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The chace she loved; when morn, with doubtful beam,
Came dimly wandering o’er the Bothnic stream,
On Sevo's sounding sides she bent the bow,
And rouzed his forests to his head of snow.
Nor moved the 'maid alone, &c.

FINIS.

ERRATA, VOL. II.

Page 37. line 7. note. For bated heat, read beating heart:

60. 10. text, For Muma, read Moma.
79. 4, note. For dusky, read busky.
120,
16.

For adverting, that to this, read advert-

ing to this, that.
120. 17. For there is, read there are.
151. 8. text. For their friends, read his friends.
161. 10. note. For spirit, read spirits.
162. 10. text. For a desert, read the desert.
289. 4. note. For ab, read ob.
333. 8. For ludus, read ludum.
390. 21. For search, read reach.
403. 12. For sea-rock, read sea-beat rock,

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MAVOR'S UNIVERSAL HISTORY.

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per, 6s.

ON THE FIRST OF NOVEMBER

WAS PUBLISHED, Closely printed in Deiny 18mo. embellished with an HISTORICAL

FRONTISPIECE, designed by BURNEY, Price 4s. 6d. Boards; or elegantly printed on Fine Royal Paper, 6s. Boards,

VOLUME THE FIRST, OF
A UNIVERSAL HISTORY,
ANCIENT AND MODERN;

COMPREHENDING
A GENERAL VIEW OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF EVERY NATION,

KINGDOM, AND EMPIRE IN THE WORLD;
FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PRESENT TIME.

BY WILLIAN MAVOR, LL.D.
VICAR OF HURLEY, IN BERKSHIRE, RECTOR OF STONES FIELD, &c. &c.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR SHERWOOD, NEELY, AND JONES, PATERNOSTER-ROW ;
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CONDITIONS: This valuable Work will be uniformly 49. 6d. Boards, or the fine Royal Pa

printed in Demy 18mo. on good Paper, and completed in Twenty-five Vo Each Volume will be illustrated with an lumes; also a superior Edition, print. Historical Frontispiece, designed and ed uniform with Dr. Maror's Voy. engraved by an eminent Artist, repreAGES and Travels, on fine Royal senting some principal Event; and the Paper.

Whole will be accompanied with a vaA Volume will be published regularly on luable set of Maps. the first Day of every Month, price

ADDRESS. IT was sententionsly observed by Lord Bacon, “that History makes men wise;" a maxim too self-evident to need argument or illustration to support it. It is, io. deed, from the pages of History, that we must derive all that knowledge of experience which regulates the civil, the religious, and the political establishments of moderu Europe. History bolds up to us a mirror, in which we may view the current of human actions from its source to its close. We seem to stand, as it were, upon a lofty eininence, watching the course of some mighty river rolling along with majesty and pride, sometimes broken into torrents, dashing its furious waves against resisting rocks, and sometimes flowing with gevule current, adorning and fertilizing the regions that it waters. The wisdon, indeed, which History gives us, transcends all other in practical utility. But it is not only as philosophers or statesmen ibat the page of history becomes a rich and valuable record to us: 10 a well-regulated mind, it serves as a memorial of moral and religious worth; it serves as a record of the Dia vine dispensations, where we may read the decrees of Providence, and see his will manifested in a long course of events, and his unerring justice and wisdom vindicated in remote results. It is in history that we see the grandeur and decline of empires, the fulfilment of prophecies, and the gradual developerneut of the human mind in those cuuntries where the genius of civilization has successively planted her standard. In History too we find the great scheme of Christian1 revelation unfolded in all i's parts, and every where producing those resu ts which its Divine Founder and his Apostles constantly foretold. Everything, inced, which can be important to

2 man, as a mere temporal being, may be found in History. Had historians nere: written, neither sacred nor profane, we should at this day be in utter and deplorable ignorance of all that has befallen man since the creation of the world. Nay, more--we should be in a state of degraded barbarism, brutalized and lost 10 ai! that knowledge, by which life has been rendered agreeable to ourselves, and accep. table to God.

“Man," says Shakspeare, " is a being of large discourse, looking before and after." But how does he look before, or how does he look after! He looks after him by the aids of those historical monuments which have come down to us, and by which he is enabled to ascertain and fix certain iinmutable principles of human action. Man looks before him too, as the steereman does when sailing upon the wide expanse of waters, surrounded only by the sky and ocean. He anticipates and directs his course by the uuerring dictates of the compass; add the accounts of pas! ages, of departed legislators, of the origin and conclusion of wars and conquests, oi the foundations of governments, of the prosperity and declive of empires, of the doom of tyrants, and of the prosperity of viriuous monarchs, what are all these to the generations that succeed, but a chart and compass, by which they may steer the magnificent vessel of human existence ? Such is the importance of History in its grandest and most philosophical view; but as the humbler vehicle of merely satis. tilying curiosity, and teaching a more selfish wisdom, it is not without strong claims upon our attention. Tusensible, indeed, must that man's heart and mind be, wbo feels no latent wish, no eager curiosity, no instinctive anxiety, as it were, to learn something about the destinies of the countless millions of human beings who have preceded liim; who does not desire to know something about the fate of those mighty nations of the globe which have passed away, and live now only in the page of History; who does not wish to read the transactions in the lives of those seen whose names are emblazoned by the pen of truth, whose virtues still excite the veneration, or whose vices still call for the execration of mankind. To him who hai these feelings, (and what educaied mind can be wholly without them) History pre. sents an inexhaustible source of delight and instruction; and every attempt, therefore, to render this source more easily accessible, deserves not only applause, but must command patronage. Relying, iherefore, upon those obvious

grounds of spccess, the present Work is strongly recominended to public attention. It will be found to embrace a complete historical series of events, from the earliest records of time, down to the present period. It is peculiarly adapted for the general reader, as it happily steers a middle course between unsatisfying brevity and prolix diffu. sion. While every thing that is important is retained, much that is merely calcu. lated to satisfy vain and idle speculation is omitted. It contains the history c every ancient and modern nation, and forms therefore a complete library of itself portable in its shape, and yet neat and perspicuous in its type and paper.

Such persons us prefer taking the Work complete, without waiting for the monthly publication,.may have it in twenty-five volumes, price 51. 12. 6d. boards; or of fine royal paper, 71. 10s. boards.

CONTENTS.
VOL.
ANCIENT.

VOL. 1. Antediluvians, Ancient Egypt, and 12. India, the Ottoman Empire, &c. neighbouring Nations

13. Jews, Modern Fgypt, and the other 2. Canaanites, Philistines, and Jews,-.

African Nations
also of the Assyrian and Babylo 14. Africa continued, and Malta
nian Empires

15. Portugal and Spain 3. and 4. Greece

16. Italy 5. 6. and 7. Rome

17. Germany 8. Medes, Persiaus, Pheniciaus, An 18. Ditto continued, Holland, Switret. cient Syrians, &c. &c. &c.

land, and Geneva 9. Pontus, Epirus, Colchis, Iberia, Al. 19. and 20. England bania, &c. &c. &c.

21. Scotland and Ireland MODERN.

22. Russia, Poland, Sweden, Denmuk, 10. Arabs, Turks, and Empires founded

and Prussia
by them in Tartary, and the 23. France and Navarre
Lower Asia, &c.

24. North and South America 11. Moguls and Tartars, China, &c. 25. Index

NAVOR’S VOYAGES AND TRAVLT.

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Including the most interesting Records of Navigators and Travellers, FROM THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA BY COLUMBUS, IN THE YEAR

1492, TO LORD VALENTIA.

BY WILLIAM MAVOR, LL.D. Rector of Stonesfield, in Oxfordshire; Vicar of Hurley, in Berkshire; Chaplain to the Earl of Moira and the Earl of Dumfries; Honorary Member of the

Board of Agriculture ; and Author of the Universal History.

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ADDRESS. ONE of the most remarkable features by which modern times are distinguished from ancient, is that spirit of maritime discovery which has prevailed during three centuries, and that consequent extension of human knowledge which has been engrafted upon the accounts of travellers into remote regions of the earth. The geographical learning of the Greeks and Romans was confined wholly to a small part of the coast of Africa, to a considerable portion of Asia, and to a somewhat more considerable portion of Europe; but the vast and boundless tracts of the new world were wholly unknown to them, and even that knowledge which they possessed of the other divisions of the globe, was very far from being precise or accurate. The most monstrous fables disfigured their accounts, and credulity received, with undistinguishing eagerness, truth and fable, wisdom and error. It was reserved for modern times to create, as it were, a new region in the world of knoiyledge; it was reserved for modern times 'to enlarge our acquaintance with human nature, by carrying our researches intu modes of life original and distinct, and separated in all their characteristics froin all the systems of civilized Europe. Nor is the kuowledge of wian the only science that has been extended by the progress of maritime discovery. They have all benefited by the event, in consequence of

the various information that has been obtained relatively to the productions of na. ture in the animal, in the mineral, and in the vegetable kingdoms.

Such are the advantages which have been derived by the more exalted pursuits of the human mind, from the enterprising pursuits of travellers in foreign and before unknown countries. But the amusement and instruction of the general reader has been no less advanced. It is not easy to conceive any species of reading more fascinating in itself, more calculated to give a man a general huld upon conversation, or more formed to delight the fancy, than that of Voyages and Travels. They form a most entertaining and important branch of study, considered as comprehending a description of foreign countries, and as displaying the wonders of nature in remote regiops; as tracing the intellectual character, and marking the variation of customs and the shades of national manners; as describing the productions of art, and comparing the progressive improvements of mankind; as delineating the pbysical characters of the habitable globe, and displaying man, from the refined and polished European, to the dull and barbarous African; and again subdividing our inquiries into minute analogies, which escape the eye of general observation and extensive research. These are among the pleasing benefits which belong to the perusal of the works of travellers. We gather all their fruit, and incur none of their bazard: we feast upon the viands which they prepare, but know only in descriptiou the perils they have er.countered in procuring them. This happy and peculiar pri. vilege has been poetically dwelt upon by Cowper :

“ He travels and expatiates, as the bee
From flow'r to flow'r, so be from land to land;
The manners, customs, policy of all,
Pay contribution to the store he gleans;
He sucks intelligence in every cline,
And spreads the honey of his deep research
At his return--a rich repast for me.
He travels, and I luo. I tread his deck,
Ascend his topmast, through his peering eyes
Discover countries, with a kindred heart
Suffer his woes, and share in his escapes ;
While fancy, like the finger of a clock,

Runs the great circuit, and is still at home.” If such be the general and undisputed advantages arising from the perusal of Voyages and Travels, little surely need be said in commendation of that plan, whose prosessed object it is to place these advantages within the reach of every individual, at a small and gradual expence. Confident, therefore, no less in the value, than in the importance of the present work, the patronage of the Public is warmly solicited. It will be found to contain an accurate digest of all the works that have hitherto appeared, from the era of Columbus down to the commencement of the nin, teenth century. Among others, are comprised the voyages of Aasou, Byron, Carteret, Cook, Thunberg, and Vancouver; and the travels of Addison, Bruce, Maupertius, Smollett, Brydone, Sonnini, Denon, Liancourt, Mackenzie, Valentia, and others: thus embracing a series more extensive than ever has been offered to the Public in any similar collection.

The contents of the several volumes will best illustrate the nature, utility, and value of this new Edition. VOL.

VOYAGES.
1. Explanation of Nautical Terms 1. Magellan's Voyage round the World
Columbus's First, Second, Third, and Sir F. Drake's Voyage round the
Fourtb Voyages

World
Cabots' (J. and S.) Voyages

Sir J. Lancaster's Voyage to the
Americus Vesputius's Voyages

East Indies DeGama's First and Second Voyages Sir H. Middleton's Voyage to the : to the East Indies

Red Sea and Surat
De Cabral's Voyage to the East, James's Voyage for the Discovery of
Indies

the N. W. Passage to India

VOL.

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