A Digest of International Law: As Embodied in Diplomatic Discussions, Treaties and Other International Agreements, International Awards, the Decisions of Municipal Courts, and the Writings of Jurists ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906 - 939 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

Netherlands 865
20
Egypt 820
28
France
29
The Holy See 18
39
Nature and functions 492
41
2 Military occupation 21
46
General principles 27
47
Penalty 1263
49
Mode of presentation
54
Burden of proof 1238
66
Recognition of new States
67
Recognition of belligerencyContinued
70
Acts of insurgents
73
Of new States
77
Argentine Republic 781
91
The acquisition and loss of territory
108
Ottoman Porte
110
AustriaHungary 782
114
Treaty of 1830 86
116
Conquest 1156
128
Spain 46
131
Central America 50
140
Venezuela 52
149
Recognition of belligerency
164
Analogues of contraband
165
Prisoners of
166
Enemy character
167
Vessels
174
A belligerent right 1266
188
Acts not prohibited
193
End of war 1163
197
Extraterritorial crime
200
Breach of blockade
204
Treatment of the wounded 1134
207
Coast warfare
210
Hayti 954
216
State aided and compulsory emigration
220
Landing of submarine cables
227
Mexico
237
Laws of various countries
242
Development of doctrine
255
Territorial expansion of United States
256
Territorial expansion of United StatesContinued
257
Treaty relations 821
273
Enforcement of neutral duties
277
Real estate protocol 1874 868
286
Cessation of blockade
289
Supremacy of territorial sovereign
291
Prescription 88
294
To whom issued
309
Claim of impressment
317
Vessels controlled by insurgents
329
Germany 823
331
Great Britain
332
Report by Mr Dainese 1852
333
Ameliorations
350
ClaytonBulwer treaty
351
Corinth Canal
370
Naturalization
377
Naturalization not retroactive
401
Nationality of married women
408
Cutting of cables 1176
409
Effect of judicial sentences
414
Naturalization internationally ineffective as to absent family
416
Double allegiance
426
Limitations as to trial
439
Commercial intercourse
463
Civil war cases 1144
465
XVII Corporations
485
3 International copyright 182
490
International American conferences 969
496
H Doc 551 m
497
Chapter IX
502
Applications
503
1 Persons born in the United States
515
Duration of passports
523
Treaty of peace 17823
531
Disabilities
541
Military service
547
Guano Islands
555
War measures
559
Extradition a national act
579
1 Negotiations 824
582
Treaties
589
Political offenses
604
Exchange of ratifications
609
Evidence
611
Chapter V
612
Whale fisheries 169
614
Expense
620
Chaiter XXIII
623
The Mississippi
625
Prize money and bounty
633
Rights and duties of ministers
642
Privateers
643
INTEROCEANIC COMMUNICATIONS
652
Relations with the Navy
656
Straits
658
Straits of Magellan
664
Police regulations
669
Ceremonial
681
Limited 1102
692
Classes and titles
696
Grounds of intervention
697
Marginal
698
Chapter VIII
699
Private no longer admissible 1104
700
3 Discussion as to Cuba 140
706
Freedom of the seas
708
Algiers 784
716
Powers and duties 1
717
6 Rule as to fisheries 149
722
Shipping and seamen
725
Declarations of maritime
733
Power to make
734
Power to settle
737
Conception
739
Morocco
785
Tripoli
786
Tunis
787
Belgium
788
Bolivia
789
Brazil
790
Central America 1 Costa Rica
791
Honduras
792
Guatemala
793
Nicaragua
794
Salvador
795
Chile
796
China 1 Treaty of 1844
797
Treaties of 1858
798
Treaty of 1868
799
Immigration and other treaties 18801894
800
Taxes
801
Industries
802
Travel
803
Missionary privileges and protection
804
Purchase of land
805
Treaty ports and foreign settlements
806
Leases to European powers
807
Boxer movement 1 Siege and relief of legations
808
2 Negotiations for settlement
809
Practice of protection
810
Open door policy 1 The Hay agreement
811
2 AngloGerman agreement
812
Territorial integrity neutrality
813
Colombia
814
Congo
815
Corea
816
Denmark
817
Dominican Republic 818
818
Ecuador 819
819
1 ilistorical sketch 826
826
2 Particular stipulations
827
MonroePinkney and cognate negotiations
828
Treaty of Ghent
829
Treaty of 1815
830
Naval forces on Great Lakes 1817 831
831
Fisheries convention 1818
832
Indemnity for slaves 1822
833
WebsterAshburton treaty
834
Oregon treaty
835
ClaytonBulwer treaty 836
836
Reciprocity treaty of 1854
837
Treaty of Washington 1871
839
Canadian relations
840
The Queens jubilee
841
Greece
842
Hayti
843
Italy
844
Japan 1 Early attempts to negotiate
845
Perrys successful mission
846
Harris treaties and Japanese embassy
847
Domestic disturlmnces
848
Affair of Shimonoseki
849
Convention of 1866 and treaty revision
850
Emancipation of Japan 851
851
Liberia 1 Declarations of American policy
852
Treaty of 1862 Art VIII
853
Relations with Great Britain
854
Relations with France
855
Madagascar
856
Mexico 1 Relations 18251848
857
Treaty of GuadalupeHidalgo
858
Mesilla and later treaties
859
Domestic disturbances intervention
860
Later relations
861
Zona Libra or Free Zone
862
Crossing of border by cattle
863
H Doc 551 v
865
Extradition treaty
869
Educational eleemosynary and religious institutions
870
Schools
871
Sale of books 872 j 8 Freedom of worship
873
Armenian difficulties
874
Various topics
875
Paraguay
876
Persia
877
Peru
878
Portugal
879
Russia
880
Samoan Islands
881
Siam
882
Treaty of October 27 1795
883
Treaty of February 22 1819
884
Convention of February 17 1834
885
Reciprocity agreement 1891
886
Treaty of December 10 1898
887
Caroline Islands
888
Sweden and Norway
889
Switzerland
890
Tahiti
891
Tonga
892
Uruguay
893
Venezuela
894
Zanzibar
895
Multipartite treaties
896
Political intervention 1 General principles
897
Policy of nonintervention 1 Declarations of policy
898
2 The French revolution
899
3 Spain and her colonies
900
4 Greek independence
901
5 Hungarian revolution
902
6 ChilePeruvian war
903
7 Sympathy with liberal political struggles
904
8 Hospitality to political refugees
905
1 Jurisdiction and procedure
914
Good offices
920
Questions of asylum
924
Early expressions of American policy
927
Piracy
930
Monroes message December 2 1823
936
Definitions
938
Urheberrecht

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Seite 582 - Article. XI. Canada acceding to this Confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into and entitled to all the advantages of this union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States/
Seite 624 - The navigation of the river Mississippi, from its source to the ocean, shall forever remain free and open to the subjects of Great Britain and the citizens of the United States." In 1790 the diplomatic representative of the United States at Madrid was instructed to urge upon the Spanish Government the immediate opening of the river.
Seite 621 - navigable in fact when they are used, or are susceptible of being used, in their ordinary condition, as highways for commerce, over which trade and travel are or may be conducted in the customary modes of travel on water." And again (p. 442) : " It is not. however, as Chief Justice Shaw said, '21
Seite 528 - II. Spain will cede to the United States the island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and also an island in the Ladrones to be selected by the United States. ARTICLE III. The United States will occupy and hold the city, bay and
Seite 31 - denominated domestic dependent nations. They occupy a territory to which we assert a title independent of their will, which must take effect in point of possession when their right of possession ceases. Meanwhile they are in a state of pupilage. * * * They and their country are considered by foreign nations, as well as by ourselves, as
Seite 35 - The rights of the original inhabitants were in no instance entirely disregarded, but were necessarily, to a considerable extent, impaired. They were admitted to be the rightful occupants of the soil, with a legal as well as just claim to retain possession of it, and to use it according to their own discretion; but,
Seite 289 - The Government of Spain hereby relinquishes all claim of sovereignty over and title to Cuba. "The Government of Spain hereby cedes to the United States the Island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and also the Island of Guam, in the
Seite 784 - to take fish on the coast of Newfoundland and on the coasts, bays, and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America, and also the " liberty " to dry and cure fish, subject to the conditions stated in the article. When the plenipotentiaries of the United
Seite 418 - and felt by the whole civilized world would be outraged if private property should be generally confiscated, and private rights annulled. The people change their allegiance; their relation to their ancient sovereign is dissolved: but their relations to each other, and their rights of property remain undisturbed. "This
Seite 783 - the following article was agreed on: "ARTICLE "III. It is agreed that the people of the United States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland; also in the Gulph of St. Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of

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