Descriptive Catalogue of the Woods Commonly Employed in this Country for the Mechanical and Ornamental Arts

Cover
Holtzapffel, 1852 - 118 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 97 - The trunks of the palms are not considered by physiological botanists to be true wood ; they all grow from within, and are always soft and spongy in the centre, but are gradually harder towards the outside ; they do not possess the medullary rays of the proper woods, but only the vertical fibres, which are held together by a much softer substance, like pith or cement, so that the horizontal section is always dotted, by which they may be readily distinguished from all true woods.
Seite 98 - Ceylon, for the construction of flat roofs ; the joists of which consist of two slabs, the third or fourth part of the tree, bolted together by their flat sides so as to constitute elliptical rafters. They are covered first with flat tiles, and then with a white concrete called Chunam, consisting of shell lime, yolks of eggs, and Jaggree, (sugar,) beaten together with water in which the husks of the cocoa-nuts have been steeped.
Seite 105 - The bark of the sandal-wood gives a most beautiful red or light claret-coloured dye, but it fades almost immediately when used as a simple infusion ; in the hands of the experienced dyer it might, it is supposed, be> very useful. There are woods described in the French works as red sandal-woods, and one specimen is so marked in Baker's collection ; probably they are varieties of red saunders or sapan woods.
Seite 46 - Streaker may be used either by itself or in aid of carving ; and depends on the fact, that if a depression be made by a blunt instrument on the surface of the wood, such depressed part will again rise to its original level by subsequent immersion in water.
Seite 46 - ... depression is equal to the subsequent prominence of the figures. The ground is then to be reduced by planing or filing to the level of the depressed part ; after which, the piece of wood being placed in water, either hot or cold, the parts previously depressed will rise to their former height, and will thus form an embossed pattern, which may be finished by the usual operations of carving.
Seite 83 - Thuja artic.ulata t (see Arbor vita?,) was also used by the ancients, and has sometimes been mistaken for that of Cypress. DEAL. See PINES. DOG-WOOD, a small underwood, which is so remarkably free from silex, that little splinters of the wood are used by the watchmaker for cleaning out the pivot-holes of watches, and by the optician for removing the dust from small deep-seated lenses ; dogwood is also used for butchers
Seite 91 - Mahogang is a native of the West Indies and the country round the Bay of Honduras. It is said to be of rapid growth, and so large that its trunk often exceeds 40 feet in length and 6 feet in diameter. Spanish mahogany is imported from Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, St. Domingo, and some other of the West India Islands, in logs from about 20 to 26 inches square and 10 feet long.
Seite 46 - ... of the wood, till the depth of the depression is equal to the subsequent prominence of the figures. The ground is then to be reduced by planing or filing to the level of the depressed part ; after which the piece of wood being placed in water...
Seite 46 - The new method may be used either by itself or in aid of carving -, and depends on the fact, that if a depression be made by a blunt instrument on the surface of wood, such depressed part will again rise to its original level by subsequent immersion in water.
Seite 76 - European boxwood is imported from Leghorn, Portugal, &c. The English boxwood is plentiful at Boxhill in Surrey, and in Gloucestershire ; it is more curly in growth, softer and paler than the Turkey boxwood ; its usual diameters are from 1 to 5 in.; it is used for common turnery, and is preferred by brass finishers for their lathe-chucks, as it is tougher than the foreign box and bears rougher usage.

Bibliografische Informationen