Lee and His Lieutenants: Comprising the Early Life, Public Services, and Campaigns of General Robert E. Lee and His Companions in Arms, with a Record of Their Campaigns and Heroic Deeds ...

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E. B. Treat & Company, 1867 - 851 Seiten
 

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Seite 163 - You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed ; and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you His blessing and protection. With an unceasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful 'remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. RE LEE, General.
Seite 160 - The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. \ This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their parole and the laws in force where they may reside.
Seite 209 - I have just received your note, informing me that you were wounded. I cannot express my regret at the occurrence. Could I have directed events, I should have chosen, for the good of the country, to have been disabled in your stead. I congratulate you upon the victory which is due to your skill and energy.
Seite 393 - I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, as you have failed to arrest the advance of the enemy to the vicinity of Atlanta, far in the interior of Georgia, and express no confidence that you can defeat or repel him, you are hereby relieved from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, -which you will immediately turn over to General Hood.
Seite 82 - Virginia lost, Washington menaced, Maryland invaded — the national cause could afford no risks of defeat. One battle lost, and almost all would have been lost. Lee's army might then have marched as it pleased on Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, or New York. It could have levied its supplies from a fertile and undevastated country ; extorted tribute from wealthy and populous cities ; and nowhere east of the Alleghanies was there another organized force able to arrest its march.
Seite 583 - Restless it rolls, now fixed, and now anon Flashing afar, — and at his iron feet Destruction cowers, to mark what deeds are done ; For on this morn three potent Nations meet, To shed before his Shrine the blood he deems most sweet.
Seite 80 - Burnside this is the battle of the war. He must hold his ground till dark at any cost. I will send him Miller's battery. I can do nothing more. I have no infantry." Then, as the messenger was riding away, he called him back. " Tell him if he cannot hold his ground, then the bridge, to the last man ! — always the bridge ! If the bridge is lost, all is lost.
Seite 54 - ... that standing armies in time of peace should be avoided as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Seite 665 - He exhibited the weakness of supposing that an army that had been beaten and fearfully decimated in a vain attempt at the defensive could successfully undertake the offensive against the army that had so often defeated it.
Seite 156 - I desired to know whether your proposals would lead to that end. I cannot, therefore, meet you with a view to surrender the Army of Northern Virginia : but, as far as your proposal may affect the Confederate States...

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