you are ap- eternal hostility to the union, we do not pointed to act under the constitution, know; but that we do know that, if

not to alter it--you are appointed to additional powers be granted for carry“ exercise the functions of legislators ing on the government of Ireland, this " and not to transfer them--and if you very man will be the chief depository of do so your act is a dissolution of the those powers, which are avowedly in

government--you resolve society into tended to stifle even any discussion "its original elements, and no man in with regard to that very union, to

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eternal hostility to which, he said he / upon the records of Parliament, his would swear his children, and the sup- reprobation of the Septennial Bill, the porting of which, he said, would cause repeal of which he, in his petition, of every supporter's children to follow him 1793, stated amongst the great objects of with curses to the grave.

a reform of the House of Commons. Now, was it too much to require a Oh, God! one loses one's breath in ate few days to deliberate before we gave tempting to utter these things ! our assent to put additional powers Let any one point out, then, if he into the hands of such men? I put can, any ground for the giving “ addi. this question to the justice of my read- tional powers” in Ireland, which will ers: I ask them, how they would like not apply equally well for giving

to have such measures adopted with additional powers” in England, the 819 regard to themselves? And now I have moment a petition is heard of for the

to tell then, that there is just as good repeal of the Septennial Bill; and such wits ground for additional powers” in petitions will be carried to the House hadi England, as there is for additional very soon. Here is another set of

powers” in Ireland ; and while I make “ repealers ;' and therefore we must this assertion good, I beg their attention have another “ Additional-power Bill,

proposed, too, to those, a very large What are the repealers asking for? portion of whom are positively pledged of br Why, the repeal of an act of Parlia- io vote for such repeal! This is enough e hang ment, which they allege to be in- for the present upon the subject of Ireedi bre jurious to Ireland. And what are the land; and, it may reconcile those who solid people of England asking for, what are “ tired of the talk about Ireland,"

is the city of LONDON asking for to think a little more of the matter. JE

Why, amongst other things, for Arthe wearisomness arose out of the side REPEAL OF THE SEPTENNIAL question of the imports and exports, hearts

BILL, which is a hundred and seven- let it be recollected, that that matter teen years old, while the Act of Union was not stirred by those who opposed with Ireland is only thirty years old. the address ; let it be recollected,

that ence ce Upon what ground is there not a simi- it was stirred up by Mr. Richards and PANTE Jarity between the two cases ?

The Mr. TANCRED, who brought it forward two cases are, in all respects, as nearly to prove that the union had been good un to parallel as possible. We all know how instead of being bad ; and, in effect, to

injurious the Septennial Bill has been justify the proposition for giving “ad-
to the whole kingdom; and shall we ditional powers." All these arguments,
not listen to the Irish, while they state about " imports and exports,” were an-
the injuries which they say the Act of swered by my honourable and unan-
Union has inflicted upon Ireland ? Se- swerable colleague, Mr. Frelden. Let
verely as the Act of Union was repro.. the public recollect this. Before I go
bated by the present Lord Chancellor further, the address which I moved as
of that country, the Septennial Bill was an amendment upon the address of the
as severely reprobated by many mem- Ministers, I shall insert :
bers of the then Parliament in England, “ Most Gracious SOVEREIGN-We,
who called it a daring usurpation of your Majesty's dutiful and loyal sub-
the people's rights, who thereupon “jects, the Commons of the United
quitted the House, and who never en- Kingdom of Great Britain and Ire-
tered it again. Curious, and interest- land, in Parliament assembled, ex-
ingly curious, also, while the person press to your Majesty our humble
who is the chief of the Government in " thanks for your Majesty's most gra-
Ireland, reprobated the Act of Union in “cious speech from the throne.
the manner that we have just seen, the “We thank your Majesty for the in-
person (Lord Grey) who is at the head “ formation which your Majesty has
of the administration in England, has been graciously pleased to communi-
given us in black and white, and placed “ cate to us relative to those proceed-

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ings which your Majesty, in virtue off“ most important matter will be so oryour constitutional and just preroga- " dered and settled by our endeavours, tive, has caused to be adopted with re. “ that peace and happiness, truth and

gard to Portugal, Belgium, and Hol-" justice, religion and piety, may be “ land : and, being perfectly assured" established amongst us for all gené" that every act of your Majesty with!“ rations. regard to those countries will proceed “ While we humbly present to your " from that anxious solicitude with " Majesty our most grateful thanks for

your Majesty has constantly evinced " having been graciously pleased to

to promote the interests of your duti- “ assure us that your Majesty has di"ful people, and to maintain the ho. " rected the estimates for the service of

nour of the kingdom we give your " the ensuing year to be framed with

Majesty our assurance, that we shall “ the most anxious attention to economy; “ receive with the greatest respect,

• and while we assure your Majesty * and shall bestow our best and most " that nothing shall be wanting on our “ sedulous attention upon, those various “ part to reward habits of industry and

papers relating to the affairs of Hol-j“ promote good order amongst the la“ land and Belgium, which your Ma-" bouring classes of the community,

jesty has been graciously pleased to “ our bounden duty to our constituents, “ intimate that your Majesty has given as well as to your Majesty, compels “ directions to be laid before us.

us to express to your Majesty our “ We assure your Majesty, that, with deep regret that your Majesty regard to the charters of the Bank of " should not have been advised graEngland and the East India Company,“ ciously to suggest to us

to conwe shall enter with care and diligence ** sider of the means of lightening the

on a revision of those establishments ; “ numerous and heavy burdens which 66 and that the best of our endeavours are a discouragement to that industry, “ will be employed to arrive at such a " and which so cruelly oppress those 6. decision as shall be best calculated to “ meritorious and suffering classes ; and

secure real and solid public credit, as we assure your Majesty that we will, o well as to promote the general pros- “ with all diligence and zeal, proceed “ perity and power of your Majesty's" to an investigation of the causes which “ kingdom.

“ have produced those burdens and “Well knowing, and most acutely " their consequent sufferings, and to “ feeling, the sorrowful effects of the pre- " the adoption of measures which shall, sent mode of maintaining the clergy" in our judgment, be calculated to proof the established church, both in “ duce effectual and permanent relief.

England and Ireland, we are pecu- “ Most sincerely do we participate

liarly grateful to your Majesty for “ with your Majesty in that pain which “having suggested to us the making of your Majesty's paternal solicitude for

very great and extensive alterations " the welfare of your people has in" with regard to the temporalities of " duced your Majesty graciously to ex" that church ; and it is with particular press with regard to the disturbances “ earnestness that we beg your Majesty in Ireland; and we assure your Ma

to be assured, that we shall enter jesty that we shall be ready, at all “ upon the task with all the patience," times, to adopt any constitutional mea“ all the diligence, and all the absence sures that may be necessary for con" of passion and of prejudice, which trolling and punishing the disturbers " the interesting and momentous sub-" of the public peace, and for preserv“ject so imperiously demands; and chat" ing and strengthening those ties which we confidently hope, that the result " connect the two countries in indisso“ of our consultations will tend to the “ luble bonds of loyalty to your Majesty, “good of the church, the safety, ho- “deeming, as we do, a separation of the

nour, and welfare of your Majesty two countries to be fraught with deand

your kingdom ; aäd that this struction to the peace, security, and

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