The Pamphleteer, Band 2

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Abraham John Valpy
A. J. Valpy., 1813
 

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Seite 194 - copy ' in the technical sense in which that name or term has been used for ages, to signify an incorporeal right to the sole printing and publishing of somewhat intellectual, communicated by letters.
Seite 310 - That this House will, early in the next session of parliament, take into its most serious consideration the state of the laws affecting his Majesty's Roman Catholic subjects...
Seite 67 - Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye ; and then shall thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.
Seite 318 - We must not count with certainty on a continuance of our present prosperity during such an interval ; but unquestionably there never was a time in the history of this country, when, from the situation of Europe, we might more reasonably expect fifteen years of peace, than we may at the present moment.
Seite 305 - Russell moved the House of Commons for leave to bring in a Bill to amend the representation of the people in England and Wales.
Seite 190 - Glory is the reward of science, and those who deserve it, scorn all meaner views...
Seite 212 - Exchequer to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to be by them placed to the account of the commissioners for the reduction of the national debt...
Seite 499 - India, for the purpose of accomplishing those benevolent designs. Provided always, that the authority of the local Governments, respecting the intercourse of Europeans with the interior of the country, be preserved, and that the principles of the British Government, on which the natives of India have hitherto relied for the free exercise of their religion, be inviolably maintained.
Seite 306 - Parliament, as the petition of the " Friends of the People, associated for the purpose of obtaining a Reform in Parliament.
Seite 574 - ... does not measure happiness so much by its own conveniences, as by the miseries of others; and would not be satisfied with being thought a goddess, if none were left that were miserable, over whom she might insult.

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