The History of the Life of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Band 1

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Seite 26 - That Man : — replied he, pointing to Marius at the bottom of the table. In the field he was cautious and provident, and, while he was watching the most...
Seite 211 - ... answers ; signifying by whom, and how often they had been introduced to him ; and then asked him, in their turn, whether he had never mentioned any thing to them about the Sibylline oracles; upon which, being confounded, or infatuated rather by the sense of his guilt, he gave a remarkable proof...
Seite 181 - ... the strength and sweetness of his voice, procured him some reputation as a speaker '. He was lazy, luxurious, and profligately wicked ; yet so vain and ambitious, as to expect, from the overthrow of the government, to be the first man in the Republic : in which fancy he was strongly flattered by some crafty soothsayers, who assured him, from the Sibylline books,
Seite 183 - Catiline was very desirous to see him taken off before he left Rome ; upon which two knights of the company undertook to kill him the next morning in his bed, in an early visit on pretence of business. But the meeting was no sooner over than Cicero had information of all that passed in it ; for by the intrigues of a woman, named Fulvia, he had gained over Curius, her lover, and one of the conspirators, to send him a punctual account of their deliberations.
Seite 48 - ... ftaid no where any longer than his benefit^ not his pleafure, detained him. By his previous knowledge of the laws of Rome, he was able to compare them with...
Seite 12 - Rostra, and where all the public pleadings and judicial proceedings were usually transacted : this therefore was the grand School of business and eloquence ; the scene, on which all the affairs of the Empire were determined, and where the foundation of their hopes and fortunes were to be laid : so that they were introduced into it with much solemnity, attended...
Seite 26 - Arpinum had the singular felicity to produce the most glorious contemner as well as the most illustrious improver of the ' arts and eloquence of Rome." He made no figure therefore in the gown, nor had any other way of sustaining his authority in the city, than by cherishing the natural jealousy between the Senate and the people ; that by his declared enmity to the one...
Seite 176 - Cicero, with some other chiefs of the senate, on the day of election ; but Cicero gave information of it to the senate the day before, upon which the election was deferred,- that they might have time to deliberate on an affair of so...
Seite 26 - Scipio, from the obfervation of his martial talents, while he had yet but an inferior command in the army, gave a kind of prophetic...
Seite 197 - ... of a few. This I promise, citizens, not from any confidence in my own prudence, or from any human counsels, but from the many evident declarations of the gods, by...

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