Nch'i-wána, "the Big River": Mid-Columbia Indians and Their Land

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University of Washington Press, 1991 - 378 Seiten
1 Rezension

The mighty Columbia River cuts a deep gash through the Miocene basalts of the Columbia Plateau, coursing as well through the lives of the Indians who live along its banks. Known to these people as Nch’i-Wana (the Big River), it forms the spine of their land, the core of their habitat.

At the turn of the century, the Sahaptin speakers of the mid-Columbia lived in an area between Celilo Falls and Priest Rapids in eastern Oregon and Washington. They were hunters and gatherers who survived by virtue of a detailed, encyclopedic knowledge of their environment. Eugene Hunn’s authoritative study focuses on Sahaptin ethnobiology and the role of the natural environment in the lives and beliefs of their descendants who live on or near the Yakima, Umatilla, and Warm Springs reservations.

 

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Inhalt

Introduction
3
History
19
Language
58
Ecology
89
Animal and Plant Resources
138
Society
202
Religion
228
From the Treaties to Today
269
Bibliography
295
Sahaptin Animal Terms
311
Sahaptin Plant Terms
333
Some Plateau Medicinal Plants
351
Columbia River Sahaptin Kinterms
359
The Yakima Treaty June 9 1855
363
Index
367
Urheberrecht

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Verweise auf dieses Buch

Sacred Ecology
Fikret Berkes
Keine Leseprobe verfügbar - 2008
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Über den Autor (1991)

Katrine Barber is assistant professor of history at Portland State University and an associate at the Center for Columbia River History.

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