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acts of aggression committed by our our independence rest, in some mea. cruizers on the coast of America, from, sure, upon the will of those foreign na'apparently, no other motive than that tions; and will compel us to introduce of rapacity or of insolence, which our a system of taxation incompatible with Government had not the wisdom to our peace and our happiness. And, foresee or the justice to repress. These without a navy capable of coping with "acts of aggression, and particularly the Great Britain on the seas, to have a unjust impressment of native American navy at all will only be to treasure up seamen, produced the late war, which for ourselves mortification, and the added seventy millions to our debt, and mockery of the world. yielded us so plentiful a harvest of dis- If these were, and are, the opinions grace. But, a very large part of the of the people in general throughout the solid heads in America have always united states, the southern and westviewed this navy with dislike and very ern states have had particular ground of great suspicion. Jefferson, Maddison, dislike to this navy, in which they have and Bthers, yielded to the popular cry seen little other than the means of agproduced by the wrongs of the im- grandizing the northern states, and pressed Americans; but they, as well adding to their power over the southern as all the sensible men in the country, and western states ; for, in fact, the saw the danger of this captivating be- navy belongs exclusively to the northern ginning of a showy and expensive Go- states, and its great purpose is to pro"vernment. A very sensible man in New tect those interests in which the southYork, standing along with me, and see- ern and western states do not particiing a little naval youth strut hy us both, pate. upright as if he had swallowed a cur- Thus, then, my Lord, I have done tain-rod, with a cockaded hat on his head, myself the honour to lay before your and a silver-hilted dirk belted round his Lordship as clear a view as I am able body, and a couple of yellow tassels upon of the real causes of this resistance on his shoulders, said, “Ah! there goes the part of South Carolina, the principle one of our defenders.“Well," said of which resistance, you will please to I,“ but they did defend you.” To which perceive, the President by no means he replied, that his country wanted no denies to be just, supposing the necesdefence but the arms of its farmers ; sary degree of oppression to exist. that any other species of defence must Whether the tariff-laws do amount to put too much power into the hands of that degree of oppression, I leave it to the Government; and that, in the end, the better judgment of your Lordship a standing navy must lead to a standing to decide ; and I will now, in concluarmy; that these must lead to great sion, respectfully offer you a few observa

and permanent taxes, and that these tions on my formerly delivered opinions would produce disunion or slavery. Ion American manufactures and on the

do not hazard going a particle beyond American navy; because, I am aware the truth in saying, that this is the opi- that you will reinember, that I expressed nion of nineteen-twentieths of the pro- my pleasure at the passing of the heavy prietors of the land in the United tariff-law, and that I repeatedly called States, who, adhering to the opinions of upon the Americans to build ships Mr. Jefferson, of forty years ago, say, and to cast cannons.” But, these, as What is the use of a navy, unless we be touching the old' charge of“ inconsisable by that navy to control the power tency,and as touching, in a very tenof Great Britain on the seas; anı, to do der part, the interests and honour of that, whence are to come the means England, is high matter," and must without loading ourselves with internal form the subject of another letter to taxes enormous ? For, to effect our your Lordship, from "purpose' by foreign aid and alliances, Your Lordship’s most obedient, will involve us in treaties and obligie

and most humble servant, tions prodigiously expensive; will make

WM. COBBETT.

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THE SPEAKER.

by, an extraordinary slip of discretion in one,

of his generation. And he was quite right; I was in hopes, that no more would for would any assembly, actuated by a be said about the appointment of the true economical spirit, award to the 'pos

sessor of those lord-of-the-bed-chamber Speaker, until the House should as

qualities, which constitute the utmost i semble, and make its free choice, un- amount of his merits, so exorbitant a recom

anticipated by anybody; but the Courier ! pence of 4,0001. a year for two lives? Assu

newspaper, of the 15. instant, will not redly the men who now hold the purse-strings d have it thus : it will have the matter mate of public servants, and their proper re

of the nation, will form a very different estisettled beforehand, as the reader will see muneration. Some advantage may be taken

from the extract which I make from the by surprise, upon the House of Commons · " Courier of that date:

commencing its functions; but Ministers

would do well to pause, ere they commit We understand that it is finally and con

themselves, by proposing to the acceptance of clusively arranged that the Right Hon. Charles such an Assembly, such a President." It may - Manners Sutton will be proposed and supported be that he will be indignantly rejected by the

by the Ministry for the office of Speaker of the sober, practical, earnest-minded men, who new House of Commons. We imagine that will justly require in the individual to whom the communications made upon this subject they shall commit the guidance of their delito Mr. Manners Suttou will of course proceed berations, and control of their proceedings, from Lord Althorp, as the recognised minis- a love of country, a wisdom, a diguity, a libeterial leader in the House of Commons; and rality and elevation of miod not to be found in we believe that the motion for the appointment a retainer of an old boroughmongering conof Mr. Manners Sutton will, in like manner, nexion. If it be that the injudicious praises in conformity to the established practice, bé lavished upon Mr. Sutton by Lord Althorp made by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. It place the Government under any difficulty in is scarcely possible to anticipate that any oppo- , resisting his pretensions, it would be our counsition will be attempted to the re-election of sel that the matter should be left to the discretion Mr. Manners Sutton to this post, the duties of of the House ; por do we think that so to act which he has proved himself by laborious ex

would be in any degree to cede the proper perience pre-eminently qualified to discharge functions of an administration, for we appreBefore I proceed further, let me in- lars, the old plau of managing the House is

hend that in this, and in many other particusert what Dr. BLACK says upon this subo at an end. We expect to see it frequently ject, in answer to the Courier:

controlling the measures of Ministers, spurnNotwithstanding the authoritative state. ing altogether that species of dietation to ment of the Courier of last night, we cannot which it has been hitherto subjected, and aspersuade ourselves that Ministers will be suming a great visitatorial jurisdiction over all guilty of the lâcheté of proposing an invelerate the operations of the executive. It has been Tory, in the person of Mr. Sutton, for the one of the great misfortunes of our past frame. chair of the first reformed House of Commons, of Government, that the House of Commons more especially after bis having taken leave was obliged to take measures and Ministers of the House in a formal speech recorded on in the lump; implicitly acquiesciug in every the Journals, and secured his retired allowance act of the men in office for the time being, or upon the old extravagant scale from all unre- discarding them altogether, and taking to its formed Parliament. The transaction has confidence a set of people diametrically oppo. pery much the air of an intrigue, displaying, site. This is now over.

We shall have no up its success, no little cunning on the part of more threats of resignation on the least check pe Tories; and casting upon the Whiys tiie or resistance ön the part of the House; and mputation of great gullibility and imbecility that false party pride which prompted the reAthey sacrificing two old and faithful asso-signation of a Minister under sueb circum. fiates, Mr. Abercromby and Mr. Littleton, to stauces, will no longer deprive the country of mbom they were bound by every tie of party the services of men in the main useful and honour, and the elevation of either of whom well meaning, although standing in need, as must have been agreeable 'to a majority of all buman agents must, of occasional control the new House. Mr. Manners Sutton himself and correction. labours under no such misapprehension of the probable dispositions towards a person like bim of a body of representatives, chosen, as

Lâcheté means base cowardice ; and the members of the new Parliament have that is not the name for it. The right been, by the free suffrages of the people ; for name is insolent impudence, in proif we are not much misinformed, he has not claiming beforehand what the House of hesitated to assign his mistrust of u reformed Commons shall do. It is a second bave the matter of his pension arranged by chapter of Stanley And Co. It is a an unreformed one; the avowal being, by-the- newspaper-editor saying that the King's

Parliament,

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«acts of aggression committed by our our independence rest, in some meacruizers on the coast of America, from, sure, upon the will of those foreign na'apparently, no other motive than that tions; and will compel us to introduce of rapacity or of insolence, which our a system of taxation incompatible with Government had not the wisdom to our peace and our happiness. And, foresee or the justice to repress. These without a navy capable of coping with acts of aggression, and particularly the Great Britain on the seas, to have a unjust impressment of native American navy at all will only be to treasure up seamen, produced the late war, which for ourselves mortification, and the added seventy millions to our debt, and mockery of the world. yielded us so plentiful a harvest of dis- If these were, and are, the opinions grace. But, à very large part of the of the people in general throughout the solid heads in America have always united states, the southern and westviewed this navy with dislike and very ern states have had particular ground of great suspicion. Jefferson, Maddison, dislike to this navy, in which they have and Bthers, yielded to the popular cry seen little other than the means of agproduced by the wrongs of the im- grandizing the northern states, and pressed Americans; but they, as well adding to their power over the southern as all the sensible men in the country, and western states ; for, in fact, the saw the danger of this captivating be- navy belongs exclusively to the northern ginning of a showy and expensive Go- states, and its great purpose is to provernment. A very sensible man in New tect those interests in which the southYork, standing along with me, and see-ern and western states do not partici. ing a little naval youth strut hy us both, pate. upright as if he had swallowed a cur- Thus, then, my Lord, I have done tain-rod, with a cockaded hat on his head, myself the honour to lay before your and a silver-hilted dirk belted round his Lordship as clear a view as I am able body, and a couple of yellow tassels upon of the real causes of this resistance on - his shoulders, said, “Ah! there goes the part of South Carolina, the principle one of our defenders.” “Well,” said of which resistance, you will please to 1," but they did defend you.” To which perceive, the President by no means he replied, that his country wanted no denies to be just, supposing the necesdefence but the arms of its farmers ; sary degree of oppression to exista that any other species tof defence must Whether the tariff-laws do amount to put too much power into the hands of that degree of oppression, I leave it to the Government; and that, in the end, the better judgment of your Lordship a standing navy must lead to a standing to decide ; and I will now, in conclu- u army; that these must lead to great sion, respectfully offer you a few observa

and permanent taxes, and that these tions on my formerly delivered opinions would produce disunion or slavery. 'I on American manufactures and on the do not hazard going a particle beyond | American navy ; because, I am awarı i the truth in saying, that this is the opi- that you will remember, that I expressed nion of nineteen-twentieths of the pro- my pleasure at the passing of the heavy "prietors of the land in the United turiff-law, and that I repeatedly called States, who, adhering to the opinions of upon the Americans tobuild ships Mr. Jefferson, of forty years ago, say, and to cast cannons.But, these, as What is the use of a navy, unless we be touching the old charge of“ inconsisable by that navy to control the power tency,and as touching, in a very ten"of Great Britain on the seas; and, to do der part, the interests and honour of that, whence are to come the means England, is high matter," and must without loading ourselves with internal form the subject of another letter to taxes enormous ? For, to effect our your Lordship, from purpose by foreign aid and alliances, Your Loriship’s most obedient, will involve us in treaties and obligat

and most humble servant, tions prodigiously expensive; will inake

WM, COBBETT.

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THE SPEAKER.

by, an extraordinary slip of discretion in one

of his generation. And he was quite right; I was in hopes, that no more would for would any assembly, actuated by a be said about the appointment of the true economical spirit, award to the 'pos

sessor of those lord-of-the-bed-chamber Speaker, until the House should

qualities, which constitute the utmost semble, and make its free choice, un- amount of his merits, so exorbitant a recomanticipated by anybody; but the Courier pence of 4,0001. a year for two lives? Assunewspaper, of the 15. instant, will not redly the men who now hold the purse-strings have it thus : it will have the matter of the nation, will form a very different esti

mate of public servants, and their proper re. settled beforehand, as the reader will see muneration. Some advantage may be taken from the extract which I make from the by surprise, upon the House of Commons Courier of that date:

commencing its functions; but Ministers

would do well to pause, ere they commit We understand that it is finally and con

themselves, by proposing to the acceptance of clusively arranged that the Right Hon. Charles such an Assembly, such a President. It may Manners Sutton will be proposed and supported be that he will be indignantly rejected by the by the Ministry for the office of Speaker of the suber, practical, earnest-minded men, who new House of Commons. We imagine that will justly require iu the individual to whom the communications made upon this subject they shall commit the guidance of their delito Mr. Manners Sutton will of course proceed berations, and control of their proceedings, from Lord Althorp, as the recognised minis

a love of country, a wisdom, a diguity, a libeterial leader in the House of Commons; and rality and elevation of miod not to be found in we believe that the motion for the appointment a retainer of an old boroughmongering conof Mr. Manners Sutton will, in like manner, nexion. If it be that the injudicious praises in conformity to the established practice, bé lavished upon Mr. Sutton by Lord Althorpmade by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. It place the Government under any difficulty in is scarcely possible to anticipate that any oppo- resisting his pretensions, it would be our counsition will be attempted to the re-electioù of sel that

the matter should be left to the discretion Mr. Manners Sutton to this post, the duties of of the House ; por do we thiuk that so to act which he has proved himself by laborious ex

would be in any degree to cede the proper ** perience pre-eminently qualified to discharge. Thend that in this, and in many other particu

functions of an administration, for we appreBefore I proceed further, let me in- lars, the old plau of managing the House is sert what Dr. Black says upon this sub- at an end. We expect to see it frequently ject, in answer to the Courier :

controlling the measures of Ministers, spurnNotwithstanding the authoritative state. ing altogether that species of dietation to ment of the Courier of last night, we cannot which it has been hitherto subjected, and asa persuade ourselves that Ministers will be suming a great visitatorial jurisdiction over all guilty of the lâcheté of proposing an invelerate the operations of the executive. It has been Tory, in the person of Mr. Sutton, for the one of the great misfortunes of our past frame. chair of the first reformed House of Commous, of Government, that the House of Commons more especially after his having taken leave was obliged to take measures and Ministers of the House in a formal speech recorded on in the lump; implicitly acquiesciug in every the Journals, and secured his retired allowance act of the men iu office for the time being, or apon the old extravagant scale from an unre- discarding them altogether, and taking to its formed Parliament.

The transaction has confidence a set of people diametrically oppo, kery much the air of an intrigue, displaying, site. This is now over.

We shall have no its success, no little cunning on the part of more throats of resignation on the least check ae Tories; and casting upon the Whigs the or resistance ùn the part of the House; and mputation of great gullibility and imbecility that false party pride which prompted the re-i

they sacrificing two old and faithful asso-signation of a Minister under such circumciates, Mr. Abercromby and Mr. Littleton, to stauces, will no longer deprive the country of whom they were bound by every tie of party the services of men in the main useful and honour, and the elevation of either of whom well meaning, although standing in need, as must have been ayreeable to a majority of all buman agents must, of occasional control the new House. Mr. Manners Sutton bimself and correction. labours under no such misapprehension of the probable dispositious towards a person like him of a body of representatives, chosen, as

Lâcheté means base cowardice ; and the members of the new Parliament have that is not the name for it. The right been, by the free suffrages of the people ; for name is insolent impudence, in proif we are not much misinformed, he has not claiming beforehand what the House of hesitated to assign his mistrust of a reformed Commons shall do. It is a second have the matter of his pension arranged by chapter of STANLEY AND Co. It is a an unreformed obe; the avowal being, by-the- newspaper-editor saying that the King's

Parliament,

servants will have a certain man to be has been said in newspapers; or by me, Speaker of the House of Commons. This who am the legitimate monarch of the is the only thing that I find fault with press, notwithstanding the_rebellious in this case ; and a great deal it is to disposition of my subjects. The House find fault with : and if it were proved has no right at all to consult the prithat the servants of the King had caused vate feelings of any of its members this publication in the Courier, I have upon the subject. It will disgrace itno scruple to say, that the House ought self, and it will be detested by the to address the King to banish them people, instead of being respected and from his councils and his presence. beloved by them, if it begin its operaWith regard to my opinion relative to tions by showing anything like a spirit the fitness of Mr. Manners Sutton to of party. It must get rid of the disbe Speaker of the House, no one will tinctions of Whig and of Tory, or it expect me to give it here; but, as to strangles itself in its birth. The ques. his Toryism, and other circumstances tion will be simply a question of the trumped up here, I trust that the House fitness or the unfitness of the man for will have too much sense to be influ- the post; and, if Mr. MANNERS SUTTON enced by any considerations of that be, upon discussion, found to be the sort ; and really, the Doctor's lamenta- most proper man for the post of any tions at the sacrificing of two old and that shall be offered, base is that memfaithful associates, Mr. ABERCROMBY ber of the House who objects to the “ and Mr. LITTLETON, to whom the appointment of Mr. MANNERS Sutton. “ Ministers are bound by every tie of party honour, and the elevation of “ whom must have been agreeable to a majority of the House;" the Doctor's

CHURCH-RATES. lamentations proceed, one would think, I TAKE the following paragraph from from an acuteness of sorrow that has the Manchester and Salford Advertiser bereft him of his senses ! For, in the of the 12. of January. first place, would the Doctor have a brace of Speakers ? and if every tie of « OLDHAM PETTY SESSIONS. “party honour

binds the Ministers to “ARREARS OF Church-Rates.-One both, both they must have, or break the “ hundred and thirty-five poor persons, tie with regard to one, which would to“ principally working men out of ema certainty break their hearts, so tender“ ployment, were summoned by the are those hearts as to all points of honour. “ collectors of the church-rates for old Well, Doctor! but if it will be “

agree- arrears of this tax. Most of the indiable to a majority of the House" to hare “viduals expressed their willingness one of these gentlemen, why the deuce ".to pay if they had the power. Ivany are you in such a sweat? For, the Devil's of them were old and infirm, and yet take the "new House," I say, if it do “ the magistrate had no authority to not have what is agreeable to a majoriły "exempt them from the rate.” of it! It will be a pretty House, in- It is my constituents who are sufferdeed, if the minority is to beat the ing thus. I have the happiness to be majority !

the representative of sensible, as well as Poh! this is all nonsense : and, this virtuous, people ; and, therefore, they eaves-dropping, about what Mr. Man- have not applied to me, in this case; NERS SUTTON has said about “his for they know that of myself, I can mistrust of a reformed Parliament to do nothing; and they know that nogive him his pension;" I don't like thing can be done for them, except this eaves-dropping. The House will through the means of the House of do well to treat all such stories with Commons. I know of no burden so opdisregard ; and to come to the question pressive as this. It is a new burden, of who shall be Speaker, with minds too; and the Parliament appears never perfectly unbiassed by anything that to have known anything at all about it.

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