The Philosophy of Intimidation; Or, Historical Sketches on the Elective Franchise, Its Defects and Remedies

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Shepherd & Aitchison, 1856 - 185 Seiten

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Seite 125 - The Lord bless thee, and keep thee : the Lord make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee : the Lord lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.
Seite 4 - The true reason of requiring any qualification, with regard to property, in voters, is to exclude such persons as are in so mean a situation that they are esteemed to have no will of their own.
Seite 129 - Every person who shall directly or indirectly, by himself or by any other person on his behalf, make use of or threaten to make use of any force, violence or restraint, or inflict or threaten to inflict, by himself or any other person, any temporal or spiritual injury, damage, harm or loss...
Seite 129 - ... intimidation upon or against any person in order to induce or compel such person to vote or refrain from voting...
Seite 9 - Like three distinct powers in mechanics, they jointly impel the machine of government in a direction different from what either acting by itself would have done ; but at the same time in a direction partaking of each and formed out of all ; a direction which constitutes the true line of the liberty and happiness of the community.
Seite 21 - In consequence of this change, it became a fundamental maxim and necessary principle (though in reality a mere fiction) of our English tenures, " that the king is the universal lord and original proprietor of all the lands in his kingdom...
Seite 178 - That he always thought any of the simple, unbalanced, governments bad; simple monarchy, simple aristocracy, simple democracy ; he held them all imperfect or vicious : all were bad by themselves : the composition alone was good. That these had been always his principles, in which he had agreed with his friend Mr. Burke, of whom he said many kind and flattering things, which Mr.
Seite 127 - WHEREAS the laws now in force for preventing corrupt practices in the election of members to serve in Parliament have been found insufficient : And whereas it is expedient to consolidate and amend such laws, and to make further provision for securing the freedom of such elections...
Seite 8 - And herein indeed consists the true excellence of the English government, that all the parts of it form a mutual check upon each other. In the legislature, the people are a check upon the nobility, and the nobility a check upon the people, by the mutual privilege of rejecting what the other has resolved ; while the king is a check upon both, which preserves the executive power from encroachments.
Seite 8 - In the legislature, the people are a check upon the nobility, and the nobility a check upon the people, by the mutual privilege of rejecting what the other has resolved ; while the king is a check upon both, which preserves the executive power from encroachments. And this very executive power is again checked and kept within due bounds by the two houses, through the privilege they have of inquiring into, impeaching, and punishing the conduct, not indeed of the king...

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