Ten Englishmen of the Nineteenth Century: Wellington, Canning, Stephenson, Russell, Cobden, Peel, Shaftesbury, Palmerston, Gladstone, Disraeli

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Chautauqua Press, 1902 - 260 Seiten
 

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Seite 198 - I am as free as nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran.
Seite 129 - Do ye hear the children weeping, O my brothers, Ere the sorrow comes with years? They are leaning their young heads against their mothers, And that cannot stop their tears. The young lambs are bleating in the meadows: The young birds are chirping in the nest; The young fawns are playing with the shadows; The young flowers are blowing toward the west — But the young, young children, O my brothers, They are weeping bitterly ! 10 They are weeping in the playtime of the others, In the country of the...
Seite 227 - For all day the wheels are droning, turning; Their wind comes in our faces, Till our hearts turn, our heads with pulses burning, And the walls turn in their places: Turns the sky in the high window blank and reeling, Turns the long light that drops...
Seite 226 - we are weary, And we cannot run or leap; If we cared for any meadows, it were merely To drop down in them and sleep. Our knees tremble sorely in the stooping, We fall upon our faces, trying to go; And, underneath our heavy eyelids drooping, The reddest flower would look as pale as snow. For, all day, we drag our burden tiring, Through the coal-dark, underground; Or, all day, we drive the wheels of iron 10 In the factories, round and round.
Seite 225 - Why their tears are falling so ? The old man may weep for his to-morrow Which is lost in Long Ago. The old tree is leafless in the forest, The old year is ending in the frost, The old wound, if stricken, is the sorest, The old hope is hardest to be lost.
Seite 190 - With banner and with music, with soldier and with priest, With a nation weeping, and breaking on my rest?" — Mighty Seaman, this is he Was great by land as thou by sea. Thine island loves thee well, thou famous man, The greatest sailor since our world began. Now, to the roll of muffled drums, To thee the greatest soldier comes; For this is he Was great by land as thou by sea.
Seite 196 - Who in their coaches roll along the turnpikeRoad, what hard work 'tis crying all day ' Knives and Scissors to grind O!' "Tell me, Knife-grinder, how you came to grind knives? Did some rich man tyrannically use you ? Was it the squire ? or parson of the parish ? Or the attorney? "Was it the squire, for killing of his game ? or Covetous parson, for his tithes distraining ? Or roguish lawyer, made you lose your little All in a law-suit? "(Have you not read the Rights of Man, by Tom Paine?) Drops of...
Seite 226 - We looked into the pit prepared to take her: Was no room for any work in the close clay; From the sleep wherein she lieth, none will wake her, Crying, 'Get up, little Alice! it is day.' If you listen by that grave, in sun and shower, With your ear down, little Alice never cries. Could we see her face, be sure we should not know her, For the smile has time for growing in her eyes; And merry go her moments, lulled and stilled in The shroud by the kirk-chime. It is good when it happens," say the children,...
Seite 59 - I called the New World into existence to redress the balance of the Old.
Seite 194 - Uplifted high in heart and hope are we, Until we doubt not that for one so true There must be other nobler work to do Than when he fought at Waterloo; And Victor he must ever be, For tho' the Giant Ages heave the hill And break the shore, and evermore Make and break and work their will; Tho...

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