Physic and Physicians: A Medical Sketch Book, Exhibiting the Public and Private Life of the Most Celebrated Medical Men, of Former Days ; with Memories of Eminent Living London Physicians and Surgeons

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Longman, Orme, Brown, 1839
 

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Seite 190 - Hermes, or unsphere The spirit of Plato to unfold What worlds, or what vast regions hold The immortal mind, that hath forsook Her mansion in this fleshly nook...
Seite 2 - Not far from that most celebrated place, Where angry Justice shows her awful face ; Where little villains must submit to fate, That great ones may enjoy the world in state ; There stands a dome, majestic to the sight, And sumptuous arches bear its oval height ; A golden globe, placed high with artful skill, Seems, to the distant sight, a gilded pill...
Seite 129 - PRINCESS whom he had corresponded with in cherry-juice, he showed in a moment what he was. He answered that there was nothing at all in that, because having been (as every body knew) imprisoned in a high tower, and being debarred the use of ink, he had no other means of correspondence but by writing his letters in cherry-juice, and throwing them into a river which surrounded the tower, where the Princess received them in a boat. There existed, of course, no tower, no imprisonment, no writing in cherry-juice,...
Seite 63 - Skrine the least soil of breath on the bright mirror he held to his mouth ; then each of us, by turns, examined his arm, heart, and breath, but could not, by the nicest scrutiny, discover the least symptom of life in him. We reasoned a long time about this odd appearance, as well as we could, and...
Seite 62 - Skrine held a clear looking-glass to his mouth. I found his pulse sink gradually, till at last I could not feel any by the most exact and nice touch. Dr. Baynard could not feel the least motion in his heart, nor Mr.
Seite 114 - I am a man of desperate fortunes, that is, a man whose friends are dead: for I never aimed at any other fortune than in friends. As soon as I had sent my last letter, I received a most kind one from you, expressing great pain for my late illness at Mr. Cheselden's. I conclude you...
Seite 144 - English captain, whose history no one knew, as he had been in chains forty years. He was thought to be one of the most furious among them ; his keepers approached him with caution, as he had in a fit of fury killed one of them on the spot with a blow from his manacles. He was chained more rigorously than any of the others. Pinel entered his cell unattended, and calmly said...
Seite 371 - God, the immortality of the soul, and a future state of rewards and punishments have been esteemed useful engines of government.
Seite 144 - You may do what you like with them," said he, " but I fear you will become their victim." Pinel instantly commenced his undertaking. There were about fifty whom he considered might, without danger to the others, be unchained; and he began' by releasing twelve, with the sole precaution of having previously prepared the same number of strong waistcoats, with long sleeves, which could be tied behind the back, if necessary. The first man on whom the...
Seite 152 - Temple, with such a dejection of spirits, as none but they who have felt the same, can have the least conception of: Day and night I was upon the rack, lying down in horror, and rising up in despair.

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