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PERMANENT COURT OF ARBITRATION

OF THE

HAGUE-Continued.

Greece-Mr. Denis Stephanos, Deputy, formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs.
Mr. Georges Strelt, Professor of International Law at the University of Athens.
Mr. Michel Kebedgy, formerly Judge of the Mixed Court of Appeals at Alexandria.
M. A. Typaldo Bassia, Member of the Chamber of Deputies.

Guatemala-Mr. Antonio Batres Jauregui, Councillor of State, formerly President of the Judicial Power and of the Supreme Court of Justice, formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs and Public Instruction, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Rio de Janeiro and at Washington.

Mr. Carlos Salazar, Substitute Dean of the Faculty of Law, Guatemalan Counsel at the Court of Justice of Central America, formerly Member of the Court of Appeals.

Mr. Antonio González Saravia, Judge of the Supreme Court.

Mr. Alberto Mencos, formerly Minister of Special Mission.

Hayti-Mr. Jaques Nicolas Leger, Barrister, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Washington. Mr. Solon Menos, Barrister, formerly Secretary of State for Finance, Commerce, Justice and Foreign Relations. Mr. F. D. Legitime, Publiciste, formerly President of Hayti.

Mr. Tertulllen Gullbaud, Barrister, formerly Member of the Constitutional Assembly, formerly Senator.

Italy-His Excellency Commander Jean Baptiste Pagano Guarnaschelli, LL. D., Senator of the Kingdom, First President of the Court of Cassation at Rome.

Mr. Guldo Fusinato, Deputy Councillor of State, Professor of International Law.

Mr. Victor Emmanuel Orlando, Lawyer, University Professor, Member of Parliament, formerly Minister of Justice. His Excellency Tommasco Tittoni, Senator, Ambassador at Paris.

Japan-Baron Itchiro Motono, LL. D., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at St. Petersburg. Mr. Henry Willard Denison, Law Officer of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs at Tokio. Luxemburg-Mr. Henri Vannerus, President of the Council of State, formerly President of the Superior Court of Justice.

Mexico-Mr. José Ives Limantour, LL. D., formerly Minister of Finance and Public Credit.
Mr. Pablo Macedo, LL. D.. formerly President of the Monetary Commission.

Mr. Joaquin Obregon Gonzalez, LL. D., Governor of Guanajuato.

Mr. Joaquin D. Casasus, LL. D., formerly Ambassador at Washington.

Montenegro-(No appointments have been made).

Netherlands-Mr. F. B. Coninck Liefsting, LL. D., formerly President of the Court of

Cassation.

His Excellency Mr. Jonkheer A. F. de Savornin Lohman, LL.D., formerly Minister of the Interior. Mr. Jonkheer G. L. M. H. Ruys de Beerenbrouck, LL.D., formerly Minister of Justice. Mr. P. W. A. Cort van der Linden, LL. D., Member of the Council of State, formerly Minister of Justice.

Nicaragua-Mr. Desire Pector, Consul-General at Paris.

Norway-Mr. G. Gram, Provincial Governor, formerly Minister of State of Norway.

His Excellency Mr. George Francis Hagerup, LL. D., formerly Minister of State and President of the Council.

Mr. Sigurd Ibsen, LL. D., formerly Minister of State.

Mr. H. J. Horst, formerly President of the Lagthing.

Panama-His Excellency Dr. Bellsario Porras, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Washington, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at San José, Costa Rica.

Mr. Ramon M. Valdes, LL. D., formerly Minister at Washington, London and Brussels. Persia-His Excellency Mirza Samad-Khan Momtazos-Saltaneh, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Paris. His Excellency Mirza Hassan-Khan Muchir ul Devlet, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at St. Petersburg.

Peru-His Excellency Mr. Carlos G. Candamo, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Paris and London.

Dr. Ramon Ribeyro, Member of the Supreme Court of Justice, formerly Minister of State. Dr. Luis F. Villaran, Rector of the University of San Marcos, Member of the Supreme Court of Justice, formerly Minister of State.

His Excellency Dr. Manuel Alvarez Calderon, Minister at Berne, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Brussels.

Portugal-His Excellency Fernando Matozo Santos, formerly Peer of the Realm, and Minister of Finances and Foreign Affairs. His Excellency Mr. Francisco Antonio da Veiga Beirao, Councillor of State, formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs and of Justice.

His Excellency Mr. José Capello Franco Frazao, formerly President of the Chamber of Deputies. His Excellency Mr. Artur Pinto de Miranda Montenegro, LL. D., formerly Minister of Justice. Roumania-Mr. Theodore G. Rosetti, formerly President of the Council of Ministers, formerly President of the High Court of Cassation and Justice.

Mr. Jean Kalinderu, LL. D., formerly President of the High Court of Cassation and Justice. Mr. Jean N. Lahovary, Minister of Agriculture, of Industry, of Commerce and of Domain, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs. Mr. Constantin G. Dissescu, formerly Minister of Worship and Public Instruction. Russia-Mr. A. Sabouroff, Secretary of State, Member and President of the First Department of the Council of the Empire, Senator, Privy Councilor.

Mr. Tagantzeff, Member of the Council of the Empire, Senator, Privy Councillor. Baron Taube, Permanent Member of the Council of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Professor of International Law at the Imperial University of St. Petersburg, Councillor of State. Salvador-Mr. Manu Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentlary, formerly Rector of the National University. Delgado, LL. D., formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs, formerly Mr. Salvador Gallegos, LL. D., formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs, formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.

PERMANENT COURT OF ARBITRATION OF THE

HAGUE-Continued.

Mr. Salvador Rodriguez Gonzalez, LL. D., formerly Minister for Foreign Affairs, of Justice and Public Charities.

Mr. Alonso Reyes Guerra, LL. D., Consul-General at Hamburg, Germany.

Servia-Mr. George Pavlovitch, formerly Minister of Justice,, President of the Court of Cassation, Professor of Law of the University of Belgrade. Dr. Milenko R. Vesnitch, LL. D., formerly Minister of Justice, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Piel potentiary at Paris.

Slam-Mr. Corragioni d'Orelli, LL. D., Counsellor of Legation at Paris.

Mr. Jens I. Westengard, General Adviser to the Slamese Government.
Spain-His Excellency E. Dato, eputy, formerly Minister of Justice.

His Excellency R. M. de Labra, Senator, Barrister at the Court of Cassation.

His Excellency Mr. Manuel Garcia Prieto, LL. D., formerly Minister of State and Minister of Justice.

Mr. Fellpe Sanchez Roman, Senator, formerly Sub-Secretary of Grace and Justice. Sweden-Mr. Knut Hjalmar Leonard de Hammarskjold, LL. D., formerly Minister of Justice, and Minister Plenipotentiary at Copenhagen.

Mr. Johan Frederik Ivar Afzelius, LL. D., Member of the First Chamber of the Diet. Mr. Johannes Hellner, LL. D., formerly Minister, Member of the Supreme Court. Baron Carl Nils Daniel Bildt, D. Litt., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Italy. Switzerland-His Excellency Mr. Charles Lardy. LL. D., Swiss Minister at Paris. Mr. Eugene Huber, LL. D., Professor at the University of Berne.

Col. Leo Weber, LL. D., formerly Federal Judge, Colonel of the Military Justice, Auditor-inChief of the Swiss Army.

Turkey-His Highness Ibrahim H. Pasha, formerly Ambassador at Rome.

His Excellency Yorghiadis Effendi, Senator.

His Excellency Said Bey, formerly Vice-President of the Council of State.

His Excellency Gabriel Effendi Nouradounghian, Senator.

United States-Mr. George Gray, United States Circuit Judge, formerly United States Senator.

Mr. Oscar S. Straus, formerly Secretary of Commerce and Labor, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary at Constantinople.

Mr. Elihu Root, United States Senator, formerly Secretary of War.

Mr. John Bassett Moore, Counsellor of the Department of State.

Uruguay-Mr. Juan Pedro Castro, LL. D., formerly Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Paris and Brussels.

Mr. Juan Zorilla de San Martin, LL. D., formerly Minister Plenipotentiary at Madrid, Lisbon and Paris.

Mr. José Pedro Massera, LL. D., Member of the Chamber of Deputies.

Venezuela-Dr. Carlos Leon, LL. D., formerly Minister of Public Instruction, formerly Member of the Court of Cassation.

Dr. Nicomedes Zuloaga, LL. D., formerly Member of the Court of Cassation.

Dr. Francisco Arroyo Parejo, LL. D., formerly Procuror-General.

Gen. Manuel Antonio Matos, formerly Senator, formerly Minister of Finance.
Secretary-General-Baron Michiels van Verduynen.

First Secretary of the Court-Jonkheer W. Roell.

The Administrative Council-The Administrative Council consists of the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands and the diplomatic representatives at The Hague of the ratifying powers.

DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE PERMANENT COURT OF ARBITRATION AT THE HAGUE.

October 14, 1902-in the matter of the case of the Plus Fund of the Californias between the United States and Mexico.

February 22, 1904-Respecting the preferential claims of the creditor nations of Venezuela under the protocols of May 7, 1963.

May 22, 1905-In the difference between France, Germany and Great Britain on the one hand, and Japan on the other, respecting leases held in perpetuity.

May 22, 1909-In the matter of the Casablanca dispute between France and Germany. August 8, 1909-In the matter of the dispute between Great Britain and France, respecting the right of certain Muscat Dhows to fly the French flag.

October 23, 1909-Respecting the maritime boundary between Norway and Sweden.
Sept. 7, 1910-In the North Atlantic Fisheries case between the United States and Great Britain.
October 25, 1910-In the Orinoco steamship case between the United States and Venezuela.
February 24, 1911-In the "Savarkar" case between Great Britain and France.
Nov. 11, 1912-In the "Interest" case between Russia and Turkey.
May 3, 1912-In the "Canevaro" case between Italy and Peru.
May 6, 1913-In the "Carthage" case between France and Italy.
May 6, 1913-In the "Manouba" case between France and Italy

INTERNATIONAL TRIBUNALS OF EGYPT.

In 1876, as the result of negotiations between the Ottoman and Egyptian Governments and the various Christian powers having representatives at Cairo, certain courts were created in Egypt for tae trial of civil and commercial causes arising between natives and foreigners of different nationality, as well as all questions of real estate between any person and suits of foreigners against the Egyptian Government and members of the Khedival family. These mixed tribunals, in civil matters within their exclusive jurisdiction, superseded the consular courts. A mixed tribunal consists of five judges. three of whom are foreigners and two natives. The foreign judges are appointed by the Khedive on the recommendation of the great powers, each of which is represented by from one to three judges. There are three tribunals of original jurisdiction (first instance), one each at Calro, Alexandria and Mansura, and a Court of Appeals at Alexandria. The United States Is represented in these courts by the following judges:

Court of Appeals.-Somerville P. Tuck, of New York (appointed 1908; appointed to Court of First Instance 1894). Court of First Instance.-William G. Van Horne, of Utah (appointed 1902); Plerre Crabités, of Louisiana (appointed 1911).

4

The Panama Canal.

The Panama Canal.

[graphic]

THE present composition of the Isthmian Canal Commission is as follows:

Chairman and Chief Engineer, Col. George W. Goethals; Assistant Chief Engineer, Col. H. F. Hodges; assistant to the Chief Engineer, Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, U. S. N.; Division Engineer, Central Division, Lieut.-Col. D. D. Galllard; Division Engineer, Atlantic Division, Lieut.Col. Willian L. Sibert; Chief Sanitary Officer, Col. W. C. Gorgas; Head of the Department of Civil Administration, Richard L. Metcalfe. The members of the Commission receive salaries of $14,000 per annum, except the Chairman, who receives $15,000. Major F. C. Boggs, Chief of Office, WashIngton, D. C.

The Canal has a summit elevation of 85 feet above the sea. It is about 50 miles in length from deep water in the Caribbean Sea to deep water in the Pacific Ocean. The distance from deep water to the shore line in Li non Bay is about 4 miles, and from the Pacific shore line to deep water is about 4 miles; hence the length of the Canal from shore to shore is approximately 41% miles. The channel ranges in width fron 300 to 1,000 feet. project is 649 feet, and the mini num width is 300 feet. The Canal has a minimum depth of 41 feet. It is estimated that the time required for the passage of a ship of medium size through the entire The average bottom width of the channel in this length of the Canal will be from 9% to 10 hours, and for larger vessels from 10% to 11 hours.

The Gatun dam along the crest is 8,000 feet long, including the spillway, or about 1 miles, and 2,100 feet wide at its greatest width. The crest of the dam is at an elevation of 115 feet above sea level, or 30 feet above the normal level of Gatun Lake, and 100 feet wide. The width of the dam at the normal water level of the lake, t. e., 85 feet above sea level, is about 388 feet.

The cost esti nated by the present commission for completing the Canal is $325,201,000, which Includes $20,053,000 for sanitation and $7,382,000 for civil administration.

These figures do not include the $50,000,000 paid to the New French Canal Company and to the Republic of Panama for property and franchises. Hence, it is estimated that the total cost of

the Canal to the United States will approximate $375,000,000.

The date set for the official opening of the Panama Canal is January 1, 1915, although the Canal Is expected to be open to light craft in 1914. Shipping interests will be advised as soon as the commission feels assured that vessels can be passed without unnecessary delay.

Appropriations and expenditures to December 31, 1912:

Receipts and Expenditures-Appropriations by Congress, $322,541,468; fortifications, March 4, 1911, $3,000,000; August 24, 1912, $2,806,950; private acts for relief of individuals, $9,980. Total credited by United States Treasury to December 31, 1912, $328,358,398; miscellaneous, $7,888,317; total receipts, $336,246,715. ance available December 31, 1912, $42,056,939; total, $336,246,715. Disbursements-Including classified expenditures, $294,189,776; bal

Distances from New York to San Francisco by water, present route, 13,400 miles; via Panama Canal, 5,300 miles. miles. New York to Manila via Hawall, now 17,800 miles; by Canal, 12,000 miles. New York to Hawall, present all-water route, 12,800 miles: by Canal, 7,000

From New York to all American Pacific ports north of Panama there will be a uniform reduction of 8,415 miles and to such ports south of Panama a uniform reduction of about 5,000 miles. The corresponding reductions from Liverpool and Antrp will be about 6,000 and 2,600, respectively. From Hamburg to San Francisco the reduction will be 6,200 miles.

Between New York and Yokohama the reduction will be 3,729 miles, and that Japanese city will be brought nearer to New York than Liverpool by 1,805 miles. Shanghai will be 1,629 miles nearer to New York. Sydney, Australla, will be 3,806 miles nearer to New York, and the distance between the two cities will be 2,382 miles less than the distance between Sydney and Liverpool. Wellington, New Zealand, will be 2,542 miles nearer New York, and the distance between them will be 2,759 miles less than between Wellington and Liverpool. an average saving of 1,600 miles. way to China and Japan and thence to Vancouver, Seattle, and San Francisco, will return to their British ships which now pass through the Suez Canal on their Between New Zealand and Europe there will be home ports by way of the Panama Canal when return cargoes can be obtained in those cities. Ships from Japan, China, Australia, New Zealand and from Pacific ports of South America will sail to New York via the new waterway.-(From United States Consul Report.)

A PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

PANAMA CANAL TOLL RATES.

I, William Howard Taft, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me by the act of Congress, approved August 24, 1912, to provide for the opening, maintenance, protection and operation of the Panama Canal and the sanitation and government of the Canal zone, do hereby prescribe and proclaim the following rates of toll to be paid by vessels using the Panama Canal:

1. On merchant vessels carrying passengers or cargo one dollar and twenty cents ($1.20) per net vessel ton-each one hundred (100) cubic feet-of actual earning capacity. 2. On vessels in ballast without passengers or cargo forty (40) per cent. less than the rate of tolls for vessels with passengers or cargo.

3. Upon naval vessels, other than transports, colliers, hospital ships and supply ships, fifty (50) cents per displacement ton.

4. Upon Army and Navy transports, colllers, hospital ships and supply ships one dollar and twenty cents ($1.20) per net ton, the vessels to be measured by the same rules as are employed in determining the net tonnage of merchant vessels.

The Secretary of War will prepare and prescribe such rules for the measurement of vessels and such regulations as may be necessary and proper to carry this proclamation into full force and effect. Washington, D. C., November 14, 1912.

FORTIFICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

Chapter 285 of the Statutes of the Sixty-first Congress, third session, "An act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1912, and for other purposes," approved March 4, 1911, contained the following appropriations for the fortification of the Isthmian Canal:

"For construction of sea-coast batteries on the Canal zone, two million dollars;

"For the purchase, manufacture and test of sea-coast cannon for coast defence, including their carriages, sights, Implements, equipments and machinery necessary for the manufacture at the arsenals (to cost ultimately not to exceed one million, nine hundred and sixty-six thousand dollars). one million dollars, the same to be immediately available and to continue available until expended." Public Law No. 302-An act making appropriations for Sundry Civil Expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1913, and for other purposes, approved August 24, 1912, contained the following appropriations for the fortification of the Isthmian Canal,

For the following for fortifications and armament thereof for the Isthmian Canal, to be immediately available and to continue available until expended, namely:

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

Surveys-For detalled surveys of the areas on the Canal zone required for military purposes, including the cost of marking permanently the boundaries of such areas, $50,000;

Causeway-For the construction of a causeway or bridge for use in connection with fortifications, Isthmian Canal, $150,000;

Seacoast Batteries-For construction of seacoast batteries on the Canal zone, $1,000,000, and any balances of the appropriation for the construction of seacoast batteries on the Canal zone made by the act of March 4, 1911.

Submarine Mine Structures-For the construction of mining casemates, cable galleries, torpedo storehouses, cable tanks and other structures necessary for the operation, preservation and care of submarine mines and their accessories on the Canal zone, $220,200;

Field Fortifications and Camps-For the construction of field fortifications and the preparation of camp sites on the Canal zone, $200,000;

Armament of Fortifications-For the purchase, manufacture and test of seacoast cannon for coast defence, including their carriages, sights, implements, equipments and the machinery necessary for the manufacture at the arsenals (to cost ultimately not to exceed $2,324,000), $500,000;

For the purchase, manufacture and test of ammunition for seacoast cannon, including the necessary experiments in connection therewith, and the machinery necessary for its manufacture at the arsenals, $575,000;

Submarine Mines For the purchase of submarine mines and the necessary appliances to operate them for closing the channels leading to the Isthmian Canal, $111,750.

In all, specifically for fortifications and armament thereof for the Isthmian Canal, $2,806,950. An act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1914, and for other purposes.-(Approved June 23, 1913.)

For the following for fortifications and armament thereof for the Panama Canal, to be Immediately available and to continue avallable until expended, namely:

Surveys-For detailed surveys of the areas on the Canal zone required for military purposes, Including the cost of marking permanently the boundaries of such areas, $12,000;

Purchase of Land-For the purchase of land on the Canal zone required for military purposes,

$50,000:

Seacoast Batteries-For the construction of seacoast batteries on the Canal zone, $2,365,000; Electric Light and Power Plants-For the purchase and installation of electric light and power plants for the seacoast fortifications on the Canal zone, $173,000; Searchlights--For the purchase and installation of searchlights for the seacoast fortifications on the Canal zone, $285,000:

Sanitary Clearing-For sanitary clearing, filling and drainage in vicinity of camps, posts, and defensive works on the Canal zone, as follows:

Margarita Island-For filling swamp in rear defensive works, $180,000; for clearing and ImprovIng permanent post site and drill ground at Miraflores, $30,000;

Armament of Fortifications-For the purchase, manufacture, and test of seacoast cannon for coast defence, Including their carriages, sights, implements, equipments, and the machinery necessary for their manufacture at the arsenals (to cost ultimately not to exceed $2,506,000). $1,000,000: Provided, That the Chief of Ordnance is authorized to transfer to and use in the fortifications of the Panama Canal one sixteen-inch gun and carriage, procured, or to be procured, out of appropriations heretofore made under armament of fortifications for Continental United States;

For the purchase, manufacture, and test of ammunition for seacoast cannon, including the necessary experiments in connection therewith, and the machinery necessary for Its manufacture at the arsenals, $575,000; Fire Control-For the construction of fire-control stations and the purchase and installation of accessories therefor, $200,000;

In all, specifically for fortifications and armament thereof for the Panama Canal, $4,870,000. The Secretary of War is authorized and directed to cause to be prepared and submit to Congress on or before December 15, 1913, complete plans for, and detailed estimates of, barracks and quarters for the mobile army and seacoast artillery on the Canal zone and in the Hawaiian Islands.

The Panama Canal Act of 1912.

PROVISION FOR THE PERMANENT GOVERNMENT OF THE CANAL ZONE AND EXEMPTION OF COASTWISE VESSELS FROM TOLLS.

THE Sixty-second Congress, Second Session, passed "An act to provide for the opening, maintenance, protection and operation of the Panama Canal and for the sanitation and government of the Canal zone," which was approved August 24, 1912, and is as follows:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the zone of land and land under water of the width of ten miles extending to the distance of five miles on each side of the centre line of the route of the canal now being constructed thereon, which zone begins in the Caribbean Sea three marine miles from mean low-water mark and extends to and across the Isthmus of Panama Into the Pacific Ocean to the distance of three marine miles from mean low-water mark, excluding therefrom the cities of Panama and Colon and their adjacent harbors located within said zone, as excepted in the treaty with the Republic of Panama dated November 18, 1903, but including all Islands within said described zone, and in addition thereto the group of islands in the Bay of Panama named Perico, Naos, Culebra and Flamenco, and any lands and waters outside of said limits above described which are necessary or convenient or from time to time may become necessary or convenient for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation, or protection of the said canal or of any auxillary canals. lakes, or other works necessary or convenient for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation, or protection of said canal, the use, occupancy, or control whereof were granted to the United States by the treaty between the United States and the Republic of Panama, the ratifications of which were exchanged February 26, 1904, shall be known and designated as the Canal zone, and the canal now being constructed thereon shall hereafter be known and designated as the Panama Canal. The President is authorized, by treaty with the Republic of Panama, to acquire any additional land or land under water not already granted, or which was excepted from the grant, that he may deem necessary for the operation, maintenance, sanitation, or protection of the Panama Canal, and to exchange any land or land under water not deemed necessary for such purposes for other land or land under water which may be deemed necessary for such purposes, which additional land or land under water so acquired shall become part of the Canal zone.

Sec. 2. That all laws, orders, regulations, and ordinances adopted and promulgated in the Canal zone by order of the President for the government and sanitation of the Canal zone and the construction of the Panama Canal are hereby ratified and confirmed as valid and binding until

THE PANAMA CANAL ACT OF 1912-Continued.

Congress shall otherwise provide.
order are recognized and confirmed to continue in operation until the courts provided for in this
The existing courts established in the Canal zone by Executive
act shall be established.

Sec. 3. That the President is authorized to declare by Executive order that all land and land under water within the limits of the Canal zone is necessary for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation, or protection of the Panama Canal, and to extinguish, by agreement when advisable, all claims and titles of adverse claimants and occupants. agreement title to any such parcel of land or land under water the adverse claim or occupancy shall be disposed of and title thereto secured in the United States and compensation therefor fixed and Upon failure to secure by paid in the manner provided in the aforesaid treaty with the Republic of Panama, or such modification of such treaty as may hereafter be made.

A PERMANENT GOVERNMENT FOR THE CANAL ZONE.

Sec. 4. That when in the Judgment of the President the construction of the Panama Canal shall be sufficiently advanced toward completion to render the further services of the Isthmian Canal Commission unnecessary the President is authorized by Executive order to discontinue the Isthmian Canal Commission, which, together with the present organization, shall then cease to exist; and the President is authorized thereafter to complete, govern, and operate the Panama Canal and govern the Canal zone, or cause them to be completed, governed and operated, through a Governor of the Panama Canal and such other persons as he may deem competent to discharge the various duties connected with the completion, care, protection of the canal and Canal zone. If any of the persons appointed or employed as aforesaid maintenance, sanitation, operation, government, and shall be persons in the military or naval service of the United States, the amount of the of clal salary paid to any such person shall be deducted from the amount of salary or compensation provided by or which shall be fixed under the terms of this act. The Governor of the Panama Canal shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, commissioned for a term of four years, and until his successor shall be appointed and qualified. salary of ten thousand dollars a year. agement, maintenance, sanitation, government, ope.ation, and protectica of the Panama Canal All other persons necessary for the completion, care, manHe shall receive a and Canal zone shall be appointed by the President, or by his authority, removable at his pleasure, and the compensation of such persons shall be fixed by the President, or by his authority, until such time as Congress may by law regulate the same, but salaries or compensation fixed hereunder by the President shall in no instance exceed by more than twenty-five per centum the salary or compensation paid for the same or similar services to persons employed by the Government in Čontinental United States. the same to be officially and formally opened for use and operation. That upon the completion of the Panama Canal the President shall cause

Before the completion of the canal, the Commission of Arts may make report to the President of their recommendation regarding the artistic character of the structures of the canal, such report to be transmitted to Congress.

NO TOLLS ON

AMERICAN COASTWISE VESSELS.

Sec. 5. That the President is hereby authorized to prescribe and from time to time change the tolls that shall be levied by the Government of the United States for the use of the Panama Canal: Provided, That no tolls, when prescribed as above, shall be changed, unless six months' notice thereof shall have been given by the President by proclamation. upon vessels engaged in the coastwise trade of the United States. and thirty-two of the Revised Statutes is hereby amended to read as follows: No tolls shall be levied "Sec. 4132. Vessels built within the United States and belonging wholly to citizens thereof; That section forty-one hundred and vessels which may be captured in war by citizens of the United States and lawfully condemned as prize, or which may be adjudged to be forfeited for a breach of the laws of the United States; and seagoing vessels, whether steam or sall, which have been certified by the Steamboat Inspection Service as safe to carry dry and perishable cargo, not more than five years old at the time they apply for registry, wherever built, which are to engage only in trade with foreign countries or with the Philippine Islands and the Islands of Guam and Tutulla, being wholly owned by citizens of the United States or corporations organized and chartered under the laws of the United States or of any State thereof, the President and managing directors of which shall be citizens of the United States or corporations organized and chartered under the laws of the United States or of any State thereof, the President and managing directors of which shall be eltizens of the United States, and no others, may be registered as directed in this tile. this act shall not engage in the coastwise trade: boat, or vessel not used or intended to be used for trade admitted to American registry pursuant to Foreign-built vessels registered pursuant to Provided, That a foreign-built yacht, pleasure this section shall not be exempt from the collection of ad valorem duty provided in section thirtyseven of the act approved August 5, 1909, entitled 'An act to provide revenue, equalize duties, and encourage the Industries of the United States, and for other purposes.' That all materials of foreign production which may be necessary for the construction or repair of vessels built in the United States and all such materials necessary for the building or repair of their machinery and all articles necessary for their outat and equipment may be imported into the United States free of duty under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe: admitted under the provisions of this section may contract with the Postmaster-General under the act of March 3, 1891, entitled 'An act to provide for ocean mail service between the United States Provided further. That such vessels so and foreign ports, and to promote commerce,' so long as such vessels shall in all respects comply with the provisions and requirements of said act."

Tolls may be based upon gross or net registered tonnage, displacement tonnage, or otherwise, and may be based on one form of tonnage for warships and another for ships of commerce. rate of tolls may be lower upon vessels in ballast than upon vessels carrying passengers or cargo. When based upon net registered tonnage for ships of commerce the tolls shall not exceed one dollar and twenty-five cents per net registered ton, nor be less, other than for vessels of the United States The and its citizens, than the estimated proportionate cost of the actual maintenance and operation of the canal, subject, however, to the provisions of article nineteen of the convention between the United States and the Republic of Panama, entered into November 18, 1903. If the tolls shall not be based upon net registered tonnage, they shall not exceed the equivalent of one dollar and twentyfive cents per net registered ton as nearly as the same may be determined, nor be less than the equivalent of seventy-five cents per net registered ton. more than one dollar and fifty cents. The President is authorized to make and from time to time amend regulations governing the operation of the Panama Canal, and the passage and control of The toll for each passenger shall not be vessels through the same or any part thereof, including the locks and approaches thereto, and all rules and regulations affecting pilots and pilotage in the canal or the approaches thereto through the adjacent waters.

Such regulations shall provide for prompt adjustment by agreement and immediate payment of claims for damages which may arise from injury to vessels, cargo, or passengers from the passing of vessels through the locks under the control of those operating them under such rules and regu

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