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From
Great

Britain.

Tons.

2,810

3,178

2,226

3,525

1,392

2,324 2,365

Other
Denominations.

Men.

239

221

149

178 221

351

213

9

9

10 and 1 Chapel

10 and 1 Chapel

10

10

10

Other
Denominations.

Imports.

From

British
Colonies.

Tons.

5,364

4,870

4,333

5,743

3,595

3,237

4,158

Government Office,

St. Lucia.

Women.

INWARDS.

From
British

From
Foreign

Colonies. Countries.

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2545599

69

39

55

21

36
23

60

No. of
Sittings.

5,932

5,982

6,575

5,550

6,892

7,090

6,441

From
Foreign
Countries.

Churches.

Tons.

1,851

3,109

3,190

3,205

2,579

3,418

2,768

Boys.

3322235

Average
Attendance.

Total No. of
Scholars.

904

1,117

1,393
1,243

1,052

1,072

1,147

Schools.

VALUE IN STERLING.

Total.

£ 8. d. £ s. d. £ s. d.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
22,179 3 7 29,612 4 9 17,089 17 7 68,881 5 11 45,699 6 6
38,508 16 8 25,800 10 8 16,691 15 3 81,002 2 7 46,553 9 8
26,001 2 8 27,350 5 9 19,298 17 11 72,650 6 4
41,966 8 9 27,879 2 11 26,432 19 4 96,278 11 O
12,831 0 9 22,188 14 7 20,494 9 255,514 4 6
838,323 12 11 30,264 19
1
5 91,901
8 39,202 19 6 29,310 19
5

£ s. d.
8,005 18 11
7,037 18 8
46,438 9 8 7,930 14 7
46,004 16 5 6,668 1
47,508 12 10 2,689 19
61,283 7 2 4,571 11 4 4,629 5
8 90,141 12 3 4,657 7 10 5,104 7

0

6

23,312 8

O

21,550 6

6 90,064

7,650

8,000

8,455

7,550

7,835

7,960

7,430

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Per Cent. in
Population.

31 63/00

33 7/00

Per Cent. on
Population.

33 81/00

31 28/00

31 50/00
3291 00

30 72 00

3.73/00

4.61/00

5.16/00

5.14/00

4.34/00

4.42,00

4.74/00

To

Great
Britain.

Return of Criminal and other Prisoners.

To
Great

Britain.

Tons.

3,548

3,930

3,799

3,434

3,883

3,452

2,975

Total.

316

265

206

201

259

377

278

Exports.

Centesimal Proportions calculated
according to Population Census
taken in 1850,

To

British
Colonies.

Remarks.

Remarks.

Tons.

4,287

4,830

4,125

2,468

5,308

3,527

4,707

Increase.

To
Foreign
Countries.

OUTWARDS.

53 118

To

Το
Foreign
Colonies. Countries.

British

s. d. £ s. d.
1,180 0 054,815 5 5
3,619 2 8 57,210 11 0
2,635 8 7 57,004 12 10
3,163 11
4,781 13

3 55,836 8 8

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Total.

4 54,980 5

6 70,484

2 99,903

Total.

Tons.

9,850

11,231

10,276

11,362

13,785

9,382

9,360

GEORGE M. M'LEOD,

547

Debtors

3

36

Chief Clerk.

803

ST. LUCIA.

ST. LUCIA.

Enclosure 2.

in No. 17.

Enclosure 3. in No. 17.

Enclosure 2 in No. 17.

ANNUAL REPORT of the INSPECTOR of PRISONS, ST. LUCIA, for 1857.
Special Justice's Office, Castries, 1st District,
January 15th 1858.

THE royal gaol of Castries is the only prison in St. Lucia; it is a substantial edifice in masonry, is commodious and well ventilated; it measures 75 in length and 36 feet in width, and has an open gallery along the whole front of nine feet in width. The prison is surrounded on three sides by high walls, and on the fourth by a wall four feet high surmounted by an iron railing. The Ordnance Department have, however, granted the colony a space of land of 86 feet by 18 feet adjoining this wall and railing, which were found quite insufficient for keeping the prisoners in, if they could escape the vigilance of the officer for a couple of minutes, and a wall to be 12 feet high is now being built; as soon as it is completed the old wall and railing are to be removed. There are four separate yards within the walls for exercise, &c. There are also within the walls an hospital, a house and kitchen for the gaoler, a store-room and a building containing two large airy cells, which were formerly used for the confinement of maniacs, but which since a lunatic asylum has been established in Castries have been made use of for the confinement of juvenile offenders; there is also a privy, through which water is continually running. In the front or main yard there is a large reservoir, into and out of which there is always flowing a copious supply of excellent water.

There

The prison is capable of containing 130 prisoners, with complete separation of the sexes. were 278 prisoners confined during the year, whilst in 1856 there were 377. This decrease is to be ascribed in a great measure to the diminution of imprisonment under the militia and road ordinances, although there appears to have been nearly double the number of convictions for felonies in 1857 to that of 1856; in 1856 the number being 34, and in 1857, 65.

There are nine wards on the upper floor of the gaol, 16 feet by 13 feet. Two of these are reserved for the confinement of debtors, one used as a day room, and one is occupied by the turnkey. The attic is divided into three large rooms, in which the female prisoners are kept. On the ground floor there are ten cells, which are clean, commodious, and well-ventilated.

Prisoners under sentence receive two suits of clothes per annum. No bedding whatever is supplied. The prisoners in the cells on the ground floor have raised trestles on which they sleep, those in the upper wards, generally parties for trial or who have been sentenced to imprisonment only, sleep on the floor.

The diet consists of half a pound of salt fish and half a pot of farine manioc, or its equivalent of bread or flour, per diem. Debtors receive an alimentary allowance from the incarcerating creditor; and soldiers imprisoned under sentence of courts-martial pay sixpence per diem for their rations.

The hours of labour of the penal gang are from 6 to 9 A. M. and from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.; the hours within the walls are from 6 to 10 A.M. and from 2 to 6 P.M. The work of the penal gang is not fixed, they being employed in all kinds of work, within a reasonable distance of the prison.

There is no regular chaplain appointed to the prison, but clergymen and religious teachers of all persuasions have free access to the prisoners during the hours appointed by the regulations. There is no chapel in the gaol nor any suitable apartment for the performance of divine service. The dayroom is used when any clergyman desires to teach the prisoners, who are separated in the best manner the size of the apartment will permit. Very nearly the whole of the prisoners during the year were Roman Catholics. The Protestant minister visited the prison 16 times during the year, the Roman Catholic priest but once.

The surgeon visits the gaol daily, and also attends whenever called by the keeper: he keeps a journal, in which is inserted the name of each sick prisoner, with the nature of the disease, the treatment or medicines prescribed, and the result of the case. 95 cases are reported as having been taken into hospital during the year: there was no death. The most prevalent diseases were fever, ulcers, diarrhoea, and ophthalmia.

I have, &c. (Signed)

J. H. JENNINGS,

Sp. J., 1 D., and Insp. of Prisons.

Enclosure 3. in No. 17.

RULES and REGULATIONS for the Conduct of the ROYAL GAOL of ST. LUCIA, as revised and amended by his Excellency Lieutenant-Governor Power in Council, on the 10th of October 1854.

INSPECTOR OF PRISONS.

1. The inspector of prisons nominated under the Imperial Act of 1 & 2 Vict. cap. 67. shall visit the prison at least once in every week at uncertain periods.

2. He is empowered to call before him the keeper and all subordinate officers of the prison, and to require them to produce prisoners and books, papers and documents, whenever he shall think fit.

3. It shall be the duty of the inspector to inquire into every matter connected with the gaol; and whenever he may consider it necessary, to make a special report thereon to the LieutenantGovernor.

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THE KEEPER.

4. The keeper shall reside within the gaol. He shall not be allowed to sell any articles to prisoners, or have any interest in any contract for supplying provisions, or otherwise.

5. The keeper is on no account himself to employ or allow the matron or other officer to employ prisoners for any purpose, except such menial service as may be permitted by the provost marshal general.

6. He shall exercise his authority with firmness, temper, and humanity, abstain from all irritating language, and never strike a prisoner. He shall enforce similar conduct on the part of the subordinate officers of the prison.

7. He shall enforce a high degree of cleanliness in the prison, as well with respect to the buildings and yards as to the persons and clothing of the prisoners.

8. It shall be the duty of the keeper to take care that the apartments of the gaol be washed every Wednesday and Saturday morning, except in wet weather, and that the prison be swept and cleaned twice in each day, and also that the walls of the passages and wards of the prison are whitewashed once every two months.

9. On the death of a prisoner, the keeper shall immediately give notice to the coroner of the district, and, if practicable, to the relations of the deceased.

10. The keeper of the prison shall keep two books, one a diary and the other a register, according to forms approved by the provost marshal and sanctioned by the Lieutenant-Governor, in which books shall be entered the name of each prisoner, the date of commitment, the personal description, trade, or calling, the time for which committed, by whose order, the nature of offence, the sentence passed, the punishment inflicted, and the day of release, with remarks.

11. The keeper shall not receive any person as a prisoner into the royal gaol without a formal sentence or commitment in writing, in which the cause of committal or sentence shall be expressly stated, except persons brought in by the police for safe custody, until they can be taken before a magistrate, and persons so brought in for safe custody shall not be detained longer than is necessary for that purpose, such period of detention in no case to exceed 24 hours.

12. The keeper, on receiving any person as a prisoner under a committal (whether for trial, under sentence, or otherwise), shall take particular care that such prisoner is disposed of according to the classification established by the 19th rule.

13. The keeper shall make a round of the prison every night at eight o'clock, and shall carefully inspect the several prisoners.

14. Besides the specific duties enumerated, the keeper will consider himself generally responsible for the due execution of all regulations respecting the safe keeping, classification, discipline, and treatment of prisoners.

THE SURGEON.

15. The surgeon attached to the gaol shall visit the prisons daily, and also attend whenever called upon by the keeper.

16. The surgeon shall keep a journal or record in which shall be inserted the name of each sick prisoner, with the nature of the prisoner's disease, and the treatment or medicines prescribed, and the result of the case, and remarks.

17. The surgeon will deliver to the provost marshal general and to the inspector of prisons, at the close of every year, a report in writing, upon the general state of health of the prisoners during the past year, and specifying the disorders which have been most prevalent, and stating whether any connexion may in his opinion be traced between the diseases which have occurred and the locality or state of the building, diet or employment of the prisoners, or any other facts which have come under his notice; also the number of deaths, and the proportion of sick to the average number of prisoners during the year.

CLASSIFICATION, TREATMENT, AND DISCIPLINE OF PRISONERS.

Classification.

18. Female prisoners shall be kept apart from the male prisoners, so as to prevent them from seeing, conversing, or holding any intercourse with each other; and female prisoners shall at all times be attended by female officers, and separated among themselves as much as possible, in conformity with the rules established for male prisoners.

19. Male prisoners in gaol shall be classified as follows:

First. Prisoners for debt.

Second. Persons committed for contempt of court in civil process, or for want of securities,

or to be examined as witnesses in behalf of the Crown in any prosecution.

Third. Persons committed for trial on suspicion of misdemeanours, and for petty offences,
and as vagrants.

Fourth. Persons committed on charge of theft, or felony of any description.

Fifth. Prisoners convicted of misdemeanours.

Sixth. Prisoners convicted of theft, or of felony of any description.

20. All persons, on admission as prisoners, shall be strictly searched, and knives or other sharp or dangerous weapons be taken from them, and their clothing and bedding shall be likewise examined. Such personal examination, as regards female prisoners, to be made by or under the superintendence of the matron, and to be executed by females, and in the presence of the matron alone.

21. Prisoners convicted of felony shall be restricted to the back yard of the prison during the hours of exercise.

ST. LUCIA.

ST. LUCIA.

22. That the hours of airing or exercise of prisoners confined as debtors be limited and arranged so as they may not be at large at the same time with the other prisoners.

Treatment.

23. Provisions of good, sound, and wholesome quality, will be issued by the keeper to each prisoner daily, and without distinction, according to the tariff hereunto annexed.

24. Under no pretence whatever shall any money or spirits or other article be issued to any prisoner in lieu of provisions, unless by an express order in writing of the surgeon.

25. No wine, spirits, or strong waters shall be permitted to be introduced into the gaol under any pretence whatsoever, except under an order in writing by the surgeon.

26. No extra food shall be allowed to any prisoner without a written order to that effect of the surgeon or the provost marshal general.

27. All prisoners sick or unable to work shall be removed to the hospital.

28. If a prisoner complains of illness, the case shall be reported without delay to the surgeon, and no prisoner so complaining is to be compelled to labour until after the surgeon has seen and given directions respecting such prisoner.

29. Every convicted prisoner shall receive clothing of two shirts, two pairs trowsers, and a woollen eap, per annum, or proportionably to the term of his imprisonment. Female prisoners to receive an cquivalent in quality and quantity.

30. All inmates of the gaol shall be locked up by seven o'clock in the evening.

31. No light shall be permitted to the prisoners in gaol after eight o'clock in the evening.
32. The hours allotted for exercise shall be regulated as follows:-

For male prisoners-from 10 to 12 A.M.
For female prisoners-from 12 to 2 P.M.

Discipline.

33. Prisoners in the gaol shall not be allowed to smoke or to make use of tobacco in any way.
34. Gambling of any description whatever will not be permitted within the gaol.
35. Writing on or defacing the doors or walls of the prison is strictly prohibited.

36. Sentence to hard labour shall be carried into effect by work in the penal gang, or in breaking stones within the precincts of the gaol, or in other task-works suited to the craft or trade of any prisoner. Washing and cleaning the prison and gaol-yard to be performed by convicted prisoners; and silence is to be enjoined and enforced at every description of work.

37. The hours of labour for the penal gang shall be from 6 to 9 A.M., and from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. 38. The hours of labour within the prison yard shall be from 6 to 10 A.M., and from 2 to 6 P.M. 39. Convicts in the penal gang, whose refractory conduct renders the restraint of fetters necessary for their safe keeping while employed on public works without the prison walls, shall be secured by chains similar to those used for such convicts in England.

40. All contumacious or disorderly conduct of prisoners (whether by refusing or neglecting to perform their work, or by wilful damage to or mismanagement of it,) and all offences, such as disobedience of the prison rules, assaults by prisoners on each other or on any officer of the establishment, abusive and profane language, indecent or irreverent behaviour during divine service or religious teaching, may be inquired into by a visiting justice to be from time to time appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor, who may in any such case order the offender to be punished with solitary confinement, for any time not exceeding six days; and in any flagrant case of violent or refractory conduct, the prisoner so offending may be ordered by him to be whipped, such punishment not to exceed thirty-six lashes for each offence.

41. No punishment whatever shall be carried into effect without the express sanction of the Lieutenant-Governor.

42. The punishment of whipping, when inflicted, shall be carried into effect within the gaol, in presence of the provost marshal general, the medical officer, and the keeper of the gaol.

43. In all cases of whipping, a medical examination and certificate of the capability of the prisoner to endure the punishment shall precede its infliction.

44. Punishments by whipping shall take place before the hour of six in the morning, unless otherwise ordered, or the special nature of the case require a departure from this rule.

VISITS TO AND COMMUNICATIONS FOR AND FROM PRISONERS.

Visits.

45. Prisoners not convicted of, or charged with, any criminal offence, may be allowed to receive visitors between the hours of 7 and 10 A.M. and 2 and 6 P.M., unless the provost marshal general or inspectors of prisons shall have issued an order to the contrary, in which case the name of the applicant, together with the name of the prisoner and date of refusal, must be entered on the journal of the gaol.

46. Prisoners, while under commitment for examination or re-examination, shall not be allowed the access of legal adviser or friends, except by authority of the committing magistrate, and under such restrictions as to him shall seem requisite.

47. Visitors, except clergy or counsel, shall not be admitted or allowed to remain within the prison during the hours set apart for the exercise and recreation of the prisoners.

48. Visitors, previous to admission, shall give their, names and the name of the prisoner or prisoners whom they wish to visit.

49. The names of all visitors, and of the prisoners whom they visit, shall be inserted in a book to ST. LUCIA be kept for that purpose.

50. Prisoners under conviction shall not be allowed to receive the visits of their friends or relations until after the expiration of the first three months of their imprisonment; but subsequently to that period, they may see their friends or relations once in the course of each successive three months.

51. In cases of sickness, or other special circumstances, however, convicted prisoners and prisoners committed for nonpayment of penalties or for want of sureties, may receive the visits of their relations and friends at other times, subject to the general regulations of the prison, and provided that such special circumstances be entered in the journal kept by the g oler for recording the names of visitors and the name of the prisoner to whom such visit is made.

Communications.

52. Parcels or letters shall not be delivered to or sent by any prisoner under crimiral [sentence, until they have been inspected by the keeper; and in case any improper communication be attempted to be made to or by any prisoner, the keeper shall withhold such parcel or letter until he has the direction of the provost marshal general, who may dispose of the same as he may think fit.

53. Books or newspapers shall not be admitted into the gaol, except such as shall be deemed proper for the religious and moral instruction of the prisoners, to be approved of by the provost marshal general, except in the case of debtors, who shall be allowed to receive books, papers, and letters.

MISCELLANEOUS.

54. No insane person, as such, to be admitted into the prison.

Tariff of Provisions for Prisoners in Gaol.

Each male and female adult prisoner shall receive daily rations of lb. salt fish (cod fish,) † pot farine manioc or 14 lbs. of bread.

Allowance for Debtors.

1st Class.-Debtors incarcerated in virtue of a decree issuing from the royal court one shilling sterling per diem.

2d Class.- Petty debt court, 74d. per diem.

3d Class.-Justice of the peace court the ordinary gaol rations in kind, the incarcerating creditor being required to deposit in the hands of the gaoler, the value of the rations at the rate at which they are furnished.

Two sofas.

Four card tables.

Two sofa tables.

Done and passed in Council, this 10th day of October 1854.
R. G. M'HUGH,

Enclosure 4. in No. 17.

REPORT of the PAVILION COMMITTEE, ST. LUCIA, for the Year 1857.

The pavilion has remained unoccupied during the year 1857. A married soldier from the 41st regiment had been told off by direction of his Excellency Sir A. J. Clöete, commanding Her Majesty's forces, for the purpose of taking care of the premises, and has occupied a portion of the outbuildings.

The pavilion being constructed wholly of wood requires constant repair; and the committee beg respectfully to submit for consideration whether measures should not be taken either towards making the building serviceable or disposing of it.

(Signed)

Seventeen drawing-room chairs.
One bronze three-light chandelier.

Enclosure 5. in No. 17.

INVENTORY of the FURNITURE, the PROPERTY of the COLONY, in the PAVILION.

Drawing Room.

Office and Gallery.

Dining Room.

One large side-board.

Two small ditto.

One telescope table and leaves.
One side table.

Twenty-three dining-room chairs.
One celaret.

Acting Colonial Secretary.

R. G. M'HUGH, H. M. Treasurer.
JAMES MACFARLANE, M.C.

One ottoman.

Two small tables.

Two easy chairs.
One writing table.
Two office tables.
Eleven chairs.
One small press.

One large armoire.

First Bed Room.

One bedstead and mattress and netting.

One chest of drawers.

One armoire.

Enclosure 4. in No. 17.

Enclosure

in No. 17.

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